Independence Day celebrations

Fireworks from the Independence Day celebrations in Barton in 2011.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Fireworks from the Independence Day celebrations in Barton in 2011. Photo by Joseph Gresser

Barton

The parade begins at 2 p.m. on Main Street on Saturday, July 4, with a theme of “Seventieth anniversary end to World War II.” The parade route ends at the fairgrounds, where awards will be given in front of the grandstands around 3 p.m.

Fireworks will be at the fairgrounds at dusk, with no cost to enter after 4 p.m.

Roaring Brook Park

Activities will be held on Saturday, July 4, all day at Roaring Brook Park, home of the Orleans County Fairgrounds. Gates open at 9 a.m., admission is $7; kids under ten are free. Parking is free. The day’s events include an antique and farm stock tractor pull beginning at 9 a.m., a gymkhana horse show at noon, a horse and pony pull at 10 a.m., a horseshoe tournament at 10 a.m., a professional lumberjack roundup at 10 a.m., and the Walbridge family lawn mower and ATV pull at 10 a.m.

There will also be a $2 bounce house for kids, slides from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., face-painting, ice cream, a chicken barbecue, food booths, and more.

Fireworks by the Barton Fire Department will be at dusk. Free admission to the fairgrounds after 4 p.m.

Newport

The Harry Corrow Freedom Run begins at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, July 4, on the bike path in the pines of Prouty Beach. Walkers are welcome. Course choices are a ten-mile, 10K, 5K, or one-mile fun run. Ten percent of all registration fees will go to the Gardner Park Restoration Project and the Memphremagog Ski Touring Foundation. The fee for adults doing a course of ten miles or more is $50; fewer than ten miles is $35. Youth are 50 percent off. Register at dandelionrun.org/2015-harry-corrow-php. Light lunch to follow.

Events at Gardner Memorial Park begin at 3 p.m. with music by the Session Guys. The annual bed races begin at 5 p.m. Anyone interested in registering should contact Andy Cappello of Newport Parks and Recreation at 334-6345.

The Hitmen will play at 7 p.m. The international hula hoop competition begins at 8 p.m. People should bring their own hula hoops. The band Soul Kingdom will play at 8:30 p.m.

Fireworks will fly at 9:45 p.m.

There will be all kinds of food vendors at the park throughout the day, and kayaks will be available to rent at the park from 3 p.m. until dusk.

Greensboro

Fireworks will be at dusk on Friday, July 3, let off on Lake Shore Road, near the ballfield.

The parade is on Saturday, July 4. The lineup starts at around 9:15 a.m., with lineup both at the new fire station and on Lake Shore Road. Anyone is welcome to participate and should just show up. The parade starts promptly at 10 a.m., and ends at the town green where there will be a band, children’s activities, and games.

Also at the town green on July 4, under the tent, there will be a square dance, sponsored by the Greensboro Arts Alliance and Residency, from 7 to 9 p.m. The caller will be Robin Russell, with music by Pete’s Posse. Admission is $5; children under 12 are free. There will also be ice cream, hot dogs, and more.

The Greensboro United Church of Christ will hold its annual chicken barbecue on Saturday, July 4, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Reservations can be made ahead of time. The price remains the same at $10 for a generous plate of barbecue chicken, vinaigrette coleslaw, a roll, beverage, and dessert. Proceeds from this event benefit the work of the church. The barbecue starts immediately after the parade behind the church. Reservations are accepted by e-mail at greensborochurch@gmail.com. Reservations are not considered confirmed unless an e-mail confirmation is sent. Reservations may also be made by calling 533-2223. There are a limited number of meals, so reservations are recommended.

Also, the Greensboro Free Library will hold its annual book sale on July 4, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Westmore

The annual pancake breakfast at the Westmore Fellowship Hall is from 8:30 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, July 4. The menu includes homemade pancakes, Vermont fancy maple syrup, scrambled eggs, ham, and coffee and juice. Donations of $8 for adults, and less for children, according to age, go to the Westmore Community Church Youth Camp Scholarship Fund.

The sixteenth annual Willoughby Boat Parade will be on Saturday, July 4, with “Cartoons on Parade” as the theme. Participants should decorate their boat, canoe, or kayak depicting their favorite Vermont moment. The first-place winners will receive a trophy and $50. The second- and third-place winners get trophies. To be eligible for a prize, boats must be at the starting point by 3:30 p.m. to register and receive a number used by the judges for identification. To pre-register, or for more information, call 673-2043, or e-mail doreenallen64@yahoo.com. Boats entered in the parade will meet off Crescent Beach, on the west side of the lake, at 3:30 p.m. The parade will proceed north along the west shore, cross the north beach, and travel south along the east shore, ending at Trails End, where the winners will be announced. There is no rain date.

