Widow shares story of husband’s decision to end his own suffering

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copyright the Chronicle September 20, 2017

 

by Tena Starr

 

EAST CHARLESTON — Eric Stevens was 67 years old last year in July when his son-in-law carried him out to the porch, where, surrounded by his immediate family, he ate a pudding-like mixture of Seconal and maple syrup. Soon, possibly within minutes, he was dead.

Mr. Stevens was a musician and an avid outdoorsman. In a photo taken less than two weeks before his death, he looks young for 67, tanned and robust, his dark eyes looking into the camera in the straightforward manner he was known for.

But he was far from robust by then. He had an advanced case of multiple systems atrophy (MSA), a rare neurological disease.  It’s similar to Parkinson’s, but crueler.  Parkinson’s victims often develop dementia towards the end.  Those who suffer from MSA do not.  Their bodies shut down bit by bit, but the brain is acutely aware of every bodily failure, every indignity, of the next dreadful step in the progression of their fatal disease.

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Still more questions than answers about Shrinedom

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copyright the Chronicle September 20, 2017

 

by Brad Usatch

 

EAST ALBANY — Four days after a planned daylong music festival collapsed for apparent lack of funds, organizers remain reluctant to explain exactly what happened, or what measures, if any, will be taken to compensate ticket holders who feel they were scammed.

Set to take place on the property of the Creek Hill Barn, Shrinedom 2017 was advertised by promoter Marc Clay of Crossova Concepts as a benefit for the Mt. Sinai Shriners #3 based in Montpelier. The Shriners are an international fraternal organization most noted for creating a network of 22 children’s hospitals across North America. According to the Shrinedom Facebook page, Crossova was teaming up with Kingdom Cares, Inc., to produce the show. Kingdom Cares is a Vermont corporation with Shriner Adam B. Johnson of Irasburg listed as its sole agent.

Gates were set to open at 7 a.m. on what turned out to be a picture perfect Saturday on September 16. A trio of rising New England country acts was slated to play from mid-morning into the afternoon, and that part of the concert went off without a hitch.

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Orchard owner searching for stolen apple trees

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copyright the Chronicle September 20, 2017

 

by Tena Starr

 

BARTON — Randolph Cross of West Glover is looking for information about who stole two of his best apple trees.

Mr. Cross, who lives on Parker Pond, also owns property on Route 16 in Barton, just north of Glover Village. He’s put up a garage there, and has perennial gardens, a vegetable garden, and a small orchard with apple and nut trees — walnuts, pecans, and chestnuts.

“It’s something to do, to keep my mind working and to keep active,” he said.

It’s a tidy and well-tended place that Mr. Cross said is something of an experiment — to see what grows and thrives here. He did auto repair for 40 years, which is why he built the garage, he said.

The apple trees were four years old and producing well, Mr. Cross said. His theory is that someone dug them up to transplant them in the woods, or a field somewhere, to bait deer.

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Chief says Newport Police Department gravely understaffed

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copyright the Chronicle September 20, 2017

 

by Joseph Gresser

 

NEWPORT — At its meeting Monday, the city council heard about the difficulties officers face in the city’s understaffed police department. They also voted for November balloting on a $3-million bond for a new water tower, and re-examined downtown renewal efforts.

Newport City Police Chief Seth DiSanto presented council members with a summary of his department’s activities over the past year comparing them with the year before.

Traffic stops accounted for the highest percentage of calls, about 28 percent. But Chief DiSanto said that doesn’t reflect the amount of actual time spent on a call. Larceny calls can take days to investigate, while traffic stops are done in a matter of minutes, he said.

The chief’s main business, though, was a discussion of staffing in his department, which is presently short two officers.

Although he has two recruits undergoing training as part-time officers, the chief said they will not be able to complete training as full-time officers any sooner than June. Even then, the new officers will need at least 400 more hours of on-the-job training before they can wear the Newport badge and uniform, Chief DiSanto said.

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Obituaries September 20, 2017

Joyce E. Baraw

Joyce E. Baraw, 69, of Newport Center, died on September 10, 2017, at her home with her family by her side.

She leaves her husband David Baraw of Newport Center; her children: Mary Ellen Wheeler of Morrisville, Tina Richardson and her husband, Ken, of Lowell, Joanie Beauregard and her husband, Rob, of Enosburg Falls, Travis Lee Baraw of Newport Center, and Alice Perry and her husband, Ralph, of Stowe. She is also survived by her stepdaughter Tammy Gilfillian and her husband, Ron, of Holland; and by several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Services will be held at the convenience of the family.

