East Albany Catholic church is likely to be sold

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The nearly 150-year-old Catholic church here could go up for sale soon.  Photo by Tena Starr

The nearly 150-year-old Catholic church here could go up for sale soon. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle August 26, 2015

EAST ALBANY — The nearly 150-year-old Catholic church here could go up for sale soon.

Mass hasn’t been said at the church for some time now, but it has been used for weddings, baptisms, funerals, and until a few years ago there were services on Catholic holidays, said longtime parishioner Paul Daniels.

Mr. Daniels provided a tour of the old church on Sunday, a church his Irish ancestors helped build starting in 1869, he said. He’s feeling nostalgic about its demise, which has come about both through lack of attendance and the need for repairs, said parish priest Tim Naples.

The problem is a financial one, not particular to St. John of the Cross Church, but to the entire Most Holy Trinity Parish, which includes…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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What to do with all those plums?

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WEB Ruminations plums cmykcopyright the Chronicle August 19, 2015

by Tena Starr  

This is the time of year when we have what we call “summer food” dinners. Mainly those dinners are about the vegetables. It’s a time of year when it’s a pleasure to cook.

People often talk about having to sneak vegetables into their children’s food. With two children and three grandchildren who have rarely refused a vegetable, who snack on vegetables, it seems to me that kids do not have an inherent dislike of them — they somehow learn it.

Maybe they were fed too many canned green beans, maybe they think of vegetables as overcooked mush instead of crisp and crunchy. Maybe they developed a taste, along the way, for…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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A blessedly sweltering road trip in Tennessee

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In 1811 and 1812, a series of violent earthquakes caused the Mississippi River to flow backwards for a time, creating Reelfoot Lake, which is shallow but encompasses 15,000 acres.  The area is now a state park.  Cyprus trees are the prettiest things there.  The water itself is home to such unwelcoming creatures as snapping turtles, alligator gar, and water moccasins.  We stayed at the Blue Bank Resort, which is right on the water.  Boardwalks and bridges provide a way for people to get around.  Photo by Tena Starr

In 1811 and 1812, a series of violent earthquakes caused the Mississippi River to flow backwards for a time, creating Reelfoot Lake, which is shallow but encompasses 15,000 acres. The area is now a state park. Cyprus trees are the prettiest things there. The water itself is home to such unwelcoming creatures as snapping turtles, alligator gar, and water moccasins. We stayed at the Blue Bank Resort, which is right on the water. Boardwalks and bridges provide a way for people to get around. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle August 5, 2015

by Tena Starr

For quite some time I’ve had an itch, and this year’s cool, rainy summer has done nothing to scratch it. After a bitter winter, I craved warm — no, hot weather, and I wanted a road trip.

Some people like to have a destination, entertainment and amenities when they travel — Disney World, a resort, beaches, one stop shopping, so to speak. I like road trips. That means setting a general destination and time frame, and that’s about it. What happens between departure and arrival is unscheduled. The point is to see the country and its people. The destination itself can be vague.

In this case, it was the Mississippi River.

Steve was taken aback when I said… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Melissa Mount and Steffie head to the Nationals

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In mid-July, Steffie took reserve champion in Open Training Level Dressage at the Arabian Horse Association Regional Horse Show in Springfield, Massachusetts.  She also placed in the top five in the amateur division.   Photo courtesy of Melissa Mount

In mid-July, Steffie took reserve champion in Open Training Level Dressage at the Arabian Horse Association Regional Horse Show in Springfield, Massachusetts. She also placed in the top five in the amateur division. Photo courtesy of Melissa Mount

copyright the Chronicle July 29, 2015

by Tena Starr  

NEWPORT — Melissa Mount of Westfield got her first pony when she was three years old. It was a Shetland, a small pony, which is the reason parents tend to buy them for children — despite the fact that they have anything but a cooperative nature.

The romance with horses ends for many kids as they become adolescent, but not for Melissa Mount. Somewhere in her youth, she got hooked on dressage, and now she and her eight-year-old Arabian mare are headed for the national championships in North Carolina, to be held in September.

The pair has qualified, which puts them among a small number of Vermonters who have done well enough at that demanding sport to get to the nationals.

On July 11, Ms. Mount and Steffie (registered name Profit’s Sweet Steps) took reserve champion in…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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A mobile home hits the road

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This house trailer was abandoned in Irasburg at the intersection of the West Glover Road and Burton Hill sometime early Monday morning.  On its journey from Glover it lost its tires, but ventured on, tearing up the gravel road.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

This house trailer was abandoned in Irasburg at the intersection of the West Glover Road and Burton Hill sometime early Monday morning. On its journey from Glover it lost its tires, but ventured on, tearing up the gravel road. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 3, 2015

by Tena Starr 

IRASBURG — Town officials here were flummoxed Monday morning by the appearance of a house trailer at the intersection of the West Glover Road and Burton Hill. Not beside the road — in the road.

Someone had hauled the big yellow trailer there overnight and left it leaning against a telephone pole. That someone had also left quite a mess behind him. The trailer had been dragged for several miles without tires and had badly damaged the gravel road.

