Glover woman qualifies to compete in Olympic trials

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Leah Frost stands before a few of the many race bibs that decorate a wall of her Glover apartment.  Photos by Joseph Gresser

Leah Frost stands before a few of the many race bibs that decorate a wall of her Glover apartment. Photos by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle December 16, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

GLOVER — Leah Frost, who won the title of “Fastest Woman in Glover” at the 2013 and 2014 Glover Day Chamberlain Run, has earned the chance to match her mettle against some of her running heroes. A time of 2:42:52 in the California International Marathon means she has qualified to compete in trials for a slot on the U.S. Women’s Olympic Team.

The race was held in Sacramento, California, on December 6.

Ms. Frost, who lives in Glover, said Monday that she is under no illusion that she will be one of those chosen to represent the U.S. in the 2016 Olympic Games to be held in Rio De Janeiro next August. To do that, she said, would require her to cut around 20 minutes from her time.

If the weather stays as it has been and she’s able to train hard, Ms. Frost said she… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Glover vet gets a new home

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Dale Kilby of Glover plans to donate to the Disabled Veterans of the America in order to “pay it forward.”  Photo by Tena Starr

Dale Kilby of Glover plans to donate to the Disabled Veterans of the America in order to “pay it forward.” Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle November 25, 2015

by Tena Starr

GLOVER — Dale Kilby is a Vietnam vet who grew up on a West Glover farm. He’s spent the past 20 years living in a tiny silver camper in the woods a few miles south of Glover Village.

He works two days a week at the Glover recycling center, and he walks, or hitchhikes, wherever he needs to go. Since his home has no running water or electricity, that means hauling in everything he needs, including water, on foot. And since he rents the land, it wouldn’t make sense to drill a well, even if he could afford such an extravagance.

Some time ago, his decrepit trailer’s roof began to leak. He put up with it, but had a particularly tough winter last year. It was bitter, and the interior of the trailer could… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Local history buffs present work

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Pictured from left, Joan Alexander of the Glover Historical Society, writer Dolores E. Chamberlain, and Earl Randall of the Crystal Lake Falls Historical Association were the presenters on Monday night at a meeting on local history at the Barton library.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Pictured from left, Joan Alexander of the Glover Historical Society, writer Dolores E. Chamberlain, and Earl Randall of the Crystal Lake Falls Historical Association were the presenters on Monday night at a meeting on local history at the Barton library. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 22, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

BARTON — The area here changed drastically in the last century. Where Barton was a hub of activity, now the industry is gone and once-busy factory buildings are crumbling.

This was part of the focus of Earl Randall’s presentation on Barton’s history, which he gave at the library here on Monday. About ten people came to the meeting, to hear from different presenters about the stories, people, and general history of the area.

Mr. Randall, of the Crystal Lake Falls Historical Association, Joan Alexander of the Glover Historical Society, and writer Dolores E. Chamberlain presented the work they’ve done on the area to keep memories alive.

Mr. Randall brought old pictures of Barton and used a pointer to bring attention to different businesses that were once here, what happened to them, and what replaced them.

What made Barton the economic and social center of Orleans County were…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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World War II vet receives a letter from the Queen

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Donald Wheatley, formerly of Glover, received best wishes from Queen Elizabeth II for his service in World War II.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Donald Wheatley, formerly of Glover, received best wishes from Queen Elizabeth II for his service in World War II. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 1, 2015

by Tena Starr

NEWPORT — World War II veteran Donald Wheatley, formerly of Glover, received an unusual honor last week. Queen Elizabeth II of England sent him her best wishes and a photograph of herself.

A letter from the Queen’s lady-in-waiting was presented to Mr. Wheatley at Bel-Aire Quality Care Nursing Center in Newport on Wednesday, June 24.

“Donald has a rather illustrious and interesting past that caught Her Majesty’s attention,” said Sharon Campbell of Island Pond.

Ms. Campbell is originally from England…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Energetic senior citizen powers the new Glover meal site

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Gloria Powers pauses in the middle of cleaning the kitchen in the Glover Town Hall in preparation for the opening of the new Glover senior meal site on June 29.  From left to right are her granddaughter Brittany Marsh, honorary granddaughter Chelsea Pulver, Gloria Powers, and her daughter Kristi Powers, who is also Brittany's mother.  Ms. Pulver will also help cook and serve at the meal site.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Gloria Powers pauses in the middle of cleaning the kitchen in the Glover Town Hall in preparation for the opening of the new Glover senior meal site on June 29. From left to right are her granddaughter Brittany Marsh, honorary granddaughter Chelsea Pulver, Gloria Powers, and her daughter Kristi Powers, who is also Brittany’s mother. Ms. Pulver will also help cook and serve at the meal site. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle June 24, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

GLOVER — Gloria Powers never stands still. At 70 years old, she is a tiny dynamo of a woman who simply exudes energy. And right now, she’s a woman with a mission.

On Monday, June 29, Ms. Powers will serve up the first meals at the new senior meal site in the basement of the town hall here, and she still has a lot to do.

She is approaching the project with relish.

