World War II vet receives a letter from the Queen

Featured

 

Donald Wheatley, formerly of Glover, received best wishes from Queen Elizabeth II for his service in World War II.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Donald Wheatley, formerly of Glover, received best wishes from Queen Elizabeth II for his service in World War II. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 1, 2015

by Tena Starr

NEWPORT — World War II veteran Donald Wheatley, formerly of Glover, received an unusual honor last week. Queen Elizabeth II of England sent him her best wishes and a photograph of herself.

A letter from the Queen’s lady-in-waiting was presented to Mr. Wheatley at Bel-Aire Quality Care Nursing Center in Newport on Wednesday, June 24.

“Donald has a rather illustrious and interesting past that caught Her Majesty’s attention,” said Sharon Campbell of Island Pond.

Ms. Campbell is originally from England…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

World War II veterans gather on the anniversary of D-Day

Featured

 

Joe Queenin of Derby Line holds up a Japanese flag, which was folded inside the helmet of the Japanese soldier he killed during the war.  The flag is covered with wishes for a safe return, hand-written by friends and family of the young soldier.   Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Joe Queenin of Derby Line holds up a Japanese flag, which was folded inside the helmet of the Japanese soldier he killed during the war. The flag is covered with wishes for a safe return, hand-written by friends and family of the young soldier. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle June 10, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

NEWPORT — They came walking upright, leaning on canes, or struggling with walkers, holding in their hands treasured memorabilia from over 70 years ago.  Seventeen World War II veterans — 16 men and one woman, ranging in age from their late eighties through mid-nineties — assembled at the Goodrich Memorial Library in Newport Saturday to mark the anniversary of the allied invasion of Normandy, France.

The event was organized and hosted by Scott Wheeler, owner and editor of Vermont’s Northland Journal, along with his wife, Penny, and daughter Emily. Over 60 people attended, including the veterans, their families, and members of the community.

“I came to mingle with the other vets and remember the occasion,” said 93-year-old Lindy Palin.  “I was reliving a few missions this morning….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

In Orleans: Fenton, 94, gets new medals

Featured

Robert Fenton of Orleans shows off a row of medals reissued to him by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Mr. Fenton earned the medals over his years of service in World War II and the Korean War.  American Legion Post 23 presented him with the replacement medals to Mr. Fenton at Monday’s Memorial Day service in Orleans.   Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Robert Fenton of Orleans shows off a row of medals reissued to him by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Mr. Fenton earned the medals over his years of service in World War II and the Korean War. American Legion Post 23 presented him with the replacement medals to Mr. Fenton at Monday’s Memorial Day service in Orleans. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle May 27, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

ORLEANS — Thirty years ago, Robert Fenton’s military medals went missing. The 94-year-old Mr. Fenton, who is from Orleans, is a veteran of both World War II and the Korean War.

On Monday, at a Memorial Day ceremony in Orleans, American Legion Post #23 presented Mr. Fenton with a duplicate set of medals, reissued by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

“I’m going to put ’em in the bank vault this time,” Mr. Fenton said happily a few minutes after the row of medals was pinned to his chest.

The medals were a U.S. Army Good Conduct Medal, a….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

Wheatley remembers World War II

Featured

 

Donald Wheatley served in the Army during World War II.  Here he poses with a picture of his outfit during the war, of which he is the last living member. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Donald Wheatley served in the Army during World War II. Here he poses with a picture of his outfit during the war, of which he is the last living member. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle May 20, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT — At 93, Donald Wheatley has witnessed most of the major events of the twentieth century, and participated in a big one, World War II.

“I’m 93 years young,” he said in an interview Friday. “I say that seriously. I’m only 93.”

His sister is 96 and still drives, and his father’s mind stayed sharp until he died at 106, Mr. Wheatley said.

None of the members of Mr. Wheatley’s Army outfit were casualties of war, but 70 years after the end of World War II, he is the last surviving member of his company.

“They say 1,000 World War II veterans die every day,” he said.…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

World War II friends reunite after 45 years

Featured

Left to right are Seymour Leven, a female acquaintance, and Addison Merrick.  This photo was taken in Texas in 1945.

Left to right are Seymour Leven, a female acquaintance, and Addison Merrick. This photo was taken in Texas in 1945.

copyright the Chronicle September 3, 2014

by Bethany M. Dunbar

Addison Merrick of Craftsbury and Seymour Leven of Cavendish met in Peyote, Texas, in late 1944 or the very beginning of 1945.  They were in the U.S. Army Air Corps getting ready to be shipped out to the Mariana Islands in the South Pacific during World War II.

Dr. Leven, who later became a psychiatrist, remembers it well.  He walked into a Quonset hut where a bunch of the men had already chosen bunks. He looked around.

“The only one who was reading was him,” said Dr. Leven.

Continue reading

Share

In Glover: What you never knew about the toothbrush

Featured

Clare Dolan, the guiding intelligence of the Museum of Everyday Life, stands outside of her young institution alongside a giant toothbrush built by Newark artist Martin McGowan.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Clare Dolan, the guiding intelligence of the Museum of Everyday Life, stands outside of her young institution alongside a giant toothbrush built by Newark artist Martin McGowan. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 25, 2014

by Joseph Gresser

GLOVER — The word “everyday” means usual or common. It might seem, then, that the Museum of Everyday Life would be a humdrum collection of boring objects. The selection of themes covered in the museum’s four-year history — matches, safety pins, pencils, and, now, toothbrushes — might do nothing to change that view.

A visit to the museum, though, quickly upends any such preconception. Curator Clare Dolan has filled an old dairy barn with a collection of exhibits that uses dental hygiene alone as a lens through which to view the world.

Continue reading

Share

Surviving the Bataan Death March: one POW’s story

Featured

Karen Zale holds a photograph of her father, John Zale (born John Zubrzycki).  Ms. Zale recently participated in the Bataan Memorial Death March in New Mexico in honor of her father, who was a prisoner of war in World War II.  Photos courtesy of Karen Zale

Karen Zale holds a photograph of her father, John Zale (born John Zubrzycki). Ms. Zale recently participated in the Bataan Memorial Death March in New Mexico in honor of her father, who was a prisoner of war in World War II. Photos courtesy of Karen Zale

copyright the Chronicle April 2, 2014 

by Tena Starr

Karen Zale of Newport grew up knowing that her father, John Zale (born John Zubrzyck), was a veteran of World War II.  What she didn’t know, until very late in his life, was that he was a survivor of the Bataan Death March, one of the more horrific events of the war and considered a Japanese war crime by an Allied military commission.

On April 9, 1942, more than 70,000 American and Filipino soldiers, who surrendered to the Japanese at Bataan in the Philippines, were marched roughly 75 miles with little or no food or water.  Many were already wounded, malnourished, and sick, and hundreds died, either from illness, exhaustion, brutality, or outright slaying.

Continue reading

Share