Glover residents unhappy about sewer blowout

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copyright the Chronicle August 16, 2017

 

by Elizabeth Trail

 

DATELINE — Several Glover residents attended the August 10 select board meeting here to talk about an attempt last week to blow out the village sewer lines that went wrong.

In Doug Safford’s house, one of the three most seriously affected in the incident, raw sewage rose up out of the toilets even as he stood on the street talking to Selectman Jack Sumberg.

“We heard the gurgling in the lines, and I saw the tanker truck out on the street,” Mr. Safford said. “I went out to see what was happening.”

Mr. Safford said he got short shrift from the equipment operator from Hartigan Wastewater Services of Middlesex.

“He just ignored me and kept doing what he was doing,” Mr. Safford said. “Jack apologized but no one stopped to see what was going on. And when I got back to the house, Cheri was screaming and stuff was bubbling out of the toilet.”

The Glover Select Board hired Hartigan to clear out an obstruction in the sewer line.

Hartigan offers what it calls “vactor” service, a specially equipped truck able to blow out rocks, gravel, and other obstructions lodged inside underground sewer lines.

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Sewage explodes from Glover toilets

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copyright the Chronicle August 9, 2017

by Elizabeth Trail

 

GLOVER — Kate Butler came home from a hard day of work on Monday and was mystified to find her bathroom walls, towels, and counters soaked with water.

“It was really smelly,” she said. “Wet everywhere.”

It tuned out that an attempt to clear out a clogged sewer line in Glover Village early in the afternoon had backfired, leaving several residents with water — or worse — in their bath and laundry rooms.

In Theresa Perron’s house, raw sewage spewed out of the toilet, coating towels, walls, toothbrushes, and the shower curtain, Ms. Perron’s niece Hannah Cole said.

“Projectile poop,” Ms. Cole called it.

The brown wave surged into Ms. Perron’s brand new washing machine. It shot up out of the pipe that the drain goes into, coating both washer and dryer.

“We literally had poop stains on the ceiling,” Ms. Cole said.

“We were cleaning out the lines with pressure,” Glover Selectman Jack Sumberg said. “As an unforeseen consequence, it blew back into some people’s houses.”

Ms. Cole and Ms. Perron had quite a cleaning job.

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Glover voters approve bond for new garage

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copyright the Chronicle April 12, 2017

by Elizabeth Trail

 

GLOVER — By a narrow margin, voters here directed the select board Tuesday to borrow up to $750,000 to pay for a new town garage. The garage will be built on the site of the recycling shed next to the present town garage on Route 16.

The tally was 73 in favor and 68 against.

Of the town’s 776 voters, 141 turned out to cast their ballots, including 25 who voted by absentee ballot ahead of time, and another 27 who voted by absentee ballot on Monday night at an informational meeting at the town hall.

About 40 people showed up for Monday night’s meeting in addition to the three selectmen and other town officials.

Passumpsic Bank has offered the town a fixed rate, 20-year loan at 3 percent interest, Selectman Jack Sumberg said.

Seven hundred fifty thousand dollars would be the most that the town would borrow. That works out to about $30 more taxes a year on a $100,000 property.

No grants are available to cover the cost of a new garage.

“If we’re going to do it, we have to pay for it,” Mr. Sumberg said.

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ATVs — pest or new economic driver?

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copyright the Chronicle March 22, 2017

 

by Tena Starr

 

When a group of ATV enthusiasts went before the Westmore Select board recently to ask that some town roads be opened to them, they touted the usual arguments, the main one being that allowing people who love to ride on the versatile machines to get to stores and restaurants would be good for the economy.

And they received the usual arguments for the select board’s hesitation, the main ones being the town is worried about rogue riders and liability if something happens.

“They’re hoping to get some roads open so they can connect to Brownington roads, which are all open,” said Selectman Bill Perkins. They would also like to have access to amenities, he added.

As of Sunday, the board hadn’t made a decision, though Mr. Perkins, at least, wasn’t inclined to offer much resistance.

“Our main concerns are the same as with snowmobiling,” he said. “We just want to make sure the town isn’t going to be held liable for anything if there’s ever an accident. We don’t want the town responsible in any way. Other than that we don’t see a big problem with them.”

The Westmore request is only one of the latest in a growing debate about whether ATVs — which some think may replace snowmobiles as a major economic engine driving Vermont’s outdoor economy — should be provided more access to town and village roads.

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Glover parents question Halloween ban

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copyright the Chronicle October 12, 2016

by Elizabeth Trail

GLOVER — The October lunch menu at the Glover Community School said that Halloween lunch would be spider bellies, spider legs, and bones.

A day later the school sent a corrected menu home with students. This time, lunch on October 31 was scheduled to be chicken tenders, french fries, and celery sticks.

Then parents learned that the school’s traditional pumpkin carving contest had been canceled.

