Presentation on beekeeping April 9

People can learn all about working with bees, just as a hobby or as a more serious endeavor, at the Goodrich Memorial Library in Newport on Saturday, April 9, at 10:30 a.m.

The concern over the disappearance of local bee populations has greatly increased interest in beekeeping by farmers and gardeners who depend on bees for the pollination of plants.

Jim Reed, a local registered apiary owner, will present a pictorial and verbal description of his experience as a first-year beekeeper. From start-up to harvest and all the bumps in between, Mr. Reed will guide the audience through a year of honey making. His presentation will suggest ways of getting started, possible costs, the learning curve, time requirements, and more.

Mr. Reed is a lifelong resident of the area and previous owner of Reeds Mobil; owner of Up the Creek Paddle Sports in Newport, and Kamptokumto vacation rentals in Jay. He has also been a previous officer and director of the Derby Fish and Game Club.

Any interested persons are welcome.

All donations will benefit the Goodrich Memorial Library.

Visit utcbees on Facebook for a preview. — from the Goodrich.

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Stenger says Newport plans are on track

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copyright the Chronicle April 6, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT – Bill Stenger says his plans for Newport are on track, although those related to the AnC Bio facility are undergoing some modifications in reaction to changes in the direction of biomedical technology.

In a conversation Monday, just after he returned from seeking investors in South Africa, Mr. Stenger said plans have been modified to allow the facility to manufacture products for gene therapy products in addition to those based on stem cells.

Gene therapy requires changes to “air flow, water flow, and people flow” in the plant, he said.

Mr. Stenger said the design modifications are necessary to keep pace…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Starry Mountain Singers in Newport April 3

The Starry Mountain Singers will host a concert at the United Church of Newport on Sunday, April 3, at 4 p.m. The suggested donation is $10 to $15.

The Starry Mountain Singers is an ensemble of seven vocalists who perform a wide range of traditional music from around the United States and the wider world. Formed in 2010, the group’s members are all lifelong musicians who share a deep love of traditional vocal styles and a dedication to studying and performing these types of polyphony.

Their performances are known to be dynamic, uplifting and powerful. The musical program features traditional songs from the United States and Europe — specifically Corsica and Caucasus Georgia. The American repertoire includes shape-note songs (a traditional New England song style), powerful gospel numbers, cowboy songs, and haunting folk tunes from the Appalachians. The Georgian and Corsican songs are a mixture of sacred and secular pieces that demonstrate the incredible range of unique singing traditions from those countries. Each member has contributed songs from their particular area of musical knowledge and expertise, resulting in a dynamic and eclectic program that will delight world-music fans and lovers of choral performance. Their recent, self-titled studio album will be available at the show.

The Starry Mountain Singers have all toured extensively with the Vermont-based world-music ensembles Northern Harmony and Village Harmony, where they received an introduction to traditional songs and singing styles from around the world. In addition, all members of the ensemble have worked extensively with Northern Harmony, as well as Meredith Monk, Revels, Inc., and have performed on “A Prairie Home Companion” and “Mountain Stage,” and include three members of the Brooklyn-based country band, The Sweetback Sisters.  – from the Starry Mountain Singers.

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Orleans County is unhealthiest in Vermont

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copyright the Chronicle March 23, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT – When Julie Raboin stood up at Monday’s city council meeting and talked about a recent study showing Orleans County at the bottom of the state’s health rankings, Newport resident Brian McNeal had a question.

He noted reports of another study that ranked the state as second healthiest in the nation, behind Hawaii, and asked about the incidence of cancer.

Ms. Raboin, who is a substance abuse prevention consultant working at the Vermont Department of Health’s Newport office, explained that the study, prepared by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation of Princeton, New Jersey, bases its rankings on a different set of factors.

On Tuesday, Ms. Raboin offered a visitor to the Department of Health a guided tour of the study’s findings, explaining how the foundation’s examination of counties across…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Newport City Council: Wilson passed over for council president

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copyright the Chronicle March 9, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT – The first council meeting after Newport’s annual meeting usually begins with a drowsy run of reappointments to a wide variety of city offices.  That pattern was broken Monday when Alderman Steven Vincent passed over the incumbent, Alderman John Wilson, to nominate Alderman Neil Morrissette as president of the council.

Alderman Jacques Roberge seconded the nomination, and Mr. Wilson was effectively removed from the position, which he’s held since Paul Monette was elected Mayor in 2009.

City council president is largely an honorary title except when the mayor is absent…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Dogs keep up the spirit at the Bel-Aire

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Resident Evelyn Jenne enjoys some lap time with Shadow, a tiny three-year-old shih tzu.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Resident Evelyn Jenne enjoys some lap time with Shadow, a tiny three-year-old shih tzu. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle January 6, 2016

by Elizabeth Trail

NEWPORT — When tiny Shadow, a three-year-old shih tzu, can’t be found, everyone at the Bel-Aire Quality Care Center in Newport knows where to look for him.

Shadow has a favorite person among the residents and can usually be found on her bed. In fact, he’s a little bit protective of her.

Dogs are everywhere at the Bel-Aire. Or at least it seems that way. Dogs are carrying their toys through the halls, greeting visitors, and getting hugs from seniors in wheelchairs.

The four dogs that are there during the day — dogs who belong to Bel-Aire employees — are an integral part of everyday life.

“I love the dogs. We always had dogs at home,” resident Evelyn Jenne said. Ms. Jenne is legally blind, so she can’t see the dogs clearly, but she enjoys petting and holding them.

Many people are familiar with the idea of therapy dogs coming to visit at hospitals and nursing homes.

