Bacon pleads innocent in Greensboro killing

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Ryan Bacon (left) and his lawyer, Jon Valsangiacomo, in Orleans Superior Court shortly after Mr. Bacon pled innocent to a first-degree murder charge in the shooting death of his grandfather Lou-Ron Schneider.  Police say Mr. Bacon shot Mr. Schneider Sunday after a quarrel over his grandfather’s relationship with his mother.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Ryan Bacon (left) and his lawyer, Jon Valsangiacomo, in Orleans Superior Court shortly after Mr. Bacon pled innocent to a first-degree murder charge in the shooting death of his grandfather Lou-Ron Schneider. Police say Mr. Bacon shot Mr. Schneider Sunday after a quarrel over his grandfather’s relationship with his mother. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle August 26, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — The man who allegedly shot and killed Lou-Ron Schneider of Greensboro Sunday pled innocent to a first degree murder charge Tuesday and was ordered held without bail.

Police say Mr. Schneider was the shooter’s grandfather, and the two had a dispute about Mr. Schneider’s relationship with his mother.

According to a police press release, after a roughly 24-hour manhunt, Ryan P. Bacon, 30, of Point Pleasant, New Jersey, turned himself in at the Hardwick police station Monday evening and was taken to the Northeast Regional Correctional Facility.

He made a brief appearance in the Criminal Division of Orleans County Superior Court the next morning where his lawyer, Jon Valsangiacomo, entered the innocent plea and reserved the right to argue that Mr. Bacon should be released on bail while awaiting trial.

Judge Timothy Tomasi said the presumption in cases carrying the possibility of a life…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Holding on to the summer

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A glass of mote con huesillo graces a garden on a warm summer morning.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

A glass of mote con huesillo graces a garden on a warm summer morning. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle August 26, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

When it comes to summer I have always been a pessimist. As a child I looked forward to the Fourth of July, but considered the summer over the next day. That was, mind you, in a place where basil keeps growing into October.

Here my pessimism passes for realism. Summer is short and every warm day is precious.

Over the years I have come to realize that I don’t measure time in the summer by the calendar, but instead by where we are on the continuum of summer fruits.

The earliest days of clement weather are marked for me by the emergence of rhubarb stalks, followed, never quickly enough, by strawberries.

After strawberries come blueberries, black currents, then raspberries. Although we are a…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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West Glover high drive collapses

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Pictured here next to the remains of the high drive roof on the left is the Coe family.  James Coe and Nella Cargioli Coe are in the back, and their children Isabella Coe (left) and Jude Coe (right) are in the front.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Pictured here next to the remains of the high drive roof on the left is the Coe family. James Coe and Nella Cargioli Coe are in the back, and their children Isabella Coe (left) and Jude Coe (right) are in the front. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle August 26, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

WEST GLOVER — The old high drive at the Andersonville Farm here collapsed on Thursday, August 13, after an employee drove under it in a “silage dump truck with its tailgate up,” operational owner James Coe said.

“It’s supposed to go down on its own,” he said about the stuck tailgate.

No one was injured in the accident.

“I didn’t know what to think,” said Dennis Poginy, another employee.

He assumed that wind had blown the already weak structure over.

“That’s what you get for leaving the farm,” Mr. Coe said, laughing.

He was at Parker Pie in West Glover with his wife, Nella Cargioli Coe, when the accident happened. They had just celebrated their wedding anniversary the day before.

They’ve been the operating owners since…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Feds sentence Niles to 16 months

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Derick Niles, left, consults with his lawyer, Christopher Davis, at a court hearing in Newport in April 2104.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Derick Niles, left, consults with his lawyer, Christopher Davis, at a court hearing in Newport in April 2104. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle August 19, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

Derick J. Niles, who climbed onto his garage roof in September of 2013 while attempting to hold off an imaginary police posse, will serve 16 months in a federal correctional facility because he is an admitted drug user who carried a .360 caliber rifle up with him.

Mr. Niles, 37, of Newport, was sentenced in U.S. District Court by Judge Christina Reiss after he pled guilty earlier this year to “being an unlawful user of a controlled substance” in possession of a firearm.

Once Mr. Niles leaves prison, his sentence calls for him to serve three years of supervised release. He must submit to a drug test within 15 days of getting out of prison and at least two more tests as required by the court, according to…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Hemenways celebrate 75 years together

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Jim and Shirley Hemenway in the living room of the house where Mr. Hemenway was born and where they have spent 72 of their 75 years together.  Mr. Hemenway is 96, Mrs. Hemenway is 92.  The house is filled with Mr. Hemenway’s woodworking and Mrs. Hemenway’s quilts, along with her collection of blue willow, family photos and many other mementos of a long life. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Jim and Shirley Hemenway in the living room of the house where Mr. Hemenway was born and where they have spent 72 of their 75 years together. Mr. Hemenway is 96, Mrs. Hemenway is 92. The house is filled with Mr. Hemenway’s woodworking and Mrs. Hemenway’s quilts, along with her collection of blue willow, family photos and many other mementos of a long life. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle August 19, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

ORLEANS — The young couple stood in front of the camera on their wedding day. She was very young, dressed like a schoolgirl except for a sequined flapper-style cap and a lace collar livening up the neck of her dress. Her smile was shy but radiant. He was a little older, handsome in his best suit. It was August 20, 1940.

Seventy-five years later, Shirley and Fern “Jim” Hemenway of Orleans looked back at their long life together, which began the day that photo was taken.

They’re about to celebrate an anniversary that few couples see. He is 96, she is 92. He’s hard of hearing now, and has lost much of his vision, but he still has a dry wit. Her feet have lost their lightness and her smile its girlish shyness, but it’s still the biggest thing about her.