The annual Willoughby Lake 5K run and walk will be held on Sunday, July 5, to benefit the Westmore Ladies Aid Scholarship Fund. Doors to the Westmore Community Hall will open at 9 a.m., with the race beginning at 11 a.m. For questions, or to pre-register, call Gail Robitaille at 525-3689.

Derby

The parade will be on Saturday, July 4, starting at 10 a.m. at the Elks Club. It will go down Main Street, past North Country Union Junior High School (NCUJHS) and people can stop at the Nelsons’ barnyard or circle back around to the Elks. There will be a flea market and barbecue in front of NCUJHS. The Boy Scouts will sell food, including hot dogs and hamburgers. There will also be a bounce house. The food will be served starting around 11:30 a.m., and events will continue until around 3 or 4 p.m.

To enter a float in the parade, contact Kurt Brainard at 766-5588.

Island Pond

The weekend’s events kick off on Friday, July 3, with Classic Rewind playing at Pavilion Park, part of Friday Night Live, which runs from 6 to 10 p.m. There will also be a barbecue, local vendors, and a fireworks extravaganza at dusk. The rain date for fireworks is Saturday, July 11.

The parade will be on Saturday, July 4, at 11 a.m. To enter a float in the parade, call Melinda Lamoureux at 723-6130. There will be pony rides behind the Municipal Building from 12 to 3 p.m., and a duck race at 1 p.m., with prizes of $500, $100, and $75. Participants can buy ducks at the Island Pond Welcome Center, Gervais Ace Hardware, Passumpsic Savings Bank, and other participating merchants. For more information, call Jeanne at 723-6138. There is also a townwide scavenger hunt on Saturday, from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m., that starts and ends at the Welcome Center. For more information, call Mike or Tim at 723-0470. At 2 p.m., there will be a boat parade. For more information, call Nate at 723-4218. On Saturday night, the Adams Band will play at Pavilion Park from 6 to 10 p.m.

The cardboard boat race will be on Sunday, July 5, at noon. Allowed materials include cardboard, duct or masking tape, liquid nails, adhesive, latex, paint, and varnish. No flex seal or plastic sheeting. For more information, call Jeanne at 723-6138.

North Troy

The parade will be on Saturday, July 4, starting from the old mill at 11 a.m. The parade will march right up Main Street, down to the American Legion Post #28 home. The legion hopes that children will get involved and decorate their bikes. Old cars and floats are also welcome. Set up for the parade will be around 10 or 10:30 a.m. There will be a chicken barbecue at noon at the legion, with a donation required.

Craftsbury

The Craftsbury Village block party will be from 5 p.m. to dark on Friday, July 3, featuring free barbecue and games for the whole family, and live music from the Eames Brothers, the Craftsbury Chamber Players, and DJ Vu. Fireworks by Andrew Johnson will go off at dusk. The street will be closed between Cemetery and the Creek roads.

For more things to do, see Things to Do in the Northeast Kingdom.

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Relay for Life: Over 400 join the fight against cancer

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The American Cancer Society’s Northeast Kingdom edition of Relay for Life took place in Newport on Saturday night.  Luminarias commemorating cancer victims and survivors were placed along the track at North Country Union High School and lit at nightfall.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

The American Cancer Society’s Northeast Kingdom edition of Relay for Life took place in Newport on Saturday night. Luminarias commemorating cancer victims and survivors were placed along the track at North Country Union High School and lit at nightfall. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 1, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT — The luminaria-lined track at North Country Union High School (NCUHS) was filled with people of all ages talking and laughing Saturday night as they walked to raise money to fight cancer.

Ice-filled kiddie pools at either end of the track kept water bottles cold so participants could rehydrate during their trek.

By Saturday morning 323 people had signed up for the American Cancer Society’s 12-hour Relay for Life in advance. In the evening, 89 more signed up in person, and others came to walk without signing in, or simply to buy a luminaria bag. The relay lasts all night.

