Hunting with drones likely to be banned

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Noah Menard of Barton poses proudly with the spikehorn he shot in 2013 in Barton.  He and his father, Nathan, stopped by the Chronicle for a photo before having the deer weighed, but his first buck, taken at a distance of 55 yards, was big enough to put a smile on the eight-year-old’s face.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Noah Menard of Barton poses proudly with the spikehorn he shot in 2013 in Barton. He and his father, Nathan, stopped by the Chronicle for a photo before having the deer weighed, but his first buck, taken at a distance of 55 yards, was big enough to put a smile on the eight-year-old’s face. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle September 24, 2014 

by Tena Starr

The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Board will hold a public hearing next month on a new regulation that would prevent people from hunting with drones, or any other aircraft.

The rule is being considered more as a precaution against future problems than a remedy for any existing one.

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Employees to buy the Chronicle

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Drawing by Anna P. Baker

Drawing by Anna P. Baker

copyright the Chronicle September 17, 2014

Eleven long-time employees of the Chronicle have agreed in principle to buy the weekly newspaper from its founding publishers, Chris and Ellen Braithwaite.

 

While some details remain to be worked out, the basic elements of the deal have been agreed to, and the purchase should be complete by early 2015.

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Girl treks to Vermont in post apocalyptic novel

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WEB polly reviewcopyright the Chronicle September 10, 2014

Polly And The One And Only World, by Don Bredes. 335 pages. Paperback. Published by Green Writers Press. $14.95.

Reviewed by Tena Starr

Polly and the One and Only World is a page-turner.

I picked up the book on a Monday night, was a little late for work Tuesday morning because I desperately wanted to know what happened next, and finished it at two Wednesday morning.

You know that kind of book — the kind where you look at the clock and tell yourself you really should turn the lights off and go to sleep. Instead, you say, well, maybe just one more chapter, and keep saying it, until you’re at the end and know you’ll regret it in the morning.

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Taxpayers angered by big tax jumps

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albany schoolhouse smaller

copyright the Chronicle September 10, 2014

by Tena Starr

WESTFIELD — Since property tax bills here went out recently, town officials have heard a lot of griping — and confusion. Why did the residential property tax rate go up 24 percent when the Jay-Westfield School budget went up by about 5 percent?

“We’ve had a lot of people not happy, and I’m in that category,” said Westfield Town Clerk LaDonna Dunn. “This year in Westfield we got hit pretty hard.”

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In Glover: Association wants to close part of Shadow Lake

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The Shadow Lake Association has petitioned the state, asking that a roughly one-acre section of Danforth Cove at the north end of Shadow Lake be temporarily closed to human use in order to control milfoil.  The area is already marked by orange buoys and is not supposed to be used for fishing, boating, or swimming.  Photo by Tena Starr

The Shadow Lake Association has petitioned the state, asking that a roughly one-acre section of Danforth Cove at the north end of Shadow Lake be temporarily closed to human use in order to control milfoil. The area is already marked by orange buoys and is not supposed to be used for fishing, boating, or swimming. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle September 3, 2014

by Tena Starr

GLOVER — Members of the Shadow Lake Association have petitioned the state, asking that a roughly one-acre section of the lake be closed to human use in order to control milfoil. It would be only the second time in Vermont that part of a lake has been closed to public use because of milfoil.

The last time the rule was exercised was in 1998 when part of Lake Morey was closed due to a milfoil infestation, said Matthew Probasco, aquatic nuisance control and pesticide general permit coordinator at the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).

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What makes Vermont special?

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web vermont special2copyright the Chronicle August 20, 2014 

What Makes Vermont Special, by Greg Carpenter. Published by Shires Press. 134 pages. Paperback. $24.99.

Reviewed by Tena Starr

Greg Carpenter, a teacher in Swanton who summers on Echo Lake in Charleston, says the idea for his recent book, What Makes Vermont Special, came from a student. He worked on it for three years, traveling around Vermont taking the photographs himself, and doing the research.

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Ruminations: On seasonal cooking in northern Vermont

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web ruminations cookbookcopyright the Chronicle August 6, 2014

by Tena Starr

Marcie Kaufman is a professionally trained chef who lives in Jay. She graduated from the New England Culinary Institute in Montpelier in 1992, but began her career earlier, in 1987, as an apprentice boulanger and patissier.

To translate broadly, that means she is a very good baker and pastry maker.

Ms. Kaufman has now written a cookbook called Seasonal Appetite, a Chef’s Celebration of Vermont’s Seasons. She says the solitude of her own kitchen has replaced the restaurant’s “animated discourse.”

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Brighton couple finds their family cemetery plot occupied

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Charles Roth stands in front of the grave that was dug in his family’s plot over the winter.  When he and his wife, Linda, visited the grave this spring they discovered that someone had apparently been buried   there without their knowledge.  For a story, please see page twenty-two.   Photo by Tena Starr

Charles Roth stands in front of the grave that was dug in his family’s plot over the winter. When he and his wife, Linda, visited the grave this spring they discovered that someone had apparently been buried there without their knowledge. For a story, please see page twenty-two. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle July 30, 2014 

by Tena Starr

BRIGHTON — Charles and Linda Roth visited their family cemetery plot here in late April and were astonished to find that someone had been buried in it over the winter.

“We visited the cemetery to pay our respects, and we saw there was an apparent burial there,” Mr. Roth said. “I don’t know who’s in there, or if anyone is in there.”

But it sure looks like someone is, he said.

“I really was shocked when I came down to remove the wreath,” Mrs. Roth said. “I thought what is that?”

First, Mr. Roth went to the State Police. “They chose to do little or nothing,” he said.

Then he went to the Brighton Selectmen.

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Putting Mosher in the pantheon

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howard mosher webcopyright the Chronicle July 2, 2014

Howard Frank Mosher and the Classics, Echoes in the Vermont Writer’s Works, by James Robert Saunders. 208 pages. Softcover. Published by McFarland. $45.

Reviewed by Tena Starr

Four years ago, in June of 2010, Purdue University professor James Robert Saunders went to hear Howard Mosher of Irasburg give a talk on his latest book, Walking to Gatlinburg.

“I had already read that particular work as well as the other ten books that he had written up to that point, books that I would see, off and on, when I visited the independent booksellers that are a mainstay of Vermont’s literary enterprise,” Mr. Saunders writes in his introduction to his own book, Howard Frank Mosher and the Classics, Echoes in the Vermont Writer’s Works. “Wanting to learn more about this author, who always seemed to have a little section at those stores reserved for him, I got on my computer and checked with the online MLA Bibliography, but found precious little that had been written about his works, in terms of interpretation.”

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Guardians ad litem can make a big difference

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Kathy White of Barton has been a guardian ad litem for nearly eight years and says it’s a rewarding experience.  Photo by Tena Starr

Kathy White of Barton has been a guardian ad litem for nearly eight years and says it’s a rewarding experience. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle July 2, 2014

by Tena Starr

BARTON — Nearly eight years ago, Kathy White of Barton decided she’d like to “pay it forward,” as she put it. “I wanted to find something I could do that had meaning,” she said in a recent interview.

That desire led her to become a guardian ad litem, or a GAL, a person who volunteers his or her time to represent the interests of “children in need of care or supervision” (CHINS).

That could involve anything from a nasty divorce to a situation where a family can’t properly care for a child anymore. The Guardian Ad Litem Program’s mission statements says its goal is to make sure that children and their families receive “appropriate services in a timely manner; that case plans and court decisions are based on the child’s best interests; and every child has a safe, stable and permanent home within a reasonable period of time.”

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