Storm chasing — sometimes you win, sometimes you lose

Featured

copyright the Chronicle August 3, 2016

by Steve Maleski

May 25, mid-afternoon, and we are east of Newton, Kansas, in the middle of a slim wedge of very unstable air extruded northward from a reservoir of moist, hot tropical air resident over east Texas and eastern Oklahoma. The tip of the wedge is near Manhattan, Kansas, about 100 miles farther north. A weak outflow boundary left by thunderstorms the previous day is in the vicinity; farther north is a warm front. Both boundaries will provide lift and low-level turning of the wind field that will be adequate to support supercells. The bigger question is: Which boundary should we focus on?

To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper)

Share

Ask the weatherman: They call it thundersnow

Featured

Wind from the Valentine's Day snowstorm made for some big dunes and interesting sculptures, like this cresting wave that formed on a West Glover porch.  Photo by Nathaniel Gordon

Wind from the Valentine’s Day snowstorm made for some big dunes and interesting sculptures, like this cresting wave that formed on a West Glover porch. Photo by Nathaniel Gordon

copyright the Chronicle February 19, 2014

Question:  At around 3:30 a.m. Friday, out of the corner of my eye, I saw a flash of lightning in the middle of a snowstorm.  I have since Googled it and now know it wasn’t an alien taking our photo (my other theory at that hour, since I didn’t think lightning during a snowstorm was possible.)

Answer:  Between 3 and 4 a.m. on the morning of this past Friday, February 14, some people were awakened by lightning and/or thunder.  Reports were received from Barnet, St. Johnsbury, and Barton.  Very heavy snow fell from then until about 7 a.m.  Snowfall rates of 2-3 inches per hour were noted.

Continue reading

Share