The house trailer started its journey in Glover Sunday night, and with tires. It came north on Route 16….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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contact Tena Starr at tenas@bartonchronicle.com

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Newport Jewelers has first burglary in 34 years

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Newport Jewelers in Newport was burglarized early Monday morning, the first time that’s happened in the 34 years that Lincoln and Jo-Ann Brooks have owned the store.    Photo by Joseph Gresser

Newport Jewelers in Newport was burglarized early Monday morning, the first time that’s happened in the 34 years that Lincoln and Jo-Ann Brooks have owned the store. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 3, 2015

by Tena Starr

NEWPORT — For the first time in the 34 years that Newport Jewelers has been in business, it’s been burglarized, said Lincoln Brooks, who owns the store with his wife, Jo-Ann.

At 4 a.m. on Monday, someone broke into the store, broke two jewelry cases, and “snatched and ran,” Mr. Brooks said.

He said that, as of Tuesday, they had not yet done an inventory so were not sure exactly what was missing, though he believes it could have been considerably worse.

A press release from the Newport Police Department says police responded to the alarm at 4:08 a.m. When they arrived, they found a broken window, and two display cases were broken “and items strewn about.”

The Main Street burglary was certainly brazen, Mr. Brooks said….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Ray charged with first-degree murder

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Orleans County Deputy Sheriff Phil Brooks with Jeffrey M. Ray of Brownington, who pled innocent in Superior Court Monday to first degree murder.  Mr. Ray, who is being held without bail, is accused of shooting another Brownington man, Rick Vreeland, Monday morning.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Orleans County Deputy Sheriff Phil Brooks with Jeffrey M. Ray of Brownington, who pled innocent in Superior Court Monday to first degree murder. Mr. Ray, who is being held without bail, is accused of shooting another Brownington man, Rick Vreeland, Monday morning. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle May 27, 2015

by Tena Starr  

NEWPORT — Jeffrey M. Ray, 51, of Brownington pled innocent here Tuesday to first degree murder and was held without bail.

Mr. Ray is accused of shooting and killing Rick Vreeland, 53, his former wife’s husband, on Monday.

Mr. Ray appeared in the Criminal Division of Orleans Superior Court looking the worse for wear. He was hospitalized on Monday as a result of a struggle with his son, who said he tried to take the gun away from Mr. Ray, his father, after Mr. Ray shot Mr. Vreeland, the boy’s stepfather, a police affidavit says.

The shooting apparently wasn’t a big surprise to those who knew the two men. Police affidavits indicate they had been at odds for years. Mr. Ray had repeatedly….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Peters still holds CDL at 95

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Bill Peters' children recently gave him a plaque, honoring him for possibly being the oldest man in Vermont who still holds a CDL.  He's 95, and was a longtime road commissioner in Albany.   Photo by Tena Starr

Bill Peters’ children recently gave him a plaque, honoring him for possibly being the oldest man in Vermont who still holds a CDL. He’s 95, and was a longtime road commissioner in Albany. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle May 27, 2015

by Tena Starr  

NORTH HYDE PARK — Former Albany Road Commissioner Bill Peters could well be the oldest man in Vermont who still holds a CDL. That’s a commercial driver’s license, which, among other things, allows a person to drive the big trucks that maintain town roads.

Mr. Peters’ children recently presented their father with a plaque that says: “Congratulations on being the oldest person we could find that still has a CDL and medical card in the state of Vermont. Turned 95 on March 31, 2015. We are proud of you.”

The plaque was the idea of Mr. Peters’ son Donald.

He said he was out shoveling snow in March and thought, what do you get a man who’s 95?….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Book review: Writer exhumes surprising stories from Brighton

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WEB IP bookcopyright the Chronicle May 27, 2015

Island Pond Reflections, by S.J. Campbell. Paperback. 130 pages. Self-published. $19.99.

Reviewed by Tena Starr  

Island Pond Reflections isn’t a scholarly history of Brighton, which has also been known rather charmingly as Gilead, Random, and the less romantic Lot 31.

Instead, Sharon Campbell says in the book’s introduction that she’s written a collection of “true stories and tales long forgotten.”

The stories come from books and newspaper articles and date back centuries.

“They provide a tantalizing glimpse into the lives of the people who lived here and describe the developments that shaped their environment,” Ms. Campbell writes. “Through the centuries Island Pond grew big enough to accommodate a whole host of characters. Their trials and tribulations were deemed worthy of being reported by newspapers in cities as far away as Boston, Seattle, London, and Montreal.”

Ms. Campbell says that Brighton, and Island Pond, the village within the town, was, at one time, quite a diverse place, populated by Italian stonemasons, Syrian storekeepers, and Lebanese Christians escaping religious or political persecution….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Barton Motors to be sold at auction

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The former Barton Motor Company property.  Photo by Tena Starr

The former Barton Motor Company property. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle May 13, 2015

by Tena Starr

BARTON — The Barton Motor Company, for many years a thriving Ford dealership, will go up for foreclosure auction on June 15.

Court papers say that Winston Harper, who once owned the company with his brother Woody Harper, is owed $434,802 in principle and interest. They also say that there are six federal tax liens on the property, amounting to a little over $103,000.

Woody Harper died in February, 15 years after he and his brother parted ways as co-owners of the company.

Winston Harper said their father bought the dealership and garage in 1958….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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