Glover woman qualifies to compete in Olympic trials

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Leah Frost stands before a few of the many race bibs that decorate a wall of her Glover apartment.  Photos by Joseph Gresser

Leah Frost stands before a few of the many race bibs that decorate a wall of her Glover apartment. Photos by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle December 16, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

GLOVER — Leah Frost, who won the title of “Fastest Woman in Glover” at the 2013 and 2014 Glover Day Chamberlain Run, has earned the chance to match her mettle against some of her running heroes. A time of 2:42:52 in the California International Marathon means she has qualified to compete in trials for a slot on the U.S. Women’s Olympic Team.

The race was held in Sacramento, California, on December 6.

Ms. Frost, who lives in Glover, said Monday that she is under no illusion that she will be one of those chosen to represent the U.S. in the 2016 Olympic Games to be held in Rio De Janeiro next August. To do that, she said, would require her to cut around 20 minutes from her time.

If the weather stays as it has been and she’s able to train hard, Ms. Frost said she… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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In Glover: What you never knew about the toothbrush

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Clare Dolan, the guiding intelligence of the Museum of Everyday Life, stands outside of her young institution alongside a giant toothbrush built by Newark artist Martin McGowan.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Clare Dolan, the guiding intelligence of the Museum of Everyday Life, stands outside of her young institution alongside a giant toothbrush built by Newark artist Martin McGowan. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 25, 2014

by Joseph Gresser

GLOVER — The word “everyday” means usual or common. It might seem, then, that the Museum of Everyday Life would be a humdrum collection of boring objects. The selection of themes covered in the museum’s four-year history — matches, safety pins, pencils, and, now, toothbrushes — might do nothing to change that view.

A visit to the museum, though, quickly upends any such preconception. Curator Clare Dolan has filled an old dairy barn with a collection of exhibits that uses dental hygiene alone as a lens through which to view the world.

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