Irasburg Selectmen: Board gets tutorial on public meeting law

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Irasburg town attorney Sara Davies Coe explains the fine points of the open meeting law to the Irasburg Select Board and planning commission.  At left is board Chair Brian Fecher.  At the far right is Town Clerk Danielle Ingalls.   Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Irasburg town attorney Sara Davies Coe explains the fine points of the open meeting law to the Irasburg Select Board and planning commission. At left is board Chair Brian Fecher. At the far right is Town Clerk Danielle Ingalls. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle January 6, 2016

by Elizabeth Trail

IRASBURG — “Oftentimes boards think they are eligible to enter executive session when they are not,” Irasburg town attorney Sara Davies Coe told the selectmen and members of the newly formed Irasburg Planning Commission at Monday night’s meeting.

Ms. Davies Coe’s comment raised a few chuckles around the room, if rueful ones, from the select board. Irasburg’s select board has been accused of violating the open meeting law twice in the past several months.

So Ms. Davies Coe was asked to come to the meeting to conduct a training session.

“I’m a new chair, and I want to be sure I get it right,” Brian Fecher said. “We also have a new board member.”

“Basically if Brian meets Brian… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Sugar and spice at the Leach Public Library

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Olivia Peters played in the gingerbread playhouse in the Leach Public Library once she finished decorating her cookies.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Olivia Peters played in the gingerbread playhouse in the Leach Public Library once she finished decorating her cookies. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle December 2, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

IRASBURG — The Leach Public Library in Irasburg held the ninth edition of its Gingerbread Open House on Saturday.

The promise of gingerbread featured on a sign outdoors lured people into the library, where the smells of Christmas — evergreens, sugar, and spice — greeted them.

From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. people could taste all kinds of cookies and cider, participate in a raffle, decorate cookies, and listen to beautiful music.

The purpose of the event was to raise money for the library, but it’s not a moneymaker, so the hope is that it will generate more traffic to the library, librarian and organizer Laurie Green said.

“We’ve never had it this early,” she said when asked about the turnout.

Normally the open house occurs… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Irasburg votes 274-9 against wind projects

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Irasburg Select Board Chair Robin Kay addresses the meeting, flanked by selectmen Brian Sanville (left) and  Brian Fecher (right.)  The select board moved its table onto the stage in order to make room for additional rows of chairs to accommodate the crowd.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Irasburg Select Board Chair Robin Kay addresses the meeting, flanked by selectmen Brian Sanville (left) and Brian Fecher (right.) The select board moved its table onto the stage in order to make room for additional rows of chairs to accommodate the crowd. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle October 7, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

IRASBURG — People filled the town hall and spilled out into the street on Thursday, October 1, to vote “no” on wind development in Irasburg. Hundreds stood in line to get into the overfilled town hall for a special select board meeting on the future of wind development on Irasburg ridgelines.

Although the vote was nonbinding, the final tally was an overwhelming 274 against and 9 in favor.

The question on the ballot was “Shall Kidder Hill, or any other ridgelines of the town of Irasburg, Vermont, be used for development by industrial wind turbine projects?”

The meeting was the latest in a series of responses to a proposal by energy developer David Blittersdorf to put two 500-foot wind turbines on land he owns on Kidder Hill.

On August 11, at least 40 people, including two state legislators, came to the Irasburg Select Board meeting to talk about wind. After… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Irasburg wind opponents plan petition drive

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Irasburg Ridgeline Alliance (IRA) volunteer Becky Boulanger of Irasburg hands a Vermont state flag to Gary Bennett, also of Irasburg.  The flag is the final decoration for a hay wagon located near the south end of Irasburg Common.  It’s one of six  positioned throughout Irasburg in preparation for IRA’s “neighbor-to-neighbor” campaign kickoff meeting to be held at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 9, at the Irasburg Town Hall.  Photo by Cathy Bennett

Irasburg Ridgeline Alliance (IRA) volunteer Becky Boulanger of Irasburg hands a Vermont state flag to Gary Bennett, also of Irasburg. The flag is the final decoration for a hay wagon located near the south end of Irasburg Common. It’s one of six positioned throughout Irasburg in preparation for IRA’s “neighbor-to-neighbor” campaign kickoff meeting to be held at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 9, at the Irasburg Town Hall. Photo by Cathy Bennett

copyright the Chronicle September 9, 2015

by Tena Starr  

IRASBURG — A loose coalition called the Irasburg Ridge Alliance (IRA) has formed here to oppose David Blittersdorf’s plans for a two-tower commercial wind project on Kidder Hill.

The group will hold a meeting on Wednesday evening, September 9.

“The advice we got from our legislators is that the best chance we have to preserve Kidder Hill from industrial wind development is to present a unified and strong opposition from the town,” said Judith Jackson, an organizer.

With that in mind, she said, the group will start a petition drive to see how many Irasburg voters are opposed to Mr. Blittersdorf’s project.

