Real Food/Fake Food: Why You Don’t Know What You’re Eating & What You Can Do About It

copyright the Chronicle August 3, 2016

 

Reviewed by Joseph Gresser

Larry Olmsted’s useful and frightening book manages to repeatedly stimulate and quell the reader’s appetite. He highlights some of the finest foods and drinks the world has to offer and explains why the average eater and drinker will probably not be provided what he or she is expecting.

In some cases the difference is obvious. Few people believe that Kraft Foods puts genuine imported Parmesan cheese in its green cardboard cans. It may come as a bit of a shock to find out that the can’s contents include very little that can be categorized as cheese, but the harm done is slight.

That may not be the case when someone buys what she thinks is extra virgin olive oil or seafood. Mr. Olmsted’s research reveals that the supermarket bottle that claims to contain fine Italian olive oil may hold a blend of oils that includes peanut oil, a deception that could put an allergic person’s life in jeopardy.

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An energetic and updated performance of Annie Get Your Gun

copyright the Chronicle August 3, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

Annie Get Your Gun is an early product of the golden age of American musical theater. It was first staged in 1946, just a few years after Rogers and Hammerstein’s Oklahoma, which kicked off an era of musicals that lasted into the 1970s.

Seventy years later Annie Get Your Gun is playing on the Greensboro town green, in an energetic production by the Greensboro Arts Alliance and Residency and Mirror Theatre Ltd.

The show was directed by Sean Haberle based on a revised version of the script put together for a 1999 Broadway revival.

Anyone who has ever seen the movie version of the show, made in 1950, will recognize the potential pitfalls the original version might encounter in an era more attuned to ethnic and gender equity. …To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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More named Renaissance Corp. director

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copyright the Chronicle August 3, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — It was July 28, Cynthia More’s first day on the job as executive director of the Newport City Renaissance Corporation (NCRC), and she didn’t have the key to her office.

Fortunately, Rick Woodward, the owner of the old Montgomery Ward building on Main Street and NCRC’s landlord, saw Ms. More’s predicament as she stood at the door and let her use his key.

Ms. More went in, followed by her husband, Gene McCormick, and a visitor, and she tried the desk chair out for size and looked around at the room’s bare walls.

By Tuesday the office was transformed. Ms. More had found banners trumpeting Newport’s marketing slogans and hung them on the walls. Swag, including Newport tote bags, medallions, and other NCRC branded items were out of storage and on display. Ms. More looked as if she had been on the job for years.

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Galbraith says he would put an end to big wind

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copyright the Chronicle August 3, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

BARTON — Former state Senator Peter Galbraith, who hails from Townsend, visited the Northeast Kingdom on July 27. He was on a campaign swing to promote his bid for the Democratic nomination for Governor in the Primary on August 9.

Mr. Galbraith showed up at the Chronicle with a piece of strategic advice for those who dislike large-scale wind development.

“If you are opposed to industrial wind, you should vote for me in the Democratic Primary,” he said.

He explained his reasoning by noting that both Republican candidates favor a ban on industrial wind development.

Should he gain the nomination, he said, voters would be assured that wind development would stop regardless of which party wins in November.

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Vermont lawyer helps free Gitmo detainee

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copyright the Chronicle July 27, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

Abu Zahir was cleared to return to his country on July 11, exactly 14 years after he was arrested by U.S. forces at his home in Afghanistan. For most of that time Mr. Zahir was held prisoner at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, while a pair of Vermont lawyers worked on his behalf.

One of the two, David Sleigh of St. Johnsbury, said Monday that Mr. Zahir was “recommended for transfer without reservation.” Mr. Sleigh said that means he will not be under supervision on his return to Afghanistan.

In its “unclassified summary of final determination,” his periodic review board noted Mr. Zahir’s “limited role in Taliban structure and activities, and the assessment that [he] was probably misidentified as the individual who had ties to al-Qaeda weapons facilitation” as some of its reasons for allowing his release.