Last Friday morning, with just ten days to go before opening, she was busy cleaning and organizing the kitchen where she will cook the weekly senior meals. The menus were planned and the food donations were in the freezer….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Bread and Puppet Theater’s museum turns 40

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Here, Elka Schumann, whose husband, Peter Schumann, founded the Bread and Puppet Theater, sits next to the museum guard, a wooden figurine.  Traditionally, he sleeps in a nightcap in his bed on the bench next to where Ms. Schumann is sitting all winter when the museum is closed, and is woken up each summer for the open house.  When he’s on duty he wears a cap.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Here, Elka Schumann, whose husband, Peter Schumann, founded the Bread and Puppet Theater, sits next to the museum guard, a wooden figurine. Traditionally, he sleeps in a nightcap in his bed on the bench next to where Ms. Schumann is sitting all winter when the museum is closed, and is woken up each summer for the open house. When he’s on duty he wears a cap. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle June 10, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

GLOVER — Visitors jammed the lanes around the Bread and Puppet Theater’s grounds here with their cars on Sunday when they came for the museum’s open house.

The theater celebrated the fortieth anniversary of its puppet museum on Sunday with shape note singing, harp music, and mini-plays scattered around the yard.

The smell of garlic from the aioli that was served with Bread and Puppet’s signature sourdough bread permeated the museum.

Visitors could wander through over 40 years worth of big puppets and peruse and purchase posters, pamphlets, and books.

Burt Porter, a Glover poet and musician who has participated in opening the museum yearly since its inception, was given a wooden medal….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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contact Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph at [email protected]

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A mobile home hits the road

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This house trailer was abandoned in Irasburg at the intersection of the West Glover Road and Burton Hill sometime early Monday morning.  On its journey from Glover it lost its tires, but ventured on, tearing up the gravel road.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

This house trailer was abandoned in Irasburg at the intersection of the West Glover Road and Burton Hill sometime early Monday morning. On its journey from Glover it lost its tires, but ventured on, tearing up the gravel road. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 3, 2015

by Tena Starr 

IRASBURG — Town officials here were flummoxed Monday morning by the appearance of a house trailer at the intersection of the West Glover Road and Burton Hill. Not beside the road — in the road.

Someone had hauled the big yellow trailer there overnight and left it leaning against a telephone pole. That someone had also left quite a mess behind him. The trailer had been dragged for several miles without tires and had badly damaged the gravel road.

The house trailer started its journey in Glover Sunday night, and with tires. It came north on Route 16….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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contact Tena Starr at [email protected]

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At The Museum of Everyday Life:  the charms and trials of dust

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At great personal sacrifice, Linda Elbow refrained from cleaning her house for four months and put some of the results on display.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

At great personal sacrifice, Linda Elbow refrained from cleaning her house for four months and put some of the results on display. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 3, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

GLOVER — The Museum of Everyday Life, located in a retired dairy barn just off Route 16 south of Glover Village, opened its fifth season Sunday afternoon in the kind of damp weather that represses the subject of its new exhibit—dust.

In previous years the museum looked through its skewed lens at common items that generally have to be bought — pencils, matches, safety pins, and toothbrushes. Dust is with us whether we like it or not, and the museum’s chief curator, Clare Dolan, offers visitors a chance to examine a multitude of its many aspects.

Samples of coal dust, sawdust, grain dust, and gold dust were elegantly presented under a series of bell jars, along with detailed descriptions of the hazards or benefits each represents….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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contact Joseph Gresser at [email protected]

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Evacuated Union House residents start to return

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A tired firefighter, Alan Quintal of Barton, rests and cools off after coming out of the Union House.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

A tired firefighter, Alan Quintal of Barton, rests and cools off after coming out of the Union House. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle May 20, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

GLOVER — The Union House Nursing Home’s 40 residents, who were evacuated Sunday for what was at first thought to be a fire, will be able to start returning on Wednesday, owner Pat Russell said.

“We just had our inspection, and could start filling beds today,” Ms. Russell said Tuesday.

The nursing home’s occupants were speedily evacuated with help from staff, ambulance squads, law enforcement, and community volunteers who pitched in and helped, Ms. Russell said.

For several hours on Sunday afternoon, lights flashed and sirens blared as ambulances, fire trucks, and emergency responders crowded Glover Village responding to a call from the Union House Nursing Home.…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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In Glover: Select board signs new contract with Sheriff’s Department

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Orleans County Sheriff Kirk Martin signs the contract that returns Sheriff’s Department patrols to Glover.  The town has been without coverage since the end of March.  Select board Chairman Michael Ladd (right) and Selectman Jack Sumberg look on.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Orleans County Sheriff Kirk Martin signs the contract that returns Sheriff’s Department patrols to Glover. The town has been without coverage since the end of March. Select board Chairman Michael Ladd (right) and Selectman Jack Sumberg look on. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle May 20, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

GLOVER — Orleans County Sheriff Kirk Martin came to the Glover Select Board meeting on Thursday, May 14 to sign the town’s new contract with the Sheriff’s Department.

Following a heated discussion at Town Meeting in March, Glover voters elected not to renew the Sheriff’s Department contract when it expired at the end of March. Eventually, they kept $11,700 that had been budgeted for the Sheriff’s Department and said it should be used for “law enforcement.” They authorized the select board to figure out how to proceed.…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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