Barton Village annual meeting: Village gets bigger, new trustee elected

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copyright the Chronicle March 9, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

BARTON – Barton Village is a little big bigger than it was before its annual meeting Tuesday night.  By a vote of 23 to 1 residents voted to incorporate a small piece of land near the intersection of Route 16 and the Roaring Brook Road into the village.

The adjustment to the village charter was decided by Australian ballot and must still be ratified by the Legislature before it becomes final, but it is one of the final steps before the old Roaring Brook Road bridge is replaced with a new span.

Voters also elected Cathy Swain, a new resident to the village, to fill the seat vacated by Trustee Ryan Longe.  Mr. Longe, who…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Newport City Council: Wilson passed over for council president

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copyright the Chronicle March 9, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT – The first council meeting after Newport’s annual meeting usually begins with a drowsy run of reappointments to a wide variety of city offices.  That pattern was broken Monday when Alderman Steven Vincent passed over the incumbent, Alderman John Wilson, to nominate Alderman Neil Morrissette as president of the council.

Alderman Jacques Roberge seconded the nomination, and Mr. Wilson was effectively removed from the position, which he’s held since Paul Monette was elected Mayor in 2009.

City council president is largely an honorary title except when the mayor is absent…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Clerk foils armed robbery

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copyright the Chronicle February 24, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

GREENSBORO BEND — Police say Joshua L. Chase-Renault walked into Smith’s Store in Greensboro Bend on the evening of February 8 carrying a knife and intending to rob the place.

But Mr. Chase-Renault left the store in a hurry when the clerk pulled out a handgun, said Hardwick Police Detective Kevin Lehoe.

Not only was the clerk armed, but also Hardwick Sergeant Michael Glodgett was watching the store from the parking lot of a sawmill across the street. When he saw a man run out of the store and jump into a car he followed, but gave up the chase after losing him on Stannard Mountain Road.… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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In Holland: School budget is down, tax rate is up

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copyright the Chronicle February 24, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

HOLLAND — The Holland School Board has crafted a budget for the town’s elementary school that reduces spending by nearly $80,000 compared to last year. Working with a very sharp pencil, they reduced the elementary school’s budget from the $1.02-million voters approved last year to about $963,000.

As a result, the portion of the town’s education rate assigned to the elementary school will be down by a smidgen more than one cent per hundred dollars of assessed value.

Overall, though, Holland’s education tax rate is likely to rise by 17 cents per hundred dollars of assessed value. The steep increase is due to a couple of factors… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Sanders, Clinton speak at Democratic Party fund-raiser

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Supporters of Senator Sanders engage in a friendly competition with their rivals across the arena.  Each group tried to better the level of enthusiasm shown by partisans of the opposing candidate.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Supporters of Senator Sanders engage in a friendly competition with their rivals across the arena. Each group tried to better the level of enthusiasm shown by partisans of the opposing candidate. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle February 10, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

MANCHESTER, NEW HAMPSHIRE — The New Hampshire Democratic Party took advantage of the fact that it’s a presidential election year and booked both national candidates to speak at the party’s big annual fund-raising event.  Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders never shared the stage Friday, but they did draw a big crowd on a wintery day.

Hosting the first Primary in the nation, which a former Democratic Party chair told the crowd was “the way God meant it to be,” gets Vermont’s neighbor a lot of attention from presidential candidates, who make repeated visits to the state.

Secretary Clinton and Senator Sanders have each held more than 80 events in New Hampshire since the campaign began.

Friday evening both were booked to appear… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Evidence room burglar could get up to 25 years

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copyright the Chronicle January 27, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT – A 20-year-old Newport man faces between eight and 25 years in prison for looting the evidence room at the Newport City Police Station and participating in a burglary spree that hit homes and businesses in Lowell and Troy.

Mikeal Rivers pled guilty or no contest to a string of felonies Tuesday in the Criminal Division of Orleans County Superior Court here.  His plea agreement allows him to contest the length of the sentence proposed by the state.

Should Judge Howard VanBenthuysen decide a long term is merited, Mr. Rivers would…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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In NCSU: Most towns can expect to see lower tax rate

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copyright the Chroniocle January 20, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

DERBY – The board of North Country Union High School and the North Country Career Center have something of a late Christmas gift for area voters – a budget that is 2.34 percent lower than that approved last year.

As most local residents know, a lower budget does not always translate into lower property taxes.  But North Country Supervisory Union Director of Business and Finance Glenn Hankinson predicts most of the towns in the high school union should see…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Glover woman qualifies to compete in Olympic trials

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Leah Frost stands before a few of the many race bibs that decorate a wall of her Glover apartment.  Photos by Joseph Gresser

Leah Frost stands before a few of the many race bibs that decorate a wall of her Glover apartment. Photos by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle December 16, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

GLOVER — Leah Frost, who won the title of “Fastest Woman in Glover” at the 2013 and 2014 Glover Day Chamberlain Run, has earned the chance to match her mettle against some of her running heroes. A time of 2:42:52 in the California International Marathon means she has qualified to compete in trials for a slot on the U.S. Women’s Olympic Team.

The race was held in Sacramento, California, on December 6.

Ms. Frost, who lives in Glover, said Monday that she is under no illusion that she will be one of those chosen to represent the U.S. in the 2016 Olympic Games to be held in Rio De Janeiro next August. To do that, she said, would require her to cut around 20 minutes from her time.

If the weather stays as it has been and she’s able to train hard, Ms. Frost said she… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Shooter in O’Hagan killing sentenced to 23 to 50 years

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Michael Norrie sits at the defense table during a recess at his sentencing hearing. Photos by Joseph Gresser

Michael Norrie sits at the defense table during a recess at his sentencing hearing. Photos by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle December 9, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

ST. JOHNSBURY — The man who admitted firing the shot that killed Mary Pat O’Hagan will spend at least 22 years in prison. Judge Robert Gerety, sitting in the Caledonia Criminal Division of Superior Court on December 3, accepted the plea agreement worked out between Michael Norrie, 25, of Sheffield, and the state.

His sentence calls for a 23-to-50-year term, all but 23 years of which will be suspended. Mr. Norrie will be credited with time already served, about one year, according to Caledonia County State’s Attorney Lisa Warren.

In July Mr. Norrie pled guilty to burglary, kidnapping, and first-degree murder in the slaying of Mrs. O’Hagan, a 78-year-old Sheffield resident. The sentencing agreement was put forward at that time, but Judge Robert Bent, who was serving in Caledonia County, asked for a pre-sentence investigation before approving the deal.

Judge Gerety, in signing off on the… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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An old song becomes a new classic

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WEB freeman book cmykcopyright the Chronicle November 25, 2015

The Devil In The Valley, by Castle Freeman. Published by Overlook Duckworth, New York City and London, 2015. Hardcover, 191 pages, $24.95.

Reviewed by Joseph Gresser

In jazz there are tunes known as standards. Those songs usually have harmonic structures that musicians find interesting. The point of the standards for the performer is not just to play them, but also to fashion them into a new, original composition.

In literature, the story of Doctor Faust is something of a standard. Since at least the time of Christopher Marlowe, writers have taken the tale of the man who sells his soul to the devil and remade it to suit their own purposes.

As the plot is usually set out a man offers up his immortal soul and, in exchange, gets his heart’s desire. In the original Faust story that’s a return to youth and the love of an innocent woman.

Of course the deal has a time limit, historically seven years, and a fiendish… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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