And students won’t be allowed to wear costumes to school.

“We need to keep religious celebrations and holidays out of schools,” said Angelique Brown, the new Glover principal.

Before coming to Glover, Ms. Brown was assistant principal at a school in Groveton, New Hampshire.

That school eliminated in-school holiday celebrations at least five years ago, she said. And most other areas don’t allow them.

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Is there too much syrup?

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copyright the Chronicle May 18, 2016

by Tena Starr

It’s been a banner year for maple syrup – by many accounts the best in the history of the business.

For many sugarmakers that means it’s also a profitable year.  Although the price of bulk syrup is down somewhat, nearly everyone has more syrup to sell than they did last year.

But others, particularly those who are new to the industry, may be struggling to find a buyer for their bulk syrup.  What some have called a glut of syrup also raises the question of whether maple production is outpacing its market, even though that market is growing.

“A lot of syrup has been produced this year, and a lot of the big packers have got what they need,” said Denise Marshall at D&D Sugarwoods Farm in Glover last week.  “Therefore, lots of sugarmakers don’t have a place to sell their syrup this year because there’s so much of it.”

Ms. Marshall buys a couple hundred drums of syrup each year for use at her own business.  She buys more from local customers to resell to Butternut Mountain Farm in Morrisville, a much bigger packer than she is, and a couple others.

She said she finds herself in a tough spot because she’s had the same customers for years and wants to be loyal to them.  But this season she’s been unable to buy all their syrup, because she has no market for it, at least right now, and she’s not quite sure…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Rodgers considers a run for lieutenant governor

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copyright the Chronicle March 16, 2016

by Tena Starr

GLOVER – State Senator John Rodgers of Glover is considering a bid for lieutenant governor.  If he decides to run, Senator Rodgers will face fellow Democrats Kesha Ram, David Zuckerman, both of Chittenden County, and Brandon RIker of Marlboro in the August Primary Election.  Republican Randy Brock is also running.

Mr. Rodgers was a four-term incumbent when he lost his House seat in 2010 to Sam Young of West Glover by one vote.  He was elected to the state Senate in 2012 and 2014, representing the sprawling Essex-Orleans district with fellow Democrat Bobby Starr from North Troy.  Mr. Rodgers is up for re-election again this year.

He said Monday that he can run for lieutenant governor in the Primary Election without relinquishing his Senate seat.

A main reason for pondering a run is that “I don’t really care for any of the other candidates…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Glover Talent Show and Pie Auction March 19

 

The Glover Public Library invites the public to another March talent show and pie auction on Saturday, March 19, at 7 p.m., at the Glover Town Hall.

Escape the winter doldrums and enjoy an evening of fun and entertainment by local stars. During the show, people may bid on pies and other amazing baked goodies courtesy of talented local bakers. All money raised will benefit the Glover Public Library.

For more information, call the library at 525-4356. — from the Glover Public Library.

For more things to do, see our events page.

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Glover woman qualifies to compete in Olympic trials

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Leah Frost stands before a few of the many race bibs that decorate a wall of her Glover apartment.  Photos by Joseph Gresser

Leah Frost stands before a few of the many race bibs that decorate a wall of her Glover apartment. Photos by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle December 16, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

GLOVER — Leah Frost, who won the title of “Fastest Woman in Glover” at the 2013 and 2014 Glover Day Chamberlain Run, has earned the chance to match her mettle against some of her running heroes. A time of 2:42:52 in the California International Marathon means she has qualified to compete in trials for a slot on the U.S. Women’s Olympic Team.

The race was held in Sacramento, California, on December 6.

Ms. Frost, who lives in Glover, said Monday that she is under no illusion that she will be one of those chosen to represent the U.S. in the 2016 Olympic Games to be held in Rio De Janeiro next August. To do that, she said, would require her to cut around 20 minutes from her time.

If the weather stays as it has been and she’s able to train hard, Ms. Frost said she… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Glover vet gets a new home

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Dale Kilby of Glover plans to donate to the Disabled Veterans of the America in order to “pay it forward.”  Photo by Tena Starr

Dale Kilby of Glover plans to donate to the Disabled Veterans of the America in order to “pay it forward.” Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle November 25, 2015

by Tena Starr

GLOVER — Dale Kilby is a Vietnam vet who grew up on a West Glover farm. He’s spent the past 20 years living in a tiny silver camper in the woods a few miles south of Glover Village.

He works two days a week at the Glover recycling center, and he walks, or hitchhikes, wherever he needs to go. Since his home has no running water or electricity, that means hauling in everything he needs, including water, on foot. And since he rents the land, it wouldn’t make sense to drill a well, even if he could afford such an extravagance.

Some time ago, his decrepit trailer’s roof began to leak. He put up with it, but had a particularly tough winter last year. It was bitter, and the interior of the trailer could… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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