“What we hope to ascertain is whether there is widespread opposition to it, and to launch a campaign to get as many signatures of Irasburg voters as possible for a petition to the select board to oppose the Kidder Hill project and to develop…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Kidder Hill wind project draw fierce opposition

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Pictured here, David Blittersdorf, the professional wind developer who plans to put up the turbines and owns the land they would be sited on, came to the meeting but was not allowed to speak. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Pictured here, David Blittersdorf, the professional wind developer who plans to put up the turbines and owns the land they would be sited on, came to the meeting but was not allowed to speak. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle August 12, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

IRASBURG — About 40 people, including two state legislators, came to the Irasburg Select Board meeting on Monday night to protest two commercial scale wind towers proposed for nearby Kidder Hill.

David Blittersdorf, the professional wind developer who plans to put up the turbines and owns the land they would be sited on, also came to the meeting but was not allowed to speak.  After listening to well over an hour of public comments, the select board agreed to have some answers at its next meeting to questions about exactly what the town can and cannot do regarding wind development.

Kidder Hill is about four miles northwest of Irasburg. The two towers would produce…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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A mobile home hits the road

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This house trailer was abandoned in Irasburg at the intersection of the West Glover Road and Burton Hill sometime early Monday morning.  On its journey from Glover it lost its tires, but ventured on, tearing up the gravel road.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

This house trailer was abandoned in Irasburg at the intersection of the West Glover Road and Burton Hill sometime early Monday morning. On its journey from Glover it lost its tires, but ventured on, tearing up the gravel road. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 3, 2015

by Tena Starr 

IRASBURG — Town officials here were flummoxed Monday morning by the appearance of a house trailer at the intersection of the West Glover Road and Burton Hill. Not beside the road — in the road.

Someone had hauled the big yellow trailer there overnight and left it leaning against a telephone pole. That someone had also left quite a mess behind him. The trailer had been dragged for several miles without tires and had badly damaged the gravel road.

The house trailer started its journey in Glover Sunday night, and with tires. It came north on Route 16….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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contact Tena Starr at [email protected]

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Dions accused of elaborate poaching scheme

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Wayne and Jennie Dion of Irasburg pose with the two bucks they shot on opening weekend of rifle season in 2008.  Mr. Dion’s deer was an eight-pointer and weighed 190 pounds.  Ms. Dion’s deer was a six-pointer and weighed 160 pounds.  Photos courtesy of the Dions

Wayne and Jennie Dion of Irasburg pose with the two bucks they shot on opening weekend of rifle season in 2008. Mr. Dion’s deer was an eight-pointer and weighed 190 pounds. Ms. Dion’s deer was a six-pointer and weighed 160 pounds. Photos courtesy of the Dions

copyright the Chronicle November 26, 2014

by Tena Starr

An Irasburg couple will be brought to court next month for allegedly running an elaborate deer poaching operation that included baiting and spotlights in their well concealed backyard and a gun portal in a wall of their house.

Wayne Dion, 66, and Jennie Dion, 63, are facing multiple charges related to deer baiting and illegal hunting, Major Dennis Reinhardt, who is in charge of law enforcement for the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department, said Monday.

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In boys AAU basketball: Orleans County Challengers go to the nationals

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Pictured are the Orleans County Challengers.  In the back row, from left to right, are: Shelly Lanou, Priscilla Stebenne, Isaiah Braithwaite, Ajay Warner, Drew Drageset, Dalton Gentley, Evan Inkel, and Albert Stebenne.  In the front are:  Matthew Menard, Braydon Leach, Landyn Leach, Dillon Stebbins, and Connor Lanou.  Photo courtesy of Martha Braithwaite

Pictured are the Orleans County Challengers. In the back row, from left to right, are: Shelly Lanou, Priscilla Stebenne, Isaiah Braithwaite, Ajay Warner, Drew Drageset, Dalton Gentley, Evan Inkel, and Albert Stebenne. In the front are: Matthew Menard, Braydon Leach, Landyn Leach, Dillon Stebbins, and Connor Lanou. Photo courtesy of Martha Braithwaite

copyright the Chronicle July 23, 2014

by Isaiah Braithwaite

MEMPHIS, Tennessee — We are the Orleans County Challengers. Players from Glover, Irasburg, Albany, Orleans and Derby compete for us. We got together for our first practice in March after our junior high basketball season ended. Despite being competitors just days before, we all immediately got along. Not only playing basketball but off the court, too, we were all friends before teammates.

It was obvious in our first game, that in Vermont, we would be a force to be reckoned with, scoring 79 points in our first game together. After four tournaments, with four games in each one, we were champions — we hadn’t lost a single game.

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Putting Mosher in the pantheon

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howard mosher webcopyright the Chronicle July 2, 2014

Howard Frank Mosher and the Classics, Echoes in the Vermont Writer’s Works, by James Robert Saunders. 208 pages. Softcover. Published by McFarland. $45.

Reviewed by Tena Starr

Four years ago, in June of 2010, Purdue University professor James Robert Saunders went to hear Howard Mosher of Irasburg give a talk on his latest book, Walking to Gatlinburg.

“I had already read that particular work as well as the other ten books that he had written up to that point, books that I would see, off and on, when I visited the independent booksellers that are a mainstay of Vermont’s literary enterprise,” Mr. Saunders writes in his introduction to his own book, Howard Frank Mosher and the Classics, Echoes in the Vermont Writer’s Works. “Wanting to learn more about this author, who always seemed to have a little section at those stores reserved for him, I got on my computer and checked with the online MLA Bibliography, but found precious little that had been written about his works, in terms of interpretation.”

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