Memorial contributions may be made in her memory to the Mary Wright Halo Foundation, 1073 Upper Quarry Road, Newport, Vermont 05855.

Online condolences may be shared at www.curtis-britch.com.

 

Omer P. Choquette

Omer P. Choquette, 77, of Derby, a well-known local businessman and the beloved husband of Rita Choquette, died on September 16, 2017, in Newport.

He was born on March 16, 1940, in North Troy to the late Leo and Gracia (Beaulieu) Choquette. On December 16, 1967, he married Rita Brochu, who survives him.

Mr. Choquette was the owner of Omer Choquette Trucking and Excavating, and served in the Vermont National Guard for six years.

He enjoyed going for rides with the family, and going to Florida for the winter in their motorhome. He took great pride in seeing that his equipment always looked and ran like new. He loved the time that he spent with his grandchildren, and liked living with his dog “Kaya” that he seemed to inherit from his son. He was a member of the Elks and the American Legion. Mr. and Mrs. Choquette also enjoyed going out to dinner with friends.

Besides his wife, he is survived by his two sons: Scott Choquette and his partner, Richard Bilodeau, and Marc Choquette and his wife, Katie; his grandchildren: Logan and Olivia Choquette; his siblings: Pauline Choquette, Lucille Cadieux and her husband, Robert, Richard Choquette and his wife, Darlene; his sister-in-law Gloria Choquette; and by his nieces and nephews: Gerard Choquette and his wife, Diane, and their two sons: Marcel and Michael, Randy and Wendy Choquette, Tina, Vickie, Darren and Shawn Cadieux, and Jason, Jonathan, and Nicole Choquette.

He was predeceased by his parents and his brother Roger Choquette.

A graveside service will be held on Friday, September 22, at St. Mary’s Cemetery in Newport at 1:30 p.m.

Memorial contributions may be made in Mr. Choquette’s memory to the oncology department at North Country Hospitel, 189 Prouty Drive, Newport, Vermont 05855, or to the Mary Wright Halo Foundation, 1073 Upper Quarry Road, Newport, Vermont 05855.

Online condolences may be made at www.curtis-britch.com.

 

Arthea J. Lafoe

Arthea J. Lafoe, 67, of Brownington, died on September 15, 2017, in Newport.

She was born on August 25, 1950, in St. Albans, to Arthur and Abby (Clapper) Ashline. On September 29, 1979, she married Roland Lafoe, who survives her.

Ms. Lafoe loved her family and grandchildren, and loved spending time with them. She loved having people around and also loved to cook. Everyone loved her food, especially her mac and cheese.

Besides her husband, she is survived by her children: Paul Martin of Tennessee, Shannon Byers and her husband, Chad, of Lowell, and Megan Brace of Richford. She is also survived by her grandchildren: Baylee, Mackenna, Colby, and Paul Martin III, Logan Degree and Tamera and Tony Brace. She is survived by her siblings: Steven Ashline and his wife, Mary Jane, of Swanton, Diane Adams and her husband, Robert, of Barton, and Robin Ashline of Richford; by her niece Renne Martinez and her husband, David, of Brownington; by their children: Tia and Carlos Martinez, Tori Adams, Caitlyn Gage, and Damion Gage; and by her great-niece Miss Hailey Jean.

Private services will be held at the convenience of the family. Online condolences may be shared at curtis-britch.com.

 

Maria Seguin

Maria “Mary” Seguin, 92, formerly of Island Pond, died peacefully in Forest, Ontario, on August 24, 2017.

She was born on September 19, 1924, in Czechoslovakia, a daughter of Peter and Maria Ivanco.

Mrs. Seguin retired as a supervisor at Alcan (aluminum) in Arvida, Quebec, having been an employee there during her entire adult life.

She was an excellent cook and baker, and at summer’s end, canned many jars of pickles and other produce. She enjoyed playing cards, reading, eating out, and visiting.

She was predeceased by her loving husband, Roland Seguin, and later, Walter Seguin (cousins). She was the beloved mother of the late Robert Seguin.

She leaves her granddaughter Kimberly Habra and her husband, Anthony; and three great-grandchildren. She is also survived by her sisters: Pauline Brown and Helen Biermat, all of Canada; and was predeceased by her sister Annie Boris, also of Canada.

She is survived by her sister-in-law Franchesca Jodrey of Berlin, New Hampshire; and her brother-in-law Jean Paul Seguin and his family of Stanstead, Quebec. Her nieces, nephews, and close friends fondly remember her.

