Larcher explains life on a small scale dairy in France

Featured

Cheese expert Ivan Larcher inaugurates Sterling College’s new Common House with a lecture on small-scale environmentally conscious dairy farming on August 20.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Cheese expert Ivan Larcher inaugurates Sterling College’s new Common House with a lecture on small-scale environmentally conscious dairy farming on August 20. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle September 2, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

CRAFTSBURY COMMON — A master cheesemaker whose work takes him to every continent but Antarctica finds true happiness on a small farm in central France. It’s not hard to imagine that as the elevator pitch for a Hollywood movie, but for Ivan Larcher it’s just life.

Mr. Larcher told his stories and laid out some of the economic realities of life on his small farm in a short talk sponsored by Sterling College in its new Common House — formerly ArtHouse — on Thursday, August 20.

After graduating from an elite French college for dairy professionals, Mr. Larcher was hired by a global company and sent to Japan to advise its sales staff as it sold starter cultures to cheesemakers. His territory — northeastern Asia — included Korea and China, as well as Japan.

Within a year, Mr. Larcher said, he realized the job was not for him.

“I was recommending the best starters for…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

David Budbill’s opera returns to the Kingdom

Featured

After a neighbor criticizes her behavior, Grace (Mary Bonhag) vents her anger at her prying neighbors. Photo by Joseph Gresser.

After a neighbor criticizes her behavior, Grace (Mary Bonhag) vents her anger at her prying neighbors. Photo by Joseph Gresser.

copyright the Chronicle September 2, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

MONTPELIER — Many people think of opera as an art that’s far removed from their daily concerns. That may or may not be the case with the traditional repertory, but the people who inhabit A Fleeting Animal, the collaboration between poet David Budbill (formerly of Wolcott) and Brookfield composer Erik Nielsen, will be recognizable to anyone in the Northeast Kingdom.

The opera had its premiere and a Vermont tour 15 years ago. Those who missed it then have another chance when the show returns for a six-town tour between September 11 and September 20. It will hit the Kingdom on Sunday, September 13, for a 4 p.m. performance at the Hardwick Town House.

On Monday evening the cast and production crew were hard at work putting the…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

History as seen through the novels of Jeffrey Lent

Featured

A novel by Jeffrey Lent

A novel by Jeffrey Lent

copyright the Chronicle September 2, 2015

by Paul Lefebvre

History as seen in the novels of Jeffrey Lent: In the Fall (542 pages), published in 1999 by Atlantic Monthly Press, and A Slant of Light (357 pages) published in 2015 published by Bloomsbury.

To write out of time, or write imaginatively about a century that transpired 100 years ago, is a tricky proposition for any writer to undertake. Historical novels have evolved to become a genre of their own, but the best ones are arguably those that focus on a particular event. The one that comes readily to mind is the American Civil War novel Killer Angels, written by Michael Shaara. It’s a novel so good at recreating the pivotal three-day battle of Gettysburg that more than one reader has mistaken imaginary characters for real ones.

Much of the novel did revolve around…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

East Albany Catholic church is likely to be sold

Featured

The nearly 150-year-old Catholic church here could go up for sale soon.  Photo by Tena Starr

The nearly 150-year-old Catholic church here could go up for sale soon. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle August 26, 2015

EAST ALBANY — The nearly 150-year-old Catholic church here could go up for sale soon.

Mass hasn’t been said at the church for some time now, but it has been used for weddings, baptisms, funerals, and until a few years ago there were services on Catholic holidays, said longtime parishioner Paul Daniels.

Mr. Daniels provided a tour of the old church on Sunday, a church his Irish ancestors helped build starting in 1869, he said. He’s feeling nostalgic about its demise, which has come about both through lack of attendance and the need for repairs, said parish priest Tim Naples.

The problem is a financial one, not particular to St. John of the Cross Church, but to the entire Most Holy Trinity Parish, which includes…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

Holding on to the summer

Featured

A glass of mote con huesillo graces a garden on a warm summer morning.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

A glass of mote con huesillo graces a garden on a warm summer morning. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle August 26, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

When it comes to summer I have always been a pessimist. As a child I looked forward to the Fourth of July, but considered the summer over the next day. That was, mind you, in a place where basil keeps growing into October.

Here my pessimism passes for realism. Summer is short and every warm day is precious.

Over the years I have come to realize that I don’t measure time in the summer by the calendar, but instead by where we are on the continuum of summer fruits.

The earliest days of clement weather are marked for me by the emergence of rhubarb stalks, followed, never quickly enough, by strawberries.

After strawberries come blueberries, black currents, then raspberries. Although we are a…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

West Glover high drive collapses

Featured

Pictured here next to the remains of the high drive roof on the left is the Coe family.  James Coe and Nella Cargioli Coe are in the back, and their children Isabella Coe (left) and Jude Coe (right) are in the front.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Pictured here next to the remains of the high drive roof on the left is the Coe family. James Coe and Nella Cargioli Coe are in the back, and their children Isabella Coe (left) and Jude Coe (right) are in the front. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle August 26, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

WEST GLOVER — The old high drive at the Andersonville Farm here collapsed on Thursday, August 13, after an employee drove under it in a “silage dump truck with its tailgate up,” operational owner James Coe said.

“It’s supposed to go down on its own,” he said about the stuck tailgate.

No one was injured in the accident.

“I didn’t know what to think,” said Dennis Poginy, another employee.

He assumed that wind had blown the already weak structure over.

“That’s what you get for leaving the farm,” Mr. Coe said, laughing.

He was at Parker Pie in West Glover with his wife, Nella Cargioli Coe, when the accident happened. They had just celebrated their wedding anniversary the day before.

