A week in Haiti: On sports, treasure hunting, and life

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The door of one of the many artisan shops in Port-au-Prince.  Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

The door of one of the many artisan shops in Port-au-Prince. Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle December 22, 2015

This article is Part III in a series about Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph’s recent trip to Haiti where she visited family and worked as a translator at an international conference aimed at building up the nursing profession in Haiti. She interpreted the presentations in French and Creole to English for the Anglophones, and the English presentations to French for the Francophones.

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Sports

When the conference in Port-au-Prince is over, I stay with my godfather near Croix-des-Bouquets, a village that seems to melt into Haiti’s capital, Port-au-Prince.

That area is located on a plain, so it’s much hotter than where the conference hotel was located. I got there after dark and my godfather and his wife welcomed me with fresh watermelon juice and dinner.

I spent the next day relaxing, and in the evening, I switched on the television to intermittently watch the soccer game while I read my book.

Soccer is a very popular sport in Haiti. I chose not to watch the game too closely, knowing that I would get invested quickly if I did.

I felt a twinge of regret knowing… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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A week in Haiti: From nightlife to history

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People partied on the seminary beach in Montrouis during a day off on November 18, for the commemoration of the battle of Vertière, the final battle before Haiti declared its independence. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle December 16, 2015

This article is Part II in a series about Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph’s recent trip to Haiti where she visited family and worked as a translator at an international conference aimed at building up the nursing profession in Haiti. She interpreted the presentations in French and Creole to English for the Anglophones, and the English presentations to French for the Francophones.

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Nightlife

After an exhausting conference, and steadily becoming antsier from staying in the relative seclusion of the hotel, a few of us decided to go out on the town.

Partying on Sunday night in Port-au-Prince is a challenge. People have to go to work on Monday, so the conference organizer wasn’t sure what we would find.

Apparently, the best night for partying in Haiti is Friday. People go to church on Sunday morning, so staying out late on Saturday night isn’t an option.

The conference organizer’s friend managed… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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In Greensboro: After 114 years, Willey’s Store remains famously eclectic

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Robert Willey-Hurst, current president of Willey's Store, Inc., has worked tirelessly these past six years to see that the store remains a community center.  Photos by David Dudley

Robert Willey-Hurst, current president of Willey’s Store, Inc., has worked tirelessly these past six years to see that the store remains a community center. Photos by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle December 3, 2014

by David Dudley

GREENSBORO — While stories about Black Friday’s frenzied shopping flooded the Internet, the day after Thanksgiving began like any other at Willey’s Store, which is now in its one hundred and fourteenth year of operation.

Robert Willey-Hurst, president of the Willey’s Store, Inc., opened the store at 7 a.m. as usual. The only thing he did differently was stretch the annual winter sale, which usually runs for a single weekend, into a two-week event this year.

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Quebec man makes 400-mile sojourn on foot

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Regent Hurtubise finds rest and an omelet at Paddie's Snack Bar in North Troy Saturday morning.  Photos by David Dudley

Regent Hurtubise finds rest and an omelet at Paddie’s Snack Bar in North Troy Saturday morning. Photos by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle August 6, 2014 

by David Dudley

DERBY — If you were driving along Route 105 this past weekend, or Route 5 on Monday, chances are you passed a well-tanned man, walking, pushing a cart with bicycle wheels alongside the road, accompanied by his dog. On Monday afternoon, he rambled his way through Derby, on his fiftieth consecutive day of walking this summer.

That man is Regent Hurtubise, 66, of Chartierville, Quebec, which is just across the New Hampshire border. His beloved dog, who travels with him, is named Rocky. Though Mr. Hurtubise may look, at first glance, like a drifter, he is a homeowner in Quebec, living off a pension from the Canadian government. Mr. Hurtubise and Rocky are on the final leg of a 400-mile walk.

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