Interment will take place at the Derby Line Village Cemetery in Derby Line, next to her beloved husband, Walter, on Friday, September 22, at 3 p.m., with Deacon Ward Nolan officiating.

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Swastikas, racist slogans sprayed on local roads and buildings

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copyright the Chronicle September 13, 2017

 

by Elizabeth Trail

 

GLOVER — Swastikas, racist epithets, and crudely drawn penises were spray painted on road surfaces, mailboxes, and the side of a farm building in Glover sometime during the night of September 7.

The incident prompted a GoFundMe campaign, which was started on Monday by Mateo Kehler of Jasper Hill Farm. It raised $4,535 in less than 24 hours toward a reward to help catch the perpetrators.

Jasper Hill is one of the owners of Andersonville Farm in West Glover. A building there was defaced with “get out” and “nigger” along with a hashtag, a swastika, and a Nazi SS symbol.

About ten feet of pavement on the Shadow Lake Road was co-opted for a swastika and the message “I kill niggers.” Sexual drawings and slogans were painted in the oncoming lane.

A swastika was painted on a stop sign at the intersection of Shadow Lake Road and Mud Island Road. A mailbox in that area was defaced with swastikas on one side and the word “nig” on the other. Another mailbox had swastikas, the twin lightning-bolt SS symbol, and a sexual reference.

Law enforcement is handling the incident as unlawful mischief.

A joint press release from the Vermont State Police and the Orleans County Sheriff’s Department says, “Sometime after dark on September 7, 2017, the offender(s) spray painted on the side of a barn, the roadway, mailboxes and posts.”

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Broken family wants case resolved

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copyright the Chronicle September 13, 2017

 

by Joseph Gresser

 

When Katrina McCullough of Newport called police last December and accused her husband of bending her fingers back, she had no idea what the consequences of her actions would turn out to be.

Today she finds herself in danger of losing her house and faces severe economic challenges despite having a good job. Ryan McCullough, her husband, lives in a homeless shelter for veterans in Norwich, and the couple’s children see their father only rarely.

Because Orleans County Superior Court has a heavy backlog of cases awaiting trial, the McCulloughs will not see a resolution until January at the earliest.

Ms. McCullough says she was in the clutches of severe mental distress when she dialed the phone in December. Knowing what she does now, she strongly regrets making that call.

Mr. McCullough is facing misdemeanor and felony charges of domestic abuse and, despite filing a speedy trial motion in June, is not scheduled for trial until January.

He had been scheduled for trial in August, but the court schedule was changed and he must now wait an additional five months for resolution.

As a result, Ms. McCullough said in a recent interview, her husband is in the shelter while she and her two daughters are facing the prospect of losing the family house for lack of money to pay the mortgage. Mr. McCullough, a veteran who has struggled with PTSD, cannot stay in the shelter past January and will be homeless in winter if the situation is not resolved by then, his wife said.

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Hemp is hot new agricultural venture

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copyright the Chronicle September 13, 2017

by Elizabeth Trail

 

EAST BURKE — “Welcome to history,” said Eli Harrington, one of the organizers of Vermont Hemp Fest 2017, held over the weekend at the Burke Mountain Hotel and Conference Center. He’s also co-founder and editor of Heady Vermont, an online magazine and podcast for fans of the hemp plant — cannabis — in all its forms.

It was standing room only at Hemp Fest, a get together mostly for people interested in producing and marketing agricultural hemp. There were speakers from all over the country, evening “hempy hours” and entertainment, and a chance to try and buy hemp-based products ranging from clothing to food and supplements.

Mr. Harrington believes the three-day gathering over the weekend just might be the first time that a cannabis event has occurred at a ski resort.

Speakers took care to clarify that they were there to talk about growing hemp for food, fiber, and medicine.

People traveled from all over and paid admission to get the latest information on growing, refining, and marketing legal hemp products.

“What we’re looking for is a Vermont product with a national market,” Mr. Harrington said.

But many also expressed hope that, after marijuana and hemp are both fully legalized, the tent will be big enough to welcome the full spectrum of cannabis products.

Outside the building, it was obvious from the wafting smoke that some of the pre-conference write-ups about “ganjapreneurship” and “free Maryjane” had drawn their own audience.

Hemp and marijuana are pretty much the same plant. But marijuana gets its kick from tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a psychoactive compound that also boasts a variety of medical uses.

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Remembering those who died at their own hand

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copyright the Chronicle September 13, 2017

 

by Joseph Gresser

 

NEWPORT — Matt Chaput said he doesn’t keep track of how long it’s been since his brother Shawn took his own life.