People who are signed up are grouped into teams. Thirty-five teams raised…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Antiques and Uniques July 11

 

In Craftsbury, Saturday, this customer is seen through a stained-glass window, handcrafted by Joe Arborio, during the Antiques & Uniques Festival in 2014.  Photo by David Dudley

In Craftsbury, Saturday, this customer is seen through a stained-glass window, handcrafted by Joe Arborio, during the Antiques & Uniques Festival in 2014. Photo by David Dudley

The forty-fifth annual Antiques and Uniques Festival on Craftsbury Common will be held on Saturday, July 11, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The event is free of charge and open to all. The $5 parking donation goes to the Craftsbury Fire Department. This tented event is rain or shine with seating for seniors and games for children.

Festival goers of all ages come to enjoy shopping for antiques and Vermont crafts, sampling local and artisan food and drink, and picnicing outside of the barbecue tent — all of this to a live folk and fiddle musical backdrop.

With over 100 antiques dealers, Vermont craft vendors, and local specialty foods vendors, the crowd of shoppers easily draws thousands. And the demand for the local foods barbecue is something to be impressed by. With 95 percent of its food coming from within a 15-mile radius of Craftsbury, the barbecue tent is a splendiferous feast. Local grass-fed beef from Sawmill Brook Farm, organic sausages from LeBlanc Family Farm, Vermont Smoke and Cure hot dogs, Pete’s Greens’ organic greens, fresh eggs from Still Meadow Farm, and healthy vegan hummus wraps made by the Craftsbury General Store are just some of the foods available. The Cellars at Jasper Hill has been generous with the festival both in donated money and with donated product. The festival gladly tops their burgers and vegetable wraps with their world award-winning cheese.

The Antiques and Uniques Festival has been held the second Saturday in July every year since 1971 on Craftsbury Common.

The town of Craftsbury decided that it’s going to take a village to continue the festival tradition and therefore the entire village should benefit from it. Here’s how it works: Individuals who wish to volunteer for Antiques and Uniques keep track of the work hours they accumulate and choose a Craftsbury nonprofit or organization that they wish to represent. At the end of the event, all proceeds are distributed to the various organizations. This means that the entire town benefits from the festival because of the generosity of the volunteering patrons.

In a society where it’s so easy to throw things away and replace with the newer, faster and better, concepts like appreciating the “old” or “outdated” can seem ridiculous — but not when one slows down enough to explore the rare beauty and individuality of true craftsmanship. When one walks the green of Craftsbury Common and examines the vendors’ antiques and the crafters’ one-of-a-kind pieces, a feeling of awe arises.

For more information, visit townofcraftsbury.com or e-mail AntiquesAndUniquesVT@gmail.com or call (802) 777-8527. — submitted by Anne-Marie Keppel.

For more things to do, see Things to Do in the Northeast Kingdom.

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Les Misérables comes to Orleans

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Katie Kelly, playing the young Cosette, sings “Castle on a Cloud” in the first act of Les Misérables.  The show was put together as part of the Vermont Family Theatre.  Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Katie Kelly, playing the young Cosette, sings “Castle on a Cloud” in the first act of Les Misérables. The show was put together as part of the Vermont Family Theatre. Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle May 6, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

ORLEANS — The cast of Vermont Family Theatre’s Les Misérables nailed the opening night of their show on Friday, remembering every line and singing every note.

Friday was the first of a three-day run of the show, put together by Artistic Director Karen Perry.

It was obvious that all the actors loved the show and gave it their all. The choruses were excellent and very effective, moving the story forward and making hearts race.

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At LR Rocks: Live experience cultures young performers

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April Streeter shows off the electric guitar she played live for the first time.  Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

April Streeter shows off the electric guitar she played live for the first time. Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle February 25, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

COVENTRY — April Streeter, 15, is no stranger to singing in public, but Saturday night’s LR Rocks showcase at Parker Pie Wings did include a first for her — a whirl on the electric guitar in front of a live audience.

“It’s kind of a rush,” she said. “It’s really fun to get up there. The energy is really great, especially in places like this.”

Parker Pie Wings had set up the concert venue on one side of its bar. The smaller space created a packed atmosphere for the 100 people in attendance.

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In Glover: Santa comes to town, in a fire truck

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Alex Young of Glover attempts to toss a miniature wreath on one of the tines of a ten-point buck painted by Lorie Seadale.  Photos by David Dudley

Alex Young of Glover attempts to toss a miniature wreath on one of the tines of a ten-point buck painted by Lorie Seadale. Photos by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle December 17, 2014

by David Dudley

GLOVER — The fire station here was packed with children and their parents Saturday night waiting for Santa to arrive. Though Mr. Claus was late — apparently due to problems with his sled — there were still lots of things to do at the tenth annual Ride a Fire Truck with Santa, held by the Glover Volunteer Fire Department.

