History students take a stand

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copyright the Chronicle March 22, 2017

 

by Elizabeth Trail

  

NEWPORT — In 1967, authorities tried to drag Kathrine Switzer off the course in the middle of the Boston Marathon because she was a woman.

Women weren’t officially allowed to run in the event until 1972. Ms. Switzer had gotten a race number by filling out the entry form with just her initials.

Robin Nelson, an eighth-grader at Glover Community School, won a first prize in the NEK History Day fair in Newport last Thursday for her research on Ms. Switzer.

In just a few weeks, Robin and the rest of her family will be in Boston cheering her mother, Tara Nelson, across the finish line.

Of the 30,000 entries in this year’s race, about half with be women.

Ms. Switzer, who went on to win both the Boston and New York marathons after they were opened to women, took a stand for equality in her sport, Robin said.

But Robin’s choice of project highlights another trend at this year’s NEK History Day event.

Maybe it was the theme of this year’s national and local history day events — “take a stand for history.” Or maybe it was the recent election, the national political climate, and the widely publicized women’s marches around the country.

But just over a third of the projects entered in this year’s NEK History Day were about women.

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North Country wins hockey title

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copyright the Chronicle March 15, 2017

 

Congratulations to the North Country boys’ hockey team — 2017 Division II champions. The Falcons skated to a 4-3 win over a high-powered Harwood Union team on March 9 at UVM’s Gutterson Field House.

North Country opened up a 3-0 lead midway through the contest on a pair of goals by Brady Perron, and a goal and an assist by Dawson Cote. Harwood battled back to tie the game with three unanswered goals. But Mitchell Austin netted the game-winner for the Falcons with about nine minutes to play. Goaltender Dana Marsh finished with 45 saves, breaking a longstanding record for the D-II finals.

The Falcons went 14-5 during the regular season to earn the fourth seed in D-II. Marsh earned a 2-0 shutout over Milton in the opening round of the playoffs at the Jay Peak Ice Haus on March 4, with Brady Perron and Mitchell Gonyaw scoring for the Falcons.

On March 7, North Country upset top-seeded Hartford 6-3 at the Wendell A. Barwood Arena in Hartford to earn its first crack at a championship since losing to Harwood in the 2005 finals. Jordan Cote scored in the closing seconds of the second period to knot that game at two goals apiece, and Alex Giroux took over in the third with three straight goals including the eventual game winner. Tyler Smith and Brady Perron also scored in the semifinal.

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NCUHS search for principal narrowed to two

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copyright the Chronicle January 25, 2017

 

by Joseph Gresser

 

NEWPORT—The committee set up to find a new principal for North Country Union High School narrowed the field to two applicants at its meeting Monday night. At a meeting earlier this month the 16-member group picked four potential leaders for the school from an original group of 16, according to North Country Supervisory Union Superintendent John Castle.

The committee interviewed all four before deciding to place the names of Chris Miller and Jessica Puckett before the high school board for its consideration.

Ms. Puckett already works at North Country, serving both as director of special programs and as one-third of the tri-principal group that has been leading the high school this year. The other two in the group are assistant principals Anita Mayhew and Bob Davis.

Mr. Castle said that neither Ms. Mayhew nor Mr. Davis applied for the job.

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Jay 14-year-old is women’s amateur national flowboarding champion

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copyright the Chronicle September 7, 2016

by Elizabeth Trail

JAY — Monica Caffrey is tiny, muscular, and tanned. She’s 14 years old, and an eighth-grader at North Country Union Junior High School. And she was recently crowned the amateur women’s national flowboarding champion.

Flowboarding — also called flowriding — hasn’t been around as an organized sport much longer than Monica’s been alive.

It’s somewhere between skateboarding and surfing. The board is like a small finless surfboard. The moves are straight out of skateboarding right down to the names.

But it’s done on the water — specifically on an artificial 35-mile-an-hour vertical wave, called a sheet wave, that can curl over at the top like a breaking wave on the beach.

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Citizens hope to keep NCUHS school resource officer

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copyright the Chronicle August 24, 2016

 

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — SRO stands for school resource officer, but it could have meant standing room only at Monday’s Newport City Council meeting. More than 50 people, including a large number of teachers, staff members, parents, and students from North Country Union High School showed up to express their displeasure at Newport Police Chief Seth DiSanto’s decision to pull one of his officer from permanent duty at the high school.

They were heard by Chief DiSanto and the council, but the decision remained unchanged at the end of the evening. The chief apologized for making his decision so close to the opening of school, but promised not to leave North Country in the lurch.

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North Country band plays at Disney World

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©the Chronicle, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

For 53 members of the North Country Union High School band, last week’s flying trip to perform at Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Florida, was an adventure they had worked toward for three years. For the 20 adult chaperones, it was a five-day challenge in planning and logistics.

For everyone, band director Bill Prue said the day after the group got back, it was exciting, exhausting, and utterly worthwhile.

This is the North Country band’s fifth trip to Orlando to participate in the Disney Performing Arts Program. Bands, vocal ensembles, and dance troupes from all over the country apply to get into the merit-based program.

The students go to a four-hour workshop one day, and then get to perform in the bandstand at Disney Springs, an area of the resort that used to be called Main Street Disney World. In between their musical obligations, they can enjoy Disney World’s other attractions.

“These kids have known since they were freshmen that they’d be going on this trip,” Mr. Prue said.

He thinks that the trip is a great motivation to keep students in the band throughout their high school careers.

Over the past three years, students have worked hard, both to make the band good enough to meet Disney’s high standards…….

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Relay for Life: Over 400 join the fight against cancer

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The American Cancer Society’s Northeast Kingdom edition of Relay for Life took place in Newport on Saturday night.  Luminarias commemorating cancer victims and survivors were placed along the track at North Country Union High School and lit at nightfall.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

The American Cancer Society’s Northeast Kingdom edition of Relay for Life took place in Newport on Saturday night. Luminarias commemorating cancer victims and survivors were placed along the track at North Country Union High School and lit at nightfall. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 1, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT — The luminaria-lined track at North Country Union High School (NCUHS) was filled with people of all ages talking and laughing Saturday night as they walked to raise money to fight cancer.

Ice-filled kiddie pools at either end of the track kept water bottles cold so participants could rehydrate during their trek.

By Saturday morning 323 people had signed up for the American Cancer Society’s 12-hour Relay for Life in advance. In the evening, 89 more signed up in person, and others came to walk without signing in, or simply to buy a luminaria bag. The relay lasts all night.

People who are signed up are grouped into teams. Thirty-five teams raised…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Perkins wins titanium in national dance competition

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Kendra Perkins is wearing the medal she won in Sheer Talent national competition in Las Vegas in July.  Behind her are some of her dance photos and trophies.  Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

Kendra Perkins is wearing the medal she won in Sheer Talent national competition in Las Vegas in July. Behind her are some of her dance photos and trophies. Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

copyright the Chronicle August 6, 2014

by Bethany M. Dunbar

DERBY — At age 19, Kendra Perkins was no stranger to national dance competition. She had been there four times before.

July 7 to 12 was her fifth time at the Sheer Talent competition, and she came home from Las Vegas with a titanium medal. Her score was 298 out of a possible 300 points from three judges.

“I came off the stage and I was bawling,” she said. She thought she had done badly. A perfectionist, she often reviews videos of herself dancing to try to improve. It turns out she did pretty well, even though she wasn’t satisfied herself.

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