“Four or five years,” was his estimate.

His imprecision is not because he doesn’t care. His brother is never far from his thoughts, and remains close to him physically as well.

Mr. Chaput rolled up his sleeve Saturday morning and showed the startlingly life-like portrait of his brother he had tattooed onto his left forearm.

He was among the more than 200 people who walked through Newport Saturday to commemorate those who died by their own hand, and to do what they can to spare others the sorrow they feel at the loss of loved ones.

Many wore shirts showing who inspired them to participate in Newport’s sixth annual Out of the Darkness Community Walk. Mr. Chaput and many of his friends and family members sported bright blue shirts that read “Team Shawn.” Others wore yellow T-shirts indicating they were part of Team Donnelly, and another team had orange shirts printed with a drawing of a halo and a pair of angels’ wings with the words “in loving memory of Don Cota.”

The walk is sponsored by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. It raises money to pay for programs intended to educate the public about the toll suicide takes on the community, and to help people experiencing dark and dangerous episodes come out alive on the other side.

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Obituaries September 13, 2017

Roger Ernest Berard

Roger Ernest Berard, 55, also known as Beige, Raji, Jammie Man, Smoothie, and Poppi, died on August 22, 2017, in his childhood home in Barton, surrounded by his loving family after a short yet fierce battle with pancreatic cancer. He is now reunited in the mysterious beyond with his wife, Loli, and their firstborn son, Jason.

Born on August 21, 1962, in Newport, to Gilles Berard and Jeannine Vezina Berard, he always marched to the beat of his own drum. A musician extraordinaire with perfect pitch, Mr. Berard was a drummer since the age of 13 when he joined his mother’s country-rock band, the Shangri Las. His love for music led him through life, playing in several bands including St. Elmo’s Kettle Band, Magnum, Fingertalk, Free Fall, Science Fixion, and Zero Gravity, along with various jazz trios and quartets. He toured around the country and the world, eventually ending up in Burlington, playing regularly at Nectar’s in the early ’80s. It was in Burlington where he met the love of his life, Loli, and they began their life and family together.

Mr. Berard was a loyal employee of FedEx for 22 years where his precision and efficiency were able to shine every day. In late December, the most stressful time of the year for many curriers, he donned a red striped hat with two jingle bells, delighting his customers and delivering joy wherever he walked.

An awesome father to his four children, his home was always open and welcoming. He was generous and playful, quick with a quip and first to correct, laid-back yet here, there, and everywhere. His heart was large and accepting, never holding on to any hard feelings or bothering with grudges. He simply loved spending time with people.

Though gone from this physical world, Mr. Berard will never leave the hearts of his parents, Jeannine and Gilles; his brother Paul, his sister Lynne; and his uncle Pete. He is forever loved and adored by his remaining children: Roger, Lucas, and Sophia; his son-in-law Luke; and his grandson Cosimo. His extended family and in-laws, his many friends near and dear, and most anyone who had the pleasure to have met him will miss his unique charm and incredible character.

In lieu of a service, Mr. Berard’s family and friends celebrate his life in every drum solo on a tabletop, crack of the pool balls, swing of the golf club, Ping-Pong match, batch of popcorn, every harmony (sung just right), and every gathering with music, laughter, and love.

 

Andrew J. Domina

Andrew J. Domina, 94, of Barton, formerly of Newport, died on September 5, 2017, in Barton.

He was born on July 6, 1923, in Derby Line, to Hector and Marie Rose (Couture) Domina. He was a veteran of World War II. Early in his life he was employed by the former Lewis Dairy, and later at Butterfield’s Tap and Dye in Derby Line, where he retired after 30 years of service. He also owned and operated the Hillside Sharpening and Odd Jobs.

He enjoyed reading, and his biggest accomplishment was traveling to Egypt to see the pyramids by himself.

He is survived by his children: Wayne Domina of Albuquerque, New Mexico, Barbara Martin of St. Johnsbury, Martha Brown of Orlando, Florida, Joy Madrona of Miles City, Montana, Margaret Domina of Westfield, John Domina of Westfield, and Bruce Domina of Marshill, North Carolina; by his sister Mary White of Bedford, Quebec; and by many nieces and nephews; ten grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

He is predeceased by his siblings: Jack, Laurent, Bernard, Camille, Leonard, and Francis St. Sauveur, Genevieve Burlton, and Alice Rodrique.

