Veterans tell students their stories

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copyright the Chronicle November 15, 2017

 

by Joseph Gresser

 

NEWPORT — Newport City Elementary School fifth and sixth grades got a glimpse of life in the military when they welcomed a dozen veterans to their classrooms Thursday morning, November 9.

The men, who among them saw service from World War II through the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, shared stories of their experiences just in time for Veterans Day.

Representing all branches of the military except the Navy and Coast Guard — perhaps fitting given the distance between Newport and the sea — the veterans introduced themselves with a brief sketch of their history in the service before opening the floor to questions.

The questions ranged widely from the serious to the funny.

“Were you ever wounded?” a student asked one group of veterans. Fortunately the answer was no.

The students had other questions about the more difficult aspects of life in war. What happened when someone got wounded? one asked.

Butch Provencher, a National Guardsman with a specialty as a medic, said the objective was always to get the hurt person to a base camp hospital as quickly as possible.

On a lighter note, one sixth-grader wanted to know how the food was. The seven vets who were in the classroom looked at each other and laughed before replying.

“Green eggs and ham,” one replied.

The real answer, said Richard Deuso a Vietnam veteran, is C-rations, tinned food soldiers carried with them when away from their base.

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Students learn flag folding techniques in time for Veterans Day

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St. Paul’s School students learned how to respect and fold the flag on Thursday when members of the American Legion came by.   Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

St. Paul’s School students learned how to respect and fold the flag on Thursday when members of the American Legion came by. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle November 11, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

BARTON — Many eager hands shot into the air when American Legion State Commander Frederick E. LaTour of Barton asked for flag-folding volunteers at St. Paul’s School on Thursday.

St. Paul’s students learned how to properly care for and respect the American flag when members of the American Legion, equipped with flags and a documentary, came to the school and showed the kids how to properly fold a flag.

“It’s important for them to learn how to respect the flags, how to respect the veterans,” said Angie Poginy, who organized the activity.

They kicked off the session with a viewing of the film For Which It Stands about a boy who writes a paper about the flag, and how he came to understand and respect it more.

It starts with an argument between him and his brother, a war veteran and firefighter, who steals his baseball cap when the boy refuses… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Bel-Aire veterans are feted

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Sergeant Major Retired John Wilson (left) had only a few days notice to pull together an event to honor World War Two veterans at the Bel-Aire Quality Care Nursing Center in Newport on Tuesday. With Mr. Wilson, from left to right are Dick Baraw, a Korean-era Army veteran and a former mayor of Newport; Mr. Wilson's daughter Jennifer Wilson; Vietnam veteran Robert Davio; and Francis Ormsbee, who served in the Air Force in Korea. In short speeches, the veterans expressed their gratitude to the ten World War II veterans who stay at Bel-Aire. Miss Wilson's fourth-grade class at St. Paul's School in Barton made cards. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Sergeant Major Retired John Wilson (left) had only a few days notice to pull together an event to honor World War Two veterans at the Bel-Aire Quality Care Nursing Center in Newport on Tuesday. With Mr. Wilson, from left to right are Dick Baraw, a Korean-era Army veteran and a former mayor of Newport; Mr. Wilson’s daughter Jennifer Wilson; Vietnam veteran Robert Davio; and Francis Ormsbee, who served in the Air Force in Korea. In short speeches, the veterans expressed their gratitude to the ten World War II veterans who stay at Bel-Aire. Miss Wilson’s fourth-grade class at St. Paul’s School in Barton made cards. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle November 11, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

NEWPORT — Jennifer Wilson’s fourth-grade class at St. Paul’s School in Barton made 83 cards for area veterans this year to thank them for their service to the country. The project took the children more than two weeks. Most of the cards were mailed last week, but on Tuesday morning, at a special event at the Bel-Aire Quality Care Center in Newport, the children had a chance to meet ten World War II veterans and personally hand them cards.

The occasion was a special ceremony planned to honor the veterans, now in their nineties, by Jennifer Wilson’s father, Sergeant Major Retired John Wilson.

Mr. Wilson, a familiar figure… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Pete Cocoros’ trumpet takes him from Brooklyn to Barton, the long way

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Pete Cocoros, veteran, trumpeter, and photographer, plays “Taps” in Glover on Memorial Day, 2013.  Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

Pete Cocoros, veteran, trumpeter, and photographer, plays “Taps” in Glover on Memorial Day, 2013. Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

copyright the Chronicle December 23, 2014

by Joseph Gresser

BARTON — As he hears a visitor pull into the dooryard of his camp, only a stone’s throw from Crystal Lake, Pete Cocoros pokes the bell of his trumpet out his door and blows a fanfare. It proves to be an apt prelude to a two-hour conversation about music and the adventurous path blazed by a horn.

Mr. Cocoros has performed for generals, played before thousands at Radio City Music Hall in New York City, entertained troops in Iceland, Morocco, and Greece, and set people to dancing all over the United States.

Most people who know him these days think of Pete Cocoros as the man whose playing of “Taps” brings tears to the eyes of those gathered to celebrate Veterans and Memorial days in Barton. Or they know him as the man whose photographs of local school band concerts appear in the Chronicle a few times a year.

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