Poetry by a woman with a connection to the land

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WEB shipley review colorcopyright the Chronicle December 9, 2015

The Academy of Hay, by Julia Shipley. Paperback. 75 pages. Published by Bona Fide Books, 2015. $1

Reviewed by Paul Lefebvre

There are poems in Julia Shipley’s recent collection, The Academy of Hay, that remind me of the flat stones I used to search for as a child while spending a summer at my aunt’s cottage on the lake. Some had just the right curves where it was difficult to tell where one side of the stone ended and the other began. They were the best stones to skip across the water’s surface, achieving at times six or seven skips a throw.

And then there were the stones that were too flat, too smooth to throw. Fewer in number, they were the stones I pocketed and kept so I could caress them, or rub them along my forehead on those days when the weather was too disagreeable, or I played games with… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Matt Dunne talks about challenges and opportunities

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Matt Dunne, a Democratic candidate for governor, held a community forum at Parker Pie in West Glover on Sunday afternoon.  The lists of challenges and opportunities generated at the brainstorming session will become part of Mr. Dunne’s campaign platform.  Jill Michaels, left, is the volunteer coordinator for the Dunne campaign.   Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Matt Dunne, a Democratic candidate for governor, held a community forum at Parker Pie in West Glover on Sunday afternoon. The lists of challenges and opportunities generated at the brainstorming session will become part of Mr. Dunne’s campaign platform. Jill Michaels, left, is the volunteer coordinator for the Dunne campaign. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle September 16, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

WEST GLOVER — Democratic gubernatorial candidate Matt Dunne came to the Parker Pie restaurant here Sunday to listen to what people think are the biggest challenges — and opportunities — facing Vermont.  Mr. Dunne wants to hold at least one community forum in every county in Vermont to help plan his campaign platform.

Over slices of what Mr. Dunne called “the best pizza in Vermont,” 13 people from Orleans County brainstormed ideas for the state’s future. Mr. Dunne plans to e-mail a copy of the lists the group generated back to everyone who came to the meeting. He will also compare his notes from all over the state, looking for common threads that will become the core of his platform. He hopes to become aware of issues that are unique to one area or another, he said, so that he can serve those constituents better.

Mr. Dunne, who lives in Hartland, is… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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A new spin on take-out

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Crispy catfish and freekeh with corn-cherry tomato sauté and marjoram. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph.

Crispy catfish and freekeh with corn-cherry tomato sauté and marjoram. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph.

copyright the Chronicle September 16, 2015

By Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

I recently discovered that the New York Times won’t deliver the newspaper to West Glover, where I live. A co-worker told me last week that Internet isn’t available where she lives.

When I first moved here I had to come to grips with the fact that I would have to pick up my pizza rather than having it delivered to my doorstep.

Rural areas are often overlooked when it comes to services, either because the demand isn’t high enough or logistics are too complicated. But Blue Apron isn’t one of those services. At least, not for West Glover.

My roommate signed up for it a while ago. Every week, he receives a cardboard… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Suspended Worlds — an excavation of long ago community life

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Suspended Worlds — an excavation of long ago community life, a book by Christine Hadsel.

Suspended Worlds — an excavation of long ago community life, a book by Christine Hadsel.

copyright the Chronicle September 16, 2015

Suspended Worlds: Historic Theater Scenery in Northern New England, by Christine Hadsel.  Published by David R. Godine, Boston, 2015; 188 pages, hardbound, $40.00.

reviewed by Joseph Gresser

With Suspended Worlds Christine Hadsel has created a coffee table book that belongs in the library of every Vermonter.  As a record of the work of Curtains Without Borders, the organization, it gives a clear account of an imaginative partnership that has, so far, saved 185 theater curtains from neglect.

Both her project and the book serve a deeper purpose in excavating a part of New England community life that has been largely forgotten as times and styles changed over 100 years.

In so doing Ms. Hadsel and her many collaborators have revealed an important part of the region’s artistic heritage that in… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Sidelined train cars have neighbours worried

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One of the hundreds of propane tank cars stored on a railroad siding south of Barton.  Although railroad officials said the cars are secure, this car has been spray-painted by local graffiti artists.  The sign in the foreground marks the location of the Portland crude oil pipeline.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

One of the hundreds of propane tank cars stored on a railroad siding south of Barton. Although railroad officials said the cars are secure, this car has been spray-painted by local graffiti artists. The sign in the foreground marks the location of the Portland crude oil pipeline. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle September 9, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

BARTON — Five miles south of Barton, a long line of train cars built to carry propane gas sit idle on the railroad siding that runs along Route 5. In places, the siding is surrounded by woods. In other places it runs through wetlands, or past modest houses and trailers. Hundreds of tank cars, stretching in a line over a mile long, appeared in late July or early August, and people are worried.

“I noticed the line of cars when I was driving to Lyndonville with my son to buy some paint,” said Ellen Mass, who owns a summer home in West Glover.

With thoughts of the Lac-Megantic disaster in Quebec a few years ago, Ms. Mass called or e-mailed everyone she could think of who might know why a mile of tank cars suddenly appeared…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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A risky deal, or a path to home ownership?