Official therapy dogs have to… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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An eclectic new bookstore comes to Newport

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Local poet Larry Bradley adjusts part of his window decor in the new Nevermore Bookstore in Newport. The store is named for the famous poem “The Raven,” by Edgar Allen Poe. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Local poet Larry Bradley adjusts part of his window decor in the new Nevermore Bookstore in Newport. The store is named for the famous poem “The Raven,” by Edgar Allen Poe. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle December 22, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

NEWPORT — If the secret to business success is location, location, location, the Nevermore Bookstore in Newport has a tough road ahead. It’s out of sight on East Main Street, behind Buzzy’s Beverage and Redemption Store. It’s not going to get foot traffic, and not many people are going to just accidentally stumble on the place.

But proprietor Larry Bradley hopes that book lovers in Newport will be willing to go the extra mile to find his shop.

In spirit, the Nevermore Bookstore is a lot like Rivendell books in Montpelier used to be, or the Crow Bookstore in Burlington — an eclectic mix of new and used books, arranged to invite browsing and discovery.

Offerings range from poetry and fiction through biography, travel, spiritual, nonfiction, and memoir. In fact, there’s something for just about everyone, including children… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Veterans remember Pearl Harbor

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Inspired by Charles Lindbergh’s historic transatlantic flight, Lindy Palin dreamed of flying ever since he was a boy.  As part of the Eighth Air Force, Mr. Palin flew bombing missions over Europe from a base in England, one of the few pilots to survive his 35 missions unscathed, although he ended up in a prisoner of war camp after a forced landing.  He wears the Army Air Corps hat in memory of a friend.  Photos by Elizabeth Trail

Inspired by Charles Lindbergh’s historic transatlantic flight, Lindy Palin dreamed of flying ever since he was a boy. As part of the Eighth Air Force, Mr. Palin flew bombing missions over Europe from a base in England, one of the few pilots to survive his 35 missions unscathed, although he ended up in a prisoner of war camp after a forced landing. He wears the Army Air Corps hat in memory of a friend. Photos by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle December 9, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

NEWPORT — As the years pass, fewer and fewer people are alive who remember what they were doing when they heard the news of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.

On Monday morning, 74 years later, Army Sergeant Major Retired John Wilson of Newport had to stop and remind several local businesses that Pearl Harbor Day is one of the handful of days of the year when flags must be flown at half-mast.

Mr. Wilson is a Vietnam combat veteran. He wasn’t even born on that long ago morning when Japanese bombers struck an American base in Hawaii, killing over 2,500 Americans. It was the event that brought the United States into World War II.

But at the Bel Aire Quality Care Nursing Center in Newport, men and women who still remember Pearl Harbor gathered in the common room at 2 p.m. Monday to share their memories of that day, and of the parts they… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Newport hosts lively Aquafest

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Rainbow arcs through the air toward the finish line and a $50 prize for the frog’s young coach, Anna Kate Costo.  Anna Kate found that blowing on Rainbow was an excellent way to stimulate the amphibian’s competitive instincts.  The frog-jumping contest was only one of many events at Newport’s Aquafest on Saturday.  To find out more about the event and about Shredfest, which took place nearby, please see page sixteen.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Rainbow arcs through the air toward the finish line and a $50 prize for the frog’s young coach, Anna Kate Costo. Anna Kate found that blowing on Rainbow was an excellent way to stimulate the amphibian’s competitive instincts. The frog-jumping contest was only one of many events at Newport’s Aquafest on Saturday. To find out more about the event and about Shredfest, which took place nearby, please see page sixteen. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle August 5, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — Early Saturday morning it looked as if Aquafest might be a cruel joke, with the water its title celebrates raining down from the sky. As it turned out, only a couple of brief showers marred what was, for this summer, a beautiful day.

Sadly, it appeared that many of those who might otherwise have thronged to Newport’s Main Street in search of community fun held back due to fear of gray skies. Their caution caused them to miss an enjoyable street fair.

The day began with a demonstration of gravity-powered vehicles — Soap Box Derby race cars. Cars driven by current drivers and stars of the past made repeated runs down Main Street under the watchful eye of Dr. Fred Turcotte, who…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Aquafest in Newport

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Soldiers Anthony DeGreenia and Justin Roy (left to right) of the Vermont National Guard, had special permission to appear in less than regulation uniform when they competed in the VT105 Challenge race at the 2014 edition of the Aquafest.  As part of the race, they took a selfie at Pick and Shovel in Newport, with an iguana in the background.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Soldiers Anthony DeGreenia and Justin Roy (left to right) of the Vermont National Guard, had special permission to appear in less than regulation uniform when they competed in the VT105 Challenge race at the 2014 edition of the Aquafest. As part of the race, they took a selfie at Pick and Shovel in Newport, with an iguana in the background. Photo by Joseph Gresser

Newport’s Aquafest 2015, sponsored by Vermont’s North Country Chamber of Commerce and NorthCountry Federal Credit Union, will take place on Saturday, August 1, in Newport.

Events include the Waterfront Festival commencing at 11 a.m. along the boardwalk of Lake Memphremagog. Vendors, family entertainment, and live entertainment.

Chowderfest will be held at the Gateway Center in Newport from noon to 2 p.m. where locals compete in the chowder competition. Buy a spoon for $5 and dig into a variety of chowders entered to win. The VT 105 Amazing Race Challenge is a fun and exciting race that includes challenges such as eating large amounts of food, counting a large number of items, finding an item/items or people, finding a shop or location, carrying items long distances, assembling a difficult structure, or solving riddles in order to get the next clue and protect your balloon at all costs!

A Plein Air Event (French for “open air”) will be presented by the Wooden Horse Arts Guild and artists from anywhere are invited to “paint outdoors in natural light” in and around Newport during Aquafest.

For more information about Aquafest activities, visit www.northcountry.org or call Lynne Bertrand at (802) 334-7782.

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