A graveside service with full military honors was held on September 9, at St. Edward’s Catholic Cemetery in Derby Line with the Reverend Roger Charbonneau officiating. Online condolences can be shared at curtis-britch.com.

 

Kenneth I. Griswold

Kenneth I. Griswold, 71 of Troy, formerly of Canton, Connecticut, died peacefully surrounded by his family on, September 5, 2017, after a brief illness.

He was born on February 25, 1946, in Hartford, Connecticut, to Ernest and Alice (Bailey) Griswold.

After serving in the United States Air Force he moved to Canton and spent the rest of his career working for SNET America, in telecommunications. After retiring he moved to Troy, where he made many close friends. In his retirement he became a certified harness driver and enjoyed spending time with friends at the races. Mr. Griswold also became an avid snowmobiler and a member, volunteer, and director of the Country Riders, with whom he rode thousands of miles each winter. He was always happiest when enjoying the outdoors with his beloved English mastiff, Tess, and his many friends and neighbors. People were always welcome to ride through his property or visit his pond as long as they stopped to say hello. Mr. Griswold was also an experienced maple syrup maker who constructed his very own sugar shack.

He is survived by his two sons: Kyle Griswold and his wife, Kristie, of Canton, Keith Griswold and his wife, Kim, of Suffield, Connecticut; and his three grandchildren: Alexis, Keith Jr. (KJ), and Kendra. He also leaves behind a brother Dan Griswold of Stratford, Connecticut, and Linda Griswold of Niantic, Connecticut, with whom he spent many years. Other than his parents, he was predeceased by his brother John Griswold of South Windsor, Connecticut.

A celebration of Mr. Griswold’s life will be held on Saturday, September 23, at the American Legion located at 254 Dominion Avenue in North Troy, from 1 to 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations can be made to Country Riders, P.O. Box 26, Troy, Vermont 05868.

 

Norma J. (Chayer) Hayes

Norma J. (Chayer) Hayes, 54, of Barnet, died September 9, 2017, at her home following a brief illness.

She was born in Lebanon, New Hampshire, on October 11, 1962, a daughter of Rodney and Nancy (Mitchell) Chayer. She graduated from Lyndon Institute and received her bachelor’s degree from Springfield College in human services. For many years she worked for the Vermont Agency of Human Services and more recently for the Department for Children and Families.

Ms. Hayes loved the outdoors — be it biking, kayaking, or camping — and held a very strong passion for music of all kinds.

Survivors include her husband, Robert Hayes, of Barnet, whom she married on August 21, 2010; three children: Preston Ellsworth and his wife, Jillian, of Waterford, Joanna Hayes of Sheffield, and Alena Hayes and her partner, Wayne Johnson, of St. Johnsbury; two grandchildren; her mother, Nancy Mitchell, of Barton; three sisters: Andy Young and Rhonda Chayer both of Barton, and Phyllis Robinson of Lisbon, New Hampshire, a brother Rodney Chayer of Waterbury; along with several nieces, nephews, cousins, aunts, and uncles.

In keeping with Ms. Hayes’ wishes, private services will be held.

Should friends desire, memorial contributions can be made to any fund or organization that assists children.

      Laugh when you can

      Apologize when you should

      Let go of what you can’t change

      Life is too short to be unhappy

For more information, or to sign an online condolence please visit www.rickerfh.com.

 

Rose Quarmby

Rose Quarmby, 92, of Derby, died on September
4, 2017, in Derby.

She was born on June 10, 1925, in Hull, United
Kingdom, to Edwin and Rose Hannah (Lamb) Balding. On
November 30, 1946, she married Alec Quarmby, who survives her. She received her education in the United Kingdom.

Mrs. Quarmby was employed by Automatic Signal Company in Norwalk,
Connecticut, where she worked on circuit boards, and later was a soldering
technician for Perkin-Elmer in Norwalk, Connecticut. She was a veteran of
World War II, serving in the British Army where she was a cook and met her future husband, Alec.

She enjoyed sewing, swimming, and skiing in
her younger years, and ballroom dancing with Mr. Quarmby. She fostered many children while living in California.

Besides her husband of Derby, she is survived by her children: Donovan Quarmby Sr. and his wife, Linda, of Derby, Geraldine
Rogers and her husband, Gary, of East Barre, and Dorian Quarmby of Newport; by her grandchildren: Donovan
Quarmby Jr. of Gilbert, Arizona, Amber Sitar of Charlotte, North Carolina, and
Summer Stelter of Newport; by her great-grandchildren:
 Brielle, Brynn, and Trey Quarmby of Gilbert, Ethan and Keira
Sitar of Charlotte, North Carolina, and Rex Stelter of Newport.

