Better a writer than a robber: Howard Mosher reflects on the Kingdom and its characters

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Irasburg author Howard Mosher said he had two aspirations as a younger man: To be a writer and/or a bank robber. With more than a dozen books behind him, he’s been successful enough at the first, fortunately, that he hasn’t had to resort to the second. But there’s always wishful thinking. Here, he poses with a couple of guns in front of the former Howard Bank in Orleans, which was the victim of a robbery.

Irasburg author Howard Mosher said he had two aspirations as a younger man: To be a writer and/or a bank robber. With more than a dozen books behind him, he’s been successful enough at the first, fortunately, that he hasn’t had to resort to the second. But there’s always wishful thinking. Here, he poses with a couple of guns in front of the former Howard Bank in Orleans, which was the victim of a robbery.

copyright the Chronicle September 30, 2015

by Tena Starr  

Writer Howard Mosher landed in Orleans County in 1964. He and his wife, Phillis, were in their twenties, schoolteachers looking for work, and they both ended up with jobs at what was then Orleans High School.

They were in the village searching for the school, their new place of employment, on a day when the streets were all but deserted. They noticed two men engaged in a fistfight on the railroad tracks. Mr. Mosher, astonished today at his audacity, interrupted the fight by rolling down his car window and asking if the gentlemen could tell him where the school was.

They could do better than that, they said. They could show him. Blind drunk, Mr. Mosher said, the pair piled into the back seat of the car and proceeded to take them on a meandering tour of Orleans, eventually finding the school.

Mission accomplished, the two men got out and wandered off, arms around… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Putting Mosher in the pantheon

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howard mosher webcopyright the Chronicle July 2, 2014

Howard Frank Mosher and the Classics, Echoes in the Vermont Writer’s Works, by James Robert Saunders. 208 pages. Softcover. Published by McFarland. $45.

Reviewed by Tena Starr

Four years ago, in June of 2010, Purdue University professor James Robert Saunders went to hear Howard Mosher of Irasburg give a talk on his latest book, Walking to Gatlinburg.

“I had already read that particular work as well as the other ten books that he had written up to that point, books that I would see, off and on, when I visited the independent booksellers that are a mainstay of Vermont’s literary enterprise,” Mr. Saunders writes in his introduction to his own book, Howard Frank Mosher and the Classics, Echoes in the Vermont Writer’s Works. “Wanting to learn more about this author, who always seemed to have a little section at those stores reserved for him, I got on my computer and checked with the online MLA Bibliography, but found precious little that had been written about his works, in terms of interpretation.”

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Chris Braithwaite will be in NENPA Hall of Fame

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Chris Braithwaite, hard at work at the Chronicle office working on this week’s newspaper, in Barton Tuesday. Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

copyright the Chronicle 1-15-2014

by Bethany M. Dunbar

BARTON — Chronicle founder and publisher Chris Braithwaite will be inducted into the New England Newspaper and Press Association (NENPA) Hall of Fame in February.

Mr. Braithwaite and five other newspaper professionals will be honored at the NENPA winter convention and annual meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, on February 7. Continue reading

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