In Glover: What you never knew about the toothbrush

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Clare Dolan, the guiding intelligence of the Museum of Everyday Life, stands outside of her young institution alongside a giant toothbrush built by Newark artist Martin McGowan.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Clare Dolan, the guiding intelligence of the Museum of Everyday Life, stands outside of her young institution alongside a giant toothbrush built by Newark artist Martin McGowan. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 25, 2014

by Joseph Gresser

GLOVER — The word “everyday” means usual or common. It might seem, then, that the Museum of Everyday Life would be a humdrum collection of boring objects. The selection of themes covered in the museum’s four-year history — matches, safety pins, pencils, and, now, toothbrushes — might do nothing to change that view.

A visit to the museum, though, quickly upends any such preconception. Curator Clare Dolan has filled an old dairy barn with a collection of exhibits that uses dental hygiene alone as a lens through which to view the world.

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Surviving the Bataan Death March: one POW’s story

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Karen Zale holds a photograph of her father, John Zale (born John Zubrzycki).  Ms. Zale recently participated in the Bataan Memorial Death March in New Mexico in honor of her father, who was a prisoner of war in World War II.  Photos courtesy of Karen Zale

Karen Zale holds a photograph of her father, John Zale (born John Zubrzycki). Ms. Zale recently participated in the Bataan Memorial Death March in New Mexico in honor of her father, who was a prisoner of war in World War II. Photos courtesy of Karen Zale

copyright the Chronicle April 2, 2014 

by Tena Starr

Karen Zale of Newport grew up knowing that her father, John Zale (born John Zubrzyck), was a veteran of World War II.  What she didn’t know, until very late in his life, was that he was a survivor of the Bataan Death March, one of the more horrific events of the war and considered a Japanese war crime by an Allied military commission.

On April 9, 1942, more than 70,000 American and Filipino soldiers, who surrendered to the Japanese at Bataan in the Philippines, were marched roughly 75 miles with little or no food or water.  Many were already wounded, malnourished, and sick, and hundreds died, either from illness, exhaustion, brutality, or outright slaying.

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