But nobody had to remind the children not to pout or cry. They were in the mood to make merry.

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In Charleston: Sixty years of oysters

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Stewmaster Darald Moulton followed a tried and true recipe Saturday at the Charleston Fire Department’s sixtieth annual oyster stew supper.  Photo by Paul Lefebvre

Stewmaster Darald Moulton followed a tried and true recipe Saturday at the Charleston Fire Department’s sixtieth annual oyster stew supper. Photo by Paul Lefebvre

copyright the Chronicle October 8, 2014

by Paul Lefebvre

Sixty years ago a photograph was published of Marilyn Monroe standing over a New York City sidewalk register whose hot air lifted her skirt higher up her legs than anyone expected to see.

Sixty years ago Elvis the Pelvis recorded his first hit, “That’s all Right,” a song sung in such a seductive voice that it went beyond ballistic as soon as people saw him perform it.

And 60 years ago, the volunteer firemen of Charleston held their first fund-raiser, an oyster stew supper that has gone on to become an annual event in a region known for its chicken pie suppers and strawberry shortcake.

How to explain the popularity of oyster stew in landlocked country nearly half a day’s drive from the ocean?

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Entrepreneurs pitch ideas in a Lowell barn

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Trish Sears is reflected in a mirror as entrepreneur Justin Larose presents his pitch.  Photos by Bethany M. Dunbar

Trish Sears is reflected in a mirror as entrepreneur Justin Larose presents his pitch. Photos by Bethany M. Dunbar

copyright the Chronicle August 13, 2014

by Bethany M. Dunbar

LOWELL — What do a doggie treat maker, someone who wants to make an alcoholic tea, and an online marketing consultant have in common? They were all gathered in a barn in Lowell last week to make business pitches to a group of people who have the wisdom and financial resources to help them make their small businesses grow into big ones.

It was the first annual Barn Pitch, held Thursday, August 7.

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At Newport Aquafest: A selfie with an iguana?

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Jeffrey Stuart of Manchester, Connecticut, gets a strong start for the ten-mile Kingdom Swim.  His butterfly stroke earned him first place in the annual open water race, which was held as part of Newport’s Aquafest, in Lake Memphremagog.  Mr. Stuart finished in four hours, 20 minutes, and 17 seconds, more than three minutes ahead of his closest competitor, Cole Gindhart, of Cibolo, Texas.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Jeffrey Stuart of Manchester, Connecticut, gets a strong start for the ten-mile Kingdom Swim. His butterfly stroke earned him first place in the annual open water race, which was held as part of Newport’s Aquafest, in Lake Memphremagog. Mr. Stuart finished in four hours, 20 minutes, and 17 seconds, more than three minutes ahead of his closest competitor, Cole Gindhart, of Cibolo, Texas. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle July 16, 2014

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — The weather was kind to Newport this weekend, and people enthusiastically turned out for the city’s Aquafest. A celebration of life on the shores of Lake Memphremagog, the event is in its fifth year since its revival in 2009.

The traditional events associated with the festival, such as the Kingdom Swim and the Swimmers and Pet Parade, were included in the festivities with a few tweaks to keep them fresh.

While Newport’s Main Street was closed off for the parade and a street dance Friday evening, the entire city was open for business Sunday.

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Dandelion Run was in memory of Terri Weed

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The Bag Ladies of Newfane and Townsend warmed up for their race.  They are:  Sandy Stark, Melanie Keiser, Penelope Monaney, Kimberly McCormack, and Kim Colligan.  Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

The Bag Ladies of Newfane and Townsend warmed up for their race. They are: Sandy Stark, Melanie Keiser, Penelope Monaney, Kimberly McCormack, and Kim Colligan. Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

copyright the Chronicle 5-21-2014

by Bethany M. Dunbar

DERBY — Pouring rain early Saturday morning let off in time for a few hundred runners to take to the roadsides at 9 a.m. in the sixth annual Dandelion Run.

One relay team was ready for the rain with a kind of team uniform — garbage bags with holes for heads and arms. The ladies called themselves the Bag Ladies of Newfane and did a dry dance to scare the rain away.  Valerie Dillon manned the staff parking area fully equipped with head-to-toe rain gear, a fisherman-type hat, and an umbrella.

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