Efficiency, economy, and school funding discussed at Barton Chamber meeting

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Bob Murphy, public events coordinator from Efficiency Vermont, addresses the Barton Area Chamber of Commerce annual meeting at the WilloughVale Inn in Westmore on Thursday night.  Mr. Murphy and project intake coordinator Adam Tower talked about how businesses can take advantage of Efficiency Vermont’s help, from technical advice to incentives or rebates, to improving their energy efficiency and save money.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Bob Murphy, public events coordinator from Efficiency Vermont, addresses the Barton Area Chamber of Commerce annual meeting at the WilloughVale Inn in Westmore on Thursday night. Mr. Murphy and project intake coordinator Adam Tower talked about how businesses can take advantage of Efficiency Vermont’s help, from technical advice to incentives or rebates, to improving their energy efficiency and save money. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle October 28, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

WESTMORE — Bob Murphy of Efficiency Vermont opened his presentation to the Barton Area Chamber of Commerce’s annual gathering by asking how many people in the room used electricity or other fuels in the course of operating their businesses.

Every hand in the room went up.

“How many of you have been in touch with us to find out how you can use less energy and save money?” Mr. Murphy asked.

Three or four hands went up.

“That’s not a matching number of hands,” he said.

Mr. Murphy and his co-worker Adam Tower were the featured speakers at the chamber’s annual dinner, which was held on Thursday, October 22, at the WilloughVale Inn. More than 40 members and guests came to enjoy a buffet style dinner, cash bar, speakers, and… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Governor’s race: County lawmakers lean toward Milne

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Scott Milne.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Scott Milne. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle November 12, 2014

by Tena Starr

If Orleans County’s legislative delegation had its way, Scott Milne would be Vermont’s next governor.

That’s not a surprising decision for the Republicans who represent the county, but as of this week only one of the three Democrats was willing to unequivocally say that he’ll follow tradition and support the candidate who won the popular vote.

Representative Sam Young of Glover said he will vote for Governor Shumlin.

“I think it’s generally a bad precedent if the Legislature starts electing people who didn’t win,” Mr. Young said.

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Election wrap: Barrett, Viens, Hardy win elections

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Important correction to the November 5, 2014, election results:

House - Orleans-Caledonia.xlsx

These are the full results to the Orleans-Caledonia House race, as it should have appeared in the Chronicle. A cropped version of the chart, with only Chris Braithwaite and Devin Small, was printed in the paper, in error.

Complete election results for each race available in the Chronicle.

copyright the Chronicle November 5, 2014

by Joseph Gresser

Jennifer Barrett was the big winner of Tuesday’s election, scoring a convincing victory to secure the office of Orleans County State’s Attorney. The Republican candidate garnered more votes than the combined totals of her two rivals.

When all votes were counted Ms. Barrett had 3,882, to 2,337 for Democrat James Lillicrap, and 1,486 for independent Ben Luna. The three candidates were all but unavoidable over the course of a long campaign that began this summer as Ms. Barrett faced incumbent State’s Attorney Alan Franklin in the Republican primary and defeated him.

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GMO bill splits local legislators by party

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Wheat at Butterworks Farm in Westfield is grown organically, with no genetic modifications.  Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

Wheat at Butterworks Farm in Westfield is grown organically, with no genetic modifications. Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

copyright the Chronicle May 21, 2014

by Bethany M. Dunbar

Orleans County farmers and consumers won’t be immediately affected by Vermont’s first-in-the-nation passage of legislation requiring labeling of foods with genetically modified ingredients.

The legislation allows two years for the rulemaking process, and potential challenges are brewing in the courts and in Congress in the meantime.

“I’m really proud of Vermont as a state,” said Jack Lazor of Butterworks Farm in Westfield, a leader in the organic farming movement. He said he has always thought those who like genetically modified organisms (GMOs) ought to be happy to include them on their labels.

“Well, if it’s that safe, label it and be proud of it,” he said.

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The Legislature this week: House raises minimum wage to $10.10

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David Mealiea and Anna Dirkse, both of Burlington, were two of four singing pickets who stood outside the State House in March, in support of raising the minimum wage.  “We fight for human rights so all can be free,” they sang.  Photo by Paul Lefebvre

David Mealiea and Anna Dirkse, both of Burlington, were two of four singing pickets who stood outside the State House in March, in support of raising the minimum wage. “We fight for human rights so all can be free,” they sang. Photo by Paul Lefebvre

copyright the Chronicle April 9, 2014

by Paul Lefebvre

MONTPELIER — Vermont is going to increase its hourly minimum wage.

Vermont legislators generally agreed that it was the right and ethical thing to do.

But when, and by how much, is still hanging in the air.

Under a House bill that won preliminary approval Tuesday, next year on January 1, 2015, a minimum wage worker could see his or her weekly pay check jump by roughly $40.

That’s the result of an increase in the minimum wage going from $8.73 to $10.10 an hour.

“Forty dollars in your pocket is not a theory,” said Representative Tom Stevens of Waterbury, speaking in the urgent tone of legislators who wanted to make a change.

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