Over the years, the couple has raised six children — three biological children, and…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Kidder Hill wind project draw fierce opposition

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Pictured here, David Blittersdorf, the professional wind developer who plans to put up the turbines and owns the land they would be sited on, came to the meeting but was not allowed to speak. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Pictured here, David Blittersdorf, the professional wind developer who plans to put up the turbines and owns the land they would be sited on, came to the meeting but was not allowed to speak. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle August 12, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

IRASBURG — About 40 people, including two state legislators, came to the Irasburg Select Board meeting on Monday night to protest two commercial scale wind towers proposed for nearby Kidder Hill.

David Blittersdorf, the professional wind developer who plans to put up the turbines and owns the land they would be sited on, also came to the meeting but was not allowed to speak.  After listening to well over an hour of public comments, the select board agreed to have some answers at its next meeting to questions about exactly what the town can and cannot do regarding wind development.

Kidder Hill is about four miles northwest of Irasburg. The two towers would produce…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Heath Orchard apples destroyed by hailstorms

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Heath Orchard in Canada lost nearly its entire crop for this year after three hailstorms hit in three weeks.  Updates on when the orchard will be open this year will be posted on their website at vergerheathorchard.com.  Photo by Xander Jean

Heath Orchard in Canada lost nearly its entire crop for this year after three hailstorms hit in three weeks. Updates on when the orchard will be open this year will be posted on their website at vergerheathorchard.com. Photo by Xander Jean

copyright the Chronicle August 12, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph 

STANSTEAD, QUEBEC — Picking apples at Heath Orchard in Canada is a tradition for many, but this year will be different.

The 100-year-old orchard was hit hard by three separate hailstorms — one in mid-July and two in early August — that destroyed or damaged the entire crop.

“When the first storm came, we were in shock,” co-owner Chris Rawlings said. “When the second one came, we started crying. When the third one came….”

He threw his hands into the air as if to say, what can you do?

He and his wife and co-owner, Lynn Heath, run the orchard.

“This is uncharted territory,” Ms. Heath said.

Nothing like this has ever happened in…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Jazz brings Newport waterfront to life

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Someone has to hit the floor first, and a single small dancer was the one Saturday night soon after Mimi and the Podd Brothers took the stage.  The quartet composed of Owen Broder on saxophone, Adam Podd on bass, vocalist Mimi Hillaire, and keyboard player Matt Podd was up from their base in Brooklyn, New York, to play at the Newport, Vermont, Jazz Festival, but for the brothers it was a return home.  They played twice during a weekend that brought music and the city’s waterfront to life.  For more about the festival, please see page twelve.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Someone has to hit the floor first, and a single small dancer was the one Saturday night soon after Mimi and the Podd Brothers took the stage. The quartet composed of Owen Broder on saxophone, Adam Podd on bass, vocalist Mimi Hillaire, and keyboard player Matt Podd was up from their base in Brooklyn, New York, to play at the Newport, Vermont, Jazz Festival, but for the brothers it was a return home. They played twice during a weekend that brought music and the city’s waterfront to life. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle August 12, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — Everyone who’s spent time in Newport realizes the city’s greatest asset is its location on the shore of the spectacularly beautiful Lake Memphremagog. Nevertheless, generations of builders have put up structures that turn their backs on the water, and valiant efforts to draw people to the waterfront have met with mixed success.

That changed in at least a small way Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, when the Newport, Vermont, Jazz Festival held its first season. The promise of live music drew a broad cross section of people to the Gateway Center and…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Remembering the last log drive on the Connecticut

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Where else but a log drive would a team of horses be rafted down a river?  Photo from Bill Gove’s book Log Drives on the Connecticut River

Where else but a log drive would a team of horses be rafted down a river? Photo from Bill Gove’s book Log Drives on the Connecticut River

copyright the Chronicle August 12, 2015

by Paul Lefebvre

The Northeast Kingdom has often been called the state’s last frontier, but where do we turn to find the bigger than life characters or the tall tales that go into making up a frontier? There are still people alive who remember individual heroics either in the mills or on the railroad tracks, but what is it about the Kingdom that fires a schoolboy’s imagination when he reads about its past?

When anyone mentions frontier, it’s usually the West that readily comes to mind. We know its famous characters from Wyatt Earp and Billy the Kid to the more legendary Stagger Lee or Frankie and Johnny. Cowboys and cattle, lawmen and…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Youngsters get a look at Abenaki culture

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Summer reading program participants gathered around the fire they made to cook bannock bread on sticks.  Pictured here, from left to right, are Kayleigh Cole, Isabella Cole, Cienna Bishop, Owen Sheltra, Brielle Rancourt, and Trevor Sanville.  Directly behind Owen are Chase Sheltra who is looking at his dough-covered stick, and Dale Guisinger, who is digging into a Tupperware for more dough to hand out.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Summer reading program participants gathered around the fire they made to cook bannock bread on sticks. Pictured here, from left to right, are Kayleigh Cole, Isabella Cole, Cienna Bishop, Owen Sheltra, Brielle Rancourt, and Trevor Sanville. Directly behind Owen are Chase Sheltra who is looking at his dough-covered stick, and Dale Guisinger, who is digging into a Tupperware for more dough to hand out. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle August 5, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

ISLAND POND — Archery, kayaking, circus arts, and bread-making are just a few of the activities organized by the Island Pond Public Library as part of its summer reading program.

The books the kids read are associated with an activity so they can experience the book hands-on, Library Director John Zuppa said.

On Friday, about 15 kids discovered a book about bears then joined their counselor on the shore of Island Pond to learn how to make a fire and cook bannock bread the way Abenakis did.

“That really gets through to them in a real way,” Mr. Zuppa said about linking a book to an activity.

The idea is to get the kids excited about reading, he said.

And it worked. During Friday’s activity, the children’s attention span was…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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