She was predeceased by her sister Enid Bell; and by two brothers:
 Norman and Leslie Balding.

A funeral service will be held on Friday, September 15, at 2 p.m., at the Curtis-Britch-Converse-Rushford Funeral Home located at 37 Lake Road in Newport. The Reverend Kelly Deslauriers will officiate the service. Friends may call at the funeral home from 1 p.m. until the hour of the service.

Should friends desire, contributions in her memory may be made
to the Alzheimer’s Association of Vermont, 300 Corner Stone Drive,
Suite 128, Williston, Vermont 05495; or to Newport Foster Parent
Association, care of Tammy Lalime, 100 Main Street, Suite 230,
Newport, Vermont 05855.

Online condolences can be shared at curtis-britch.com.

 

Joyce Winifred (Morey) Simons

Joyce Winifred (Morey) Simons, 70, died peacefully on September 3, 2017, at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire, surrounded by her children and grandchildren.

She is survived by her partner of 32 years Girard “Boot” Boutin of Evansville; her sons: Jay W. Simons and his wife, Julie, of Bolton, and Lance E. Simons and his wife, Carolyn, of Claremont, New Hampshire; and her grandchildren: Bruce Simons, Jack Dubuque, Ben Dubuque, Jay B. Simons, Samantha Smith, Samantha Corbett, Bryan Simons, Lauren Dubuque, Justin Corbett, Carmen Simons, Noah Simons, Gunnar Simons, and Evan Simons. She is also survived by her cousin and best friend Marge Degreenia Carter. Ms. Simons also leaves nine great-grandchildren; and many nieces, nephews, and extended family with whom she was very close.

She is preceded in death by her parents Alvin and Gertrude Morey of Sutton (and later Lyndonville); her two brothers: Irvin Morey of Island Pond, and Bradley Morey of Pompano Beach, Florida; and two of her sons: Ronnie B. Simons of Coventry, and Adam B. Simons of Evansville.

Ms. Simons was born on March 27, 1947, in Sutton, to Alvin and Gertrude Morey. She graduated high school from Lyndon Institute in 1965. After high school she and her husband Earle Simons started a family farm and welcomed their four sons into the home and set about teaching them a solid work ethic. Her sons remember her as a generous and kindhearted woman who could never turn anyone away. She dedicated her time to the patients at the Maple Lane Nursing Home in Barton. She is well known for welcoming stray animals and people into her home. Chris Toupin, Francis Bachelder, and several other children spent much time in her care. In later years she became a loving caregiver to Richard Gagnon who predeceased her in 2014.

She was an avid reader and a skilled craftsperson who enjoyed participating in craft fairs and competitions. She proudly displayed her many awards for her wreaths, dolls, doll clothes, canned goods, and other household creations.

A memorial was held on September 9 at the Brownington Center Church. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Ms. Simons’ name to the Brownington Center Church.

 

Denise M. Valley

Denise M. Valley, 83, of Barton, died peacefully on September 1, at St. Francis Hospital in Hartford, Connecticut, surrounded by her family.

Mrs. Valley was the loving wife to Roger R. Valley, who predeceased her.

She was one of twelve children born to Joseph and Florida Paquin of Barton. She graduated from Sacred Heart High School in Newport and later obtained an associate’s degree in accounting.

She is survived by her children: Douglas A. Valley and his wife, Liz, and James R. Valley and his wife, Charlene; her grandchildren: Sara Crehan and her husband, Seth, Greg Valley and his wife, Kristin, Ryan Valley, and Crystal Ortyl and her husband, Richard; and by her great-grandchildren: Halyn Valley, Camden Valley, Kendra Cekala, Brayden Cekala, Austin Crehan, Paisley Crehan, Kolton Ortyl, and Tatum Ortyl.

Mrs. Valley is also survived by her longtime companion and confidant, Raymond Campbell.

She is also survived by two siblings: Patrick Paquin and Adrienne Brault.

Mrs. Valley was a devoted Catholic who’s life revolved around her family, gardening, and working on her manicured lawn. She was a great role model to her family and will be missed greatly.

She was proud of her Barton community and provided service to support the town in the form of tutoring students on reading skills in the school system, developing requests for grants for funding various town projects, and providing audit support utilizing her accountant skills.

A graveside service is planned for Saturday, October 7, at 11 a.m., at St. Paul’s Cemetery in Barton.

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