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Farmers suffer from steep drop in milk prices

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copyright the Chronicle July 27, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

A steep drop in milk prices over the past year or so is hurting farmers, and the insurance program intended to help them has not done its job. That’s the bad news from Leon Berthiaume, general manager of the St. Albans Cooperative Creamery.

He was quick to add happier tidings, such as the switch by consumers from skim and reduced fat back to whole milk, and continued high demand for butter. But his overall message was one of low prices and difficult margins into next year.

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Woman gets jail for starving goats

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copyright the Chronicle June 29, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — The Holland woman whose barn was filled with starving and dead goats admitted guilt Tuesday and will spend 15 days of an 18-to-36-month sentence in jail.

Stacey Lynn Lopes, 42, now of Rehoboth, Massachusetts, pled guilty to three charges of cruelty to animals by depriving them of food and water, and a felony charge of cruelty to animals by causing them undue pain.

In the Criminal Division of Orleans County Superior Court, Judge Howard VanBenthuysen ordered Ms. Lopes to serve the jail portion of her otherwise suspended sentence in three-day chunks on consecutive weekends.

Under the terms of a plea agreement worked out with the Orleans County State’s Attorney, Ms. Lopes is no longer allowed to own or care for animals. She will remain on probation for three years.

Dr. Kristin Haas, veterinarian with the state Agency of Agriculture, told police on May 8, 2015, she found several malnourished and dead goats at a farm in Holland…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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More charges stem from Barton meth lab raid

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Copyright the Chronicle June 22, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — The other shoe dropped Tuesday for Terry A. Parson, 33, of Bellows Falls. He was brought into the Criminal Division of Orleans County Criminal Court Tuesday where five more charges were added to the three he already faces for allegedly making and selling methamphetamine.

Mr. Parson pled innocent to two felony charges of conspiring to make meth and one of manufacturing the drug. He also denied charges of cruelty to a child and reckless endangerment.

If he is convicted of the most serious charge, manufacturing methamphetamine, Mr. Parson could spend up to 20 years in prison and pay a fine of $1-million.

One May 23 Mr. Parson pled innocent to selling meth, a felony, and possession of less than 2.5 grams of the drug.

Judge Howard VanBenthuysen kept Mr. Parson’s bail at $100,000. He has not been able to raise that amount and remains at Northern State Correctional Facility in Newport…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Demonstration held in wake of Orlando shootings

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Copyright the Chronicle June 22, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — Some Newport residents decided not to let a Florida shooting that left 49 people dead and another 53 wounded pass without a public statement about their distress and anger.

Pam Ladds was seated at the Emory Hebard State Office Building at 3 p.m. on Friday. She wore a T-shirt decorated with a big pink triangle and carried a hand drum.

Ms. Ladds was the only person on time for a demonstration called in the wake of the June 12 murder of 49 people at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, but said she was confident that others would soon join her.

Sure enough, people began arriving, one or two at a time, until a small crowd, about 12 or 13 strong, stood near the big stone fish on the plaza in front of the state office building.

Most carried hand lettered signs opposing the sale of military style weapons for civilian use.

“The demonstration was scheduled as a way of raising awareness of what happened in Orlando,” Ms. Ladds said…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Jay Peak tram won’t be repaired until next spring

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copyright the Chronicle June 8, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

The state has ordered that the tram at Jay Peak be shut down until critical repairs are made. And the only company that can do the work has said Jay must wait until April of next year for the upgrade work.

The area’s main lift needs immediate attention, and that means lots of money, Michael Goldberg, the receiver for Jay Peak Resort, Burke Mountain Resort, and the other businesses owned and run by Ariel Quiros, told U.S. District Judge Darrin Gayles in a ten-page motion on June 1.

Judge Gayles, who appointed Mr. Goldberg, is presiding over a civil suit filed against Mr. Quiros, Bill Stenger, former president of Jay Peak, and their associated network of companies. The suit was filed by the federal Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) in U.S. Court…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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