Brewfest brings in the bucks for cancer patients

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Justin Heller (right) and Tyler Howard (left) cooked for about 400 people on July 11 at Brewfest.  Mr. Howard manned the grill, and Mr. Heller was in charge of smoking meat, a task he started four days before the event.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Justin Heller (right) and Tyler Howard (left) cooked for about 400 people on July 11 at Brewfest. Mr. Howard manned the grill, and Mr. Heller was in charge of smoking meat, a task he started four days before the event. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 15, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT CENTER — Brewfest, a fund-raiser held Saturday for cancer patients, brought in about $12,000, said Dr. Leslie Lockridge of the Northeast Kingdom Hematology Oncology Clinic (NEKHO).

Sunshine, beer, barbecue, and music were the order of the day at Kingdom Brewing, where the event was held.

NEKHO staff and patients organized the Brewfest, which was aimed at raising money to fill the clinic’s patient fund once more.

Dr. Lockridge, who owns the clinic, said the money raised would have lasted a couple of years before, but now the number of patients has increased exponentially.

“I’ve been through six months of treatment, and you need an arsenal of things,” Mary Lee Daigle said. “Your whole system is turned upside down.”

Insurance doesn’t begin to cover all the costs a cancer patient can incur.… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Are hops making a comeback in Vermont?

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Local hops cones growing at Parker Pie in West Glover.  Photos by Aaron Dentel-Post

Local hops cones growing at Parker Pie in West Glover. Photos by Aaron Dentel-Post

copyright the Chronicle October 22, 2014

by Aaron Dentel-Post

In 1850, Vermont grew 8.2 percent of the nation’s hops, with Orleans County accounting for 77,605 pounds of the crop a year. The crop was so important that children were taken out of school at harvest time, and men took time off from their regular jobs.

But it was the women, according to Kurt Staudter, executive director of the Vermont Brewers Association and author of Vermont Beer, who were paid the most because they were gentler when picking the easily bruised cones of the plant.

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Beer book serves up history, profiles, tales

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web beer bookcopyright the Chronicle July 30, 2014

by Bethany M. Dunbar

Vermont Beer; History of a Brewing Revolution; by Kurt Staudter and Adam Krakowski, published by the History Press, Charleston, South Carolina, 2014, paperback, 190 pages, $19.99.

Since 1991, Vermont has had more breweries per capita than any state in the nation. But for 100 years, until the Vermont Pub and Brewery and Catamount Brewing Company went into business in 1989, the state had no legal breweries.

The state’s earlier past was quite spirited, with an estimated 125 to 200 active distilleries in 1810.

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