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The Barton home occupied by Mr. McCausland and Ms. Stenta for nearly two years.  Photo by Tena Starr

The Barton home occupied by Mr. McCausland and Ms. Stenta for nearly two years. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle September 2, 2015

by Tena Starr  

BARTON — Dave McCausland, Sue Stenta, and Ms. Stenta’s three children — the youngest being 17 — are living in tents at Pageant Park campground here on Crystal Lake this summer.

They say it’s not by choice.

“Welcome to crazy land,” Mr. McCausland said on a particularly windy afternoon that threatened to tear their tents apart.

He and Ms. Stenta said they ended up being campers because they had to leave their Barton house after an assistant state fire marshal inspected it and found it was unsafe. The house had no running water, except in the basement, the plumbing wasn’t hooked up, there were exposed wires, and the only heat was an improperly installed woodstove, which they put in themselves.

Also, there are questions about what appeared to be an open sewer line in the backyard.

Because a minor occupied…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Larcher explains life on a small scale dairy in France

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Cheese expert Ivan Larcher inaugurates Sterling College’s new Common House with a lecture on small-scale environmentally conscious dairy farming on August 20.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Cheese expert Ivan Larcher inaugurates Sterling College’s new Common House with a lecture on small-scale environmentally conscious dairy farming on August 20. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle September 2, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

CRAFTSBURY COMMON — A master cheesemaker whose work takes him to every continent but Antarctica finds true happiness on a small farm in central France. It’s not hard to imagine that as the elevator pitch for a Hollywood movie, but for Ivan Larcher it’s just life.

Mr. Larcher told his stories and laid out some of the economic realities of life on his small farm in a short talk sponsored by Sterling College in its new Common House — formerly ArtHouse — on Thursday, August 20.

After graduating from an elite French college for dairy professionals, Mr. Larcher was hired by a global company and sent to Japan to advise its sales staff as it sold starter cultures to cheesemakers. His territory — northeastern Asia — included Korea and China, as well as Japan.

Within a year, Mr. Larcher said, he realized the job was not for him.

“I was recommending the best starters for…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Bacon pleads innocent in Greensboro killing

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Ryan Bacon (left) and his lawyer, Jon Valsangiacomo, in Orleans Superior Court shortly after Mr. Bacon pled innocent to a first-degree murder charge in the shooting death of his grandfather Lou-Ron Schneider.  Police say Mr. Bacon shot Mr. Schneider Sunday after a quarrel over his grandfather’s relationship with his mother.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Ryan Bacon (left) and his lawyer, Jon Valsangiacomo, in Orleans Superior Court shortly after Mr. Bacon pled innocent to a first-degree murder charge in the shooting death of his grandfather Lou-Ron Schneider. Police say Mr. Bacon shot Mr. Schneider Sunday after a quarrel over his grandfather’s relationship with his mother. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle August 26, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — The man who allegedly shot and killed Lou-Ron Schneider of Greensboro Sunday pled innocent to a first degree murder charge Tuesday and was ordered held without bail.

Police say Mr. Schneider was the shooter’s grandfather, and the two had a dispute about Mr. Schneider’s relationship with his mother.

According to a police press release, after a roughly 24-hour manhunt, Ryan P. Bacon, 30, of Point Pleasant, New Jersey, turned himself in at the Hardwick police station Monday evening and was taken to the Northeast Regional Correctional Facility.

He made a brief appearance in the Criminal Division of Orleans County Superior Court the next morning where his lawyer, Jon Valsangiacomo, entered the innocent plea and reserved the right to argue that Mr. Bacon should be released on bail while awaiting trial.

Judge Timothy Tomasi said the presumption in cases carrying the possibility of a life…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Holding on to the summer

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A glass of mote con huesillo graces a garden on a warm summer morning.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

A glass of mote con huesillo graces a garden on a warm summer morning. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle August 26, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

When it comes to summer I have always been a pessimist. As a child I looked forward to the Fourth of July, but considered the summer over the next day. That was, mind you, in a place where basil keeps growing into October.

Here my pessimism passes for realism. Summer is short and every warm day is precious.

Over the years I have come to realize that I don’t measure time in the summer by the calendar, but instead by where we are on the continuum of summer fruits.

The earliest days of clement weather are marked for me by the emergence of rhubarb stalks, followed, never quickly enough, by strawberries.

After strawberries come blueberries, black currents, then raspberries. Although we are a…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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West Glover high drive collapses

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Pictured here next to the remains of the high drive roof on the left is the Coe family.  James Coe and Nella Cargioli Coe are in the back, and their children Isabella Coe (left) and Jude Coe (right) are in the front.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Pictured here next to the remains of the high drive roof on the left is the Coe family. James Coe and Nella Cargioli Coe are in the back, and their children Isabella Coe (left) and Jude Coe (right) are in the front. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle August 26, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

WEST GLOVER — The old high drive at the Andersonville Farm here collapsed on Thursday, August 13, after an employee drove under it in a “silage dump truck with its tailgate up,” operational owner James Coe said.

“It’s supposed to go down on its own,” he said about the stuck tailgate.

No one was injured in the accident.

“I didn’t know what to think,” said Dennis Poginy, another employee.

He assumed that wind had blown the already weak structure over.

“That’s what you get for leaving the farm,” Mr. Coe said, laughing.

He was at Parker Pie in West Glover with his wife, Nella Cargioli Coe, when the accident happened. They had just celebrated their wedding anniversary the day before.

They’ve been the operating owners since…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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