Holiday food

Featured

Haitian Independence Day soup.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Haitian Independence Day soup. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle January 6, 2016

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Eating is a huge part of the holidays. People get together to be merry around a heavily laden table.

And every year, people stuff their faces before adopting New Year’s resolutions to shed pounds.

The holidays are about traditions, too, and there are many. In my family, turkey is reserved for Thanksgiving, so we have lamb or ham at our Christmas meal.

For me, Christmas is also about lack of sleep, and running on adrenaline. I do as much cooking as I can on Christmas Eve, then drive to my cousin’s house, where my Haitian family meets to start the holiday season by celebrating my little cousin’s birthday.

I leave early to sing at church for midnight Mass, then race home to finish cooking… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

A week in Haiti: On sports, treasure hunting, and life

Featured

The door of one of the many artisan shops in Port-au-Prince.  Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

The door of one of the many artisan shops in Port-au-Prince. Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle December 22, 2015

This article is Part III in a series about Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph’s recent trip to Haiti where she visited family and worked as a translator at an international conference aimed at building up the nursing profession in Haiti. She interpreted the presentations in French and Creole to English for the Anglophones, and the English presentations to French for the Francophones.

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Sports

When the conference in Port-au-Prince is over, I stay with my godfather near Croix-des-Bouquets, a village that seems to melt into Haiti’s capital, Port-au-Prince.

That area is located on a plain, so it’s much hotter than where the conference hotel was located. I got there after dark and my godfather and his wife welcomed me with fresh watermelon juice and dinner.

I spent the next day relaxing, and in the evening, I switched on the television to intermittently watch the soccer game while I read my book.

Soccer is a very popular sport in Haiti. I chose not to watch the game too closely, knowing that I would get invested quickly if I did.

I felt a twinge of regret knowing… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

 

Share

A week in Haiti: From nightlife to history

Featured

WEB Haiti vertiere cmyk

People partied on the seminary beach in Montrouis during a day off on November 18, for the commemoration of the battle of Vertière, the final battle before Haiti declared its independence. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle December 16, 2015

This article is Part II in a series about Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph’s recent trip to Haiti where she visited family and worked as a translator at an international conference aimed at building up the nursing profession in Haiti. She interpreted the presentations in French and Creole to English for the Anglophones, and the English presentations to French for the Francophones.

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Nightlife

After an exhausting conference, and steadily becoming antsier from staying in the relative seclusion of the hotel, a few of us decided to go out on the town.

Partying on Sunday night in Port-au-Prince is a challenge. People have to go to work on Monday, so the conference organizer wasn’t sure what we would find.

Apparently, the best night for partying in Haiti is Friday. People go to church on Sunday morning, so staying out late on Saturday night isn’t an option.

The conference organizer’s friend managed… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

Novel brings Haitian slave children to light

Featured

WEB review gold exchangecopyright the Chronicle February 11, 2015

Reviewed by Tena Starr

The Gold Exchange, Exposing Haiti’s Child Slavery System, by Susan Belding. Paperback. 273 pages. Published by Willoughby Gap Press. $8.14 on Amazon.

Susan Belding (who many of you would know as Susan Ferland) is a former Lake Region Union High School English teacher. She now lives in Florida, where until last month, she continued to teach, although to a quite different student body than the Northeast Kingdom’s. Many of her students have been Haitian, and those students inspired her to write The Gold Exchange, a young adult, coming of age novel that takes a look at Haiti’s deplorable restavek system.

Continue reading

Share