On TV with a cake and a paint roller

Featured

copyright the Chronicle March 16, 2016

by Tena Starr

TROY – Jennifer LeBlanc has been described as something of an overachiever.  And that, she said, likely played a role in her appearance last week on The Rachael Ray Show with a paint roller and a cake.

For the few who don’t know, Rachael Ray is a Food Network celebrity and chef with a nationally syndicated TV talk show.

By profession, Ms. LeBlanc is an auditor, one of only five people in Vermont who audits special education accounts and trains people.  It’s a rather dry job, she said, with her own rather dry humor, which is generally followed by peals of laughter.

Baking cakes, which she’s done for around 20 years, is her creative outlet, she said at her home Friday.  She makes gorgeous event cakes, destined…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspape

Share

In Holland: Meeting set to discuss failed school budget

Featured

copyright the Chronicle March 9, 2016

by Tena Starr

HOLLAND – The school board here plans to hold a public meeting on Monday, March 14, at 6 p.m.  Board members hope that Holland’s voters will tell them how to move forward in the wake of last week’s budget defeat, or at least why they voted the way they did.

The budget, which is voted on by Australian ballot, was rejected 94-79 despite the fact that it had been cut by about $80,000 from the previous year.

At the same time, Holland voters approved their share of the North Country Union High School and junior high school budgets.

The town school budget was down for the second year in a row, but because of…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspape

Share

Troy Town Meeting: Voters opt to buy property for preschool

Featured

copyright the Chronicle March 2, 2016

by Tena Starr

NORTH TROY – Following a fairly long and typically feisty discussion, voters at Town Meeting here Tuesday agreed to spend $76,000 to buy the so-called Allen property, a lot and house adjacent to the school.

The short-term plan is to use the property for a preschool.

An attempt to cut how much the town pays for… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

Forestry bills go after the bad guys

Featured

copyright the Chronicle February 24, 2016

by Tena Starr

MONTPELIER — Legislation aimed at pinching the bad guys in the forestry business, while protecting the good guys from nuisance suits and dust-ups with zoning laws, is winding its way through the Vermont House at the moment.

In its current form, it would affect not only loggers, but also landowners who use loggers, and the mills that buy from loggers.

Orleans County loggers are leery of the legislation, but Commissioner of Forests, Parks and Recreation Michael Snyder views it as a tool aimed at protecting loggers’ right to do business.

H.584, which has an identical counterpart in the Senate, started out as one big bill, but has since been broken into pieces in the House so it can more easily pass through committees. And it’s rapidly changing as it proceeds.… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

30 years in the air took this man everywhere

Featured

copyright the Chronicle February 17, 2016

by Tena Starr

Armand Brasseur grew up on a dairy farm in Irasburg, but he didn’t want to milk cows, he wanted to fly.  He knew that when he was a small boy, four or five years old, and watched planes head south from the airport in Newport.

“I cherished my military soldier with a parachute and balsa wood plane with a rubber band as its source of power,” he said.

He was a Northeast Kingdom farm boy, and not many considered either the dream, or the ability to realize it, realistic.

They were wrong.  It took some doing… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

Outage created plenty of work for plumbers

Featured

copyright the Chronicle February 17, 2016

by Tena Starr

It was a perfect trifecta of bad luck – the coldest day of the year by far, not enough snow to insulate foundations, and an outage that left roughly 1,500 Vermont Electric Cooperative (VEC) members without power for about 12 hours Sunday.  Barton and Orleans electric customers were out as well.

A day later, or a day earlier, and it might have been a different story.  But by Sunday afternoon… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

Backus brothers bring business to Westfield

Featured

From left to right are Merlin Backus, Rebecca Velazquez, and Luke Backus of Westfield along with some of Merlin and Rebecca’s goats. Luke plans to turn this old barn into a distillery. Photo by Tena Starr

From left to right are Merlin Backus, Rebecca Velazquez, and Luke Backus of Westfield along with some of Merlin and Rebecca’s goats. Luke plans to turn this old barn into a distillery. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle February 10, 2016

by Tena Starr   

WESTFIELD — Not long ago Rebecca Velazquez, who grew up in New Jersey, found herself in this very rural small town near tears, struggling to milk an uncooperative goat.

She was an urban woman, never even had a dog, she said.  And there she was in Westfield, population about 400, with two nanny goats that had to be milked and a partner who was out of state visiting his grandfather.

Ms. Velazquez’s partner is Merlin Backus, who grew up on a homestead farm in Westfield.  As a youngster, he hadn’t envisioned himself still living in that small town as a grownup.

But after college in New York City where he studied writing, and some years living there with Rebecca — a couple of those years traveling back and forth between New York and Vermont to care for his sick mother — he’s returned home.

So has his brother Luke, who also left… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

 

Share

How hard is it to buy a gun?

Featured

copyright the Chronicle January 13, 2016

by Tena Starr  

A couple of months ago I became the owner of a World War II issue Yugoslavian Mauser.

The story behind that unlikely purchase is complicated, but part of it had to do with the San Bernardino shootings.

Aware that the gun control debate was about to start up again, I wondered just how hard, or easy, it actually is to buy a gun.

One way to find out was to buy one.

Even though I grew up in Vermont in a family with a gun cabinet, went hunting with my father as a kid, and made sure both my children knew how to shoot, I had never owned, or bought, a gun.

So I asked about the Mauser, got a break on the price, and bought it.

This is what it entailed: I filled out the paperwork, which isn’t lengthy, and basically asks… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

The Donald does Vermont

Featured

Trump-protestors-cmykcopyright the Chronicle January 13, 2016

by Tena Starr  

BURLINGTON — Not surprisingly, given the candidate’s career, Donald Trump’s rally here last week resembled a reality TV show as much as a political rally.

Mr. Trump bragged about the 20,000 people who had lined up to see him.

Actually, according to Burlington Police, that number was closer to 2,000.

His campaign had issued 20,000 free tickets, and many ticket holders believed that a ticket translated into entrance to the venue.

It did not. Hundreds of people stood in line outside for hours and many were denied entrance because the 1,400-seat venue was full.

It filled slowly, since everyone who made it to the doors had to go through airport level security, including body scans and bag searches.

“I love my people,” Mr. Trump said shortly after we walked in. “They are the most loyal people.”

Anyone who did not exhibit that loyalty, however, was ushered, bodily if necessary… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

1,000 pounds of onions stolen from Albany farmer

Featured

Andy Paonessa at one of his farm fields.  Last week someone stole about 1,000 pounds of onions and shallots from him and his soon-to-be wife, Meghan Stotko.  Photo by Tena Starr

Andy Paonessa at one of his farm fields. Last week someone stole about 1,000 pounds of onions and shallots from him and his soon-to-be wife, Meghan Stotko. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle September 23, 2015

by Tena Starr

ALBANY — A puzzled Albany farmer is wondering why anyone would want to steal nearly 1,000 pounds of onions.

Andy Paonessa arrived at one of his farm fields last week to top and crate onions and discovered that he had been robbed of about $2,000 worth of onions and shallots.

“I looked around and thought there’s a lot missing. I looked down at my feet, and I was looking down at tire tracks.”

It turned out that about 1,000 pounds of onions that had been pulled, topped, and crated up for further drying had vanished. There were, and still are, clear tracks indicating that someone with a truck drove in and simply took 20 crates of onions and shallots from the field.

“I said, oh my God, we got robbed out of the field,” Mr. Paonessa said.

He said his workers scratched their heads.

Even the State Police were a… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share