They’ve been the operating owners since…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

Hemenways celebrate 75 years together

Featured

Jim and Shirley Hemenway in the living room of the house where Mr. Hemenway was born and where they have spent 72 of their 75 years together.  Mr. Hemenway is 96, Mrs. Hemenway is 92.  The house is filled with Mr. Hemenway’s woodworking and Mrs. Hemenway’s quilts, along with her collection of blue willow, family photos and many other mementos of a long life. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Jim and Shirley Hemenway in the living room of the house where Mr. Hemenway was born and where they have spent 72 of their 75 years together. Mr. Hemenway is 96, Mrs. Hemenway is 92. The house is filled with Mr. Hemenway’s woodworking and Mrs. Hemenway’s quilts, along with her collection of blue willow, family photos and many other mementos of a long life. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle August 19, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

ORLEANS — The young couple stood in front of the camera on their wedding day. She was very young, dressed like a schoolgirl except for a sequined flapper-style cap and a lace collar livening up the neck of her dress. Her smile was shy but radiant. He was a little older, handsome in his best suit. It was August 20, 1940.

Seventy-five years later, Shirley and Fern “Jim” Hemenway of Orleans looked back at their long life together, which began the day that photo was taken.

They’re about to celebrate an anniversary that few couples see. He is 96, she is 92. He’s hard of hearing now, and has lost much of his vision, but he still has a dry wit. Her feet have lost their lightness and her smile its girlish shyness, but it’s still the biggest thing about her.

Over the years, the couple has raised six children — three biological children, and…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

New Yorkers give the Holland Community Church a facelift

Featured

A church group came all the way from New York to renovate the Holland Community Church last week.  Here the group poses in front of the church they had been working on all week.  They were in the process of finishing the reinstallation of the vinyl siding before returning to their homes on Saturday.  Pictured here, in the top row, from left to right, are Bob Zuber, Jason Newell, and Bill Weyer.  In the next row, from left to right, are Tino Almodovar, Aaron Abrahamsen, wearing a black shirt and a crucifix, Justin Zuber, and Ed Conti.  In the next row down, are Joshua Harvey, who is wearing a spotted shirt, James Houston, Lori Buck, with braids in her hair, and Vincent Pappalardo.  In the next row, from left to right, are Joanne Parzuchowski, with glasses on her head, Ed Parzuchowski, Pat Kelly, and Tiffany Hervas.  In the front row, are Amy Ciofrone, Hope Harvey, Suzanne Phinkham, and Jared Parzuchowski.  Harry Kelly and Lou Samaritano, who aren’t in the picture, were also part of the group.  Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

A church group came all the way from New York to renovate the Holland Community Church last week. Here the group poses in front of the church they had been working on all week. They were in the process of finishing the reinstallation of the vinyl siding before returning to their homes on Saturday. Pictured here, in the top row, from left to right, are Bob Zuber, Jason Newell, and Bill Weyer. In the next row, from left to right, are Tino Almodovar, Aaron Abrahamsen, wearing a black shirt and a crucifix, Justin Zuber, and Ed Conti. In the next row down, are Joshua Harvey, who is wearing a spotted shirt, James Houston, Lori Buck, with braids in her hair, and Vincent Pappalardo. In the next row, from left to right, are Joanne Parzuchowski, with glasses on her head, Ed Parzuchowski, Pat Kelly, and Tiffany Hervas. In the front row, are Amy Ciofrone, Hope Harvey, Suzanne Phinkham, and Jared Parzuchowski. Harry Kelly and Lou Samaritano, who aren’t in the picture, were also part of the group. Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle August 19, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

HOLLAND — The Holland Community Church got a makeover last week when a team from New York drove up to repaint, refurbish, and generally spiff up the place.

“It’s absolutely overwhelming,” said Vi Hauver, a member of the church. “They were just beyond words.”

“I’ve known these people for a good number of years,” Holland Community Church Pastor John Genco said. “I was ordained through the organization that they are a part of.”

When he discovered that there was a mission team, he called and applied to get help with construction work.

Jason Newell was the leader of about 20 people from Smithtown Gospel Tabernacle Church in Smithtown, New York, who…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

What to do with all those plums?

Featured

WEB Ruminations plums cmykcopyright the Chronicle August 19, 2015

by Tena Starr  

This is the time of year when we have what we call “summer food” dinners. Mainly those dinners are about the vegetables. It’s a time of year when it’s a pleasure to cook.

People often talk about having to sneak vegetables into their children’s food. With two children and three grandchildren who have rarely refused a vegetable, who snack on vegetables, it seems to me that kids do not have an inherent dislike of them — they somehow learn it.

Maybe they were fed too many canned green beans, maybe they think of vegetables as overcooked mush instead of crisp and crunchy. Maybe they developed a taste, along the way, for…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

Heath Orchard apples destroyed by hailstorms

Featured

Heath Orchard in Canada lost nearly its entire crop for this year after three hailstorms hit in three weeks.  Updates on when the orchard will be open this year will be posted on their website at vergerheathorchard.com.  Photo by Xander Jean

Heath Orchard in Canada lost nearly its entire crop for this year after three hailstorms hit in three weeks. Updates on when the orchard will be open this year will be posted on their website at vergerheathorchard.com. Photo by Xander Jean

copyright the Chronicle August 12, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph 

STANSTEAD, QUEBEC — Picking apples at Heath Orchard in Canada is a tradition for many, but this year will be different.

The 100-year-old orchard was hit hard by three separate hailstorms — one in mid-July and two in early August — that destroyed or damaged the entire crop.

“When the first storm came, we were in shock,” co-owner Chris Rawlings said. “When the second one came, we started crying. When the third one came….”

He threw his hands into the air as if to say, what can you do?

He and his wife and co-owner, Lynn Heath, run the orchard.

“This is uncharted territory,” Ms. Heath said.

Nothing like this has ever happened in…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share