At NCUHS: Board won’t hire a principal

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copyright the Chronicle May 25, 2016 

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — North Country Union High School will do without a principal next year. The board decided not to hire its most recent candidate, Chris Smith, after a lengthy meeting held in executive session Monday evening.

According to North Country Supervisory Union Superintendent John Castle, the board had come up with an option it could put in place if a new principal could not be found by the end of the current school year.

It calls for assistant principals Anita Mayhew and Bob Davis and Director of Special Programs Jessica Puckett to share responsibility for the day-to-day management of the school during the 2016-2017 school year, Mr. Castle said. They will assume their new roles on July 1.

Mr. Castle said he and the board members will work together before the board’s June meeting to define each administrator’s job.

Before making their decision, the board and several parents met Chris Smith, a finalist…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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School leaders weigh in on OCSU merger plans

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copyright the Chronicle May 18, 2016

by Elizabeth Trail

Since early spring, representatives of the Orleans Central Supervisory Union (OCSU) merger study committee have been holding informational meetings in anticipation of the school district merger vote scheduled for June 7.

Although the study committee is strongly recommending that communities vote for the merger, not everyone has bought wholeheartedly into the committee members’ arguments.  “I’d love to see a public debate about this, with speakers from both sides,” said Todd Rivver, principal of Albany Community School.  “The supervisory union has done a very effective job of presenting their side, but we really haven’t heard any other point of view.”

Within the OCSU, the debate, if any, is muted.

“I have the opportunity as superintendent to see the successes and challenges each district…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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State approves consolidation plan for OCSU

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copyright the Chronicle April 20, 2016

by Elizabeth Trail

BARTON — The State Board of Education on Tuesday unanimously approved the Orleans Central Supervisory Union’s (OCSU) plan for a consolidated school district.

Meanwhile the committee that has been working on that plan is holding informational meetings in the OCSU towns that will vote on consolidation in June.

Only three members of the public showed up at the meeting at the Barton Graded School on Saturday norming.

The meeting covered the articles of agreement that the state had to approve before the school district merger vote on June 7.

“You should have more people here,” said Grace Mason, a resident of Barton and former town clerk. “I made it clear to all my friends that they should come to this meeting, but as you can see, they didn’t.”

“There is a lot of misinformation out there,” said Amy Leroux…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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At NCUHS: Berrios offered job as principal

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copyright the Chronicle April 13, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT – Members of the North Country Union High School Board met Monday and interviewed the two finalists hoping to succeed Bill Rivard as the school’s principal.  Mr. Rivard will leave the school after 14 years on the job.

North Country Supervisory Union Superintendent John Castle said Tuesday evening that the board decided to offer the position to Andrew Berrios, who is currently interim principal at Smith Academy.…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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In Holland: Meeting set to discuss failed school budget

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copyright the Chronicle March 9, 2016

by Tena Starr

HOLLAND – The school board here plans to hold a public meeting on Monday, March 14, at 6 p.m.  Board members hope that Holland’s voters will tell them how to move forward in the wake of last week’s budget defeat, or at least why they voted the way they did.

The budget, which is voted on by Australian ballot, was rejected 94-79 despite the fact that it had been cut by about $80,000 from the previous year.

At the same time, Holland voters approved their share of the North Country Union High School and junior high school budgets.

The town school budget was down for the second year in a row, but because of…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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No plans to consolidate at NCSU

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copyright the Chronicle February 3, 2016

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

While the Orleans Central Supervisory Union (OCSU) prepares to go ahead with consolidation under Act 46, North Country Supervisory Union (NCSU) Superintendent John Castle is against the idea.

The NCSU hasn’t moved towards consolidating at all, he said.  Instead, it will have what the law calls an alternative structure, where it will remain a supervisory union and its districts will keep their own school boards.

“I advocated strongly against the adoption of the law,” Mr. Castle said.  “I’ve had real concerns…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Community mourns Creative Minds closure

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copyright the Chronicle February 3, 2016

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT – Shortcomings in both early childhood education policy and funding have made it impossible for Creative Minds Children’s Center in Newport Center to stay open, founder and owner Jody Marquis told the community Monday night at a meeting at the North Country Career Center.

The Newport Center childcare provider will close its doors on February 26, following several years of struggling to make ends meet.  Nearly 50 children were attending when the decision to close was made.

“It’s a very emotional day…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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OCSU committee approves plan for consolidation

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copyright the Chronicle January 27, 2016

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

The Orleans Central Supervisory Union (OCSU) Act 46 study committee is recommending early consolidation in order to take advantage of the tax breaks it offers.

On Tuesday, the committee approved articles of agreement that spell out what a consolidated district, the Orleans Central Unified Union School District, will look like.

The draft plan will be presented to the public for its feedback in February, and district towns will vote on it by Australian ballot on May 24.

The single district will include Albany, Brownington…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Wheelock and Dartmouth connection explained

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Noah Manning welcomes Dartmouth College President Philip Hanlon to Miller’s Run School in Sheffield.  Jill (Tune) Faulkner (back, left), chairman of the Miller’s Run board, and Principal Sikander Rashid (back, right) paused from their work feeding the 50 or so local residents who turned out to meet President Hanlon, and listened to the Miller’s Run graduate speak.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Noah Manning welcomes Dartmouth College President Philip Hanlon to Miller’s Run School in Sheffield. Jill (Tune) Faulkner (back, left), chairman of the Miller’s Run board, and Principal Sikander Rashid (back, right) paused from their work feeding the 50 or so local residents who turned out to meet President Hanlon, and listened to the Miller’s Run graduate speak. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle July 15, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

SHEFFIELD — Noah Manning, a sophomore at Dartmouth College, brought a school friend home recently. He was Philip Hanlon, the president of Dartmouth. His visit to Miller’s Run School, where Mr. Manning got his early education, brought out a crowd for a community meal and a celebration of the link between an Ivy League school and a Northeast Kingdom town.

When Eleazer Wheelock founded Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, in 1769, he had a problem: His plan of educating native Americans and English missionaries was not calculated to bring in a great deal of money. He appealed to the Republic of Vermont for assistance, but aside from expressions of moral support, the Legislature offered little in the way of tangible support during his life.

John Wheelock, Eleazer’s son, became… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Lowell school uses meteorological tower to teach kids

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From left to right, Riley Sanville, Bruce Reagan, Tyler Lucas, and Curtis Bonneau explain how an anemometer, or wind speed sensor, works while their teacher Zarah Savoie holds up their model and their classmates Jeremy Lapan-Ward and Ben Longley look on.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

From left to right, Riley Sanville, Bruce Reagan, Tyler Lucas, and Curtis Bonneau explain how an anemometer, or wind speed sensor, works while their teacher Zarah Savoie holds up their model and their classmates Jeremy Lapan-Ward and Ben Longley look on. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle June 3, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

LOWELL — Sixth-grade students at the Lowell Graded School presented a synopsis of their weather unit Tuesday night.

The unit is special because students used a meteorological tower they have in the schoolyard to learn how to predict the weather from data the tools on the tower provide.

Originally, Green Mountain Power used the tower to measure wind in preparation for the wind project here. The utility donated the tower to the school.….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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contact Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph at [email protected]

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