State approves consolidation plan for OCSU

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copyright the Chronicle April 20, 2016

by Elizabeth Trail

BARTON — The State Board of Education on Tuesday unanimously approved the Orleans Central Supervisory Union’s (OCSU) plan for a consolidated school district.

Meanwhile the committee that has been working on that plan is holding informational meetings in the OCSU towns that will vote on consolidation in June.

Only three members of the public showed up at the meeting at the Barton Graded School on Saturday norming.

The meeting covered the articles of agreement that the state had to approve before the school district merger vote on June 7.

“You should have more people here,” said Grace Mason, a resident of Barton and former town clerk. “I made it clear to all my friends that they should come to this meeting, but as you can see, they didn’t.”

“There is a lot of misinformation out there,” said Amy Leroux…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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At NCUHS: Berrios offered job as principal

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copyright the Chronicle April 13, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT – Members of the North Country Union High School Board met Monday and interviewed the two finalists hoping to succeed Bill Rivard as the school’s principal.  Mr. Rivard will leave the school after 14 years on the job.

North Country Supervisory Union Superintendent John Castle said Tuesday evening that the board decided to offer the position to Andrew Berrios, who is currently interim principal at Smith Academy.…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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In Holland: Meeting set to discuss failed school budget

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copyright the Chronicle March 9, 2016

by Tena Starr

HOLLAND – The school board here plans to hold a public meeting on Monday, March 14, at 6 p.m.  Board members hope that Holland’s voters will tell them how to move forward in the wake of last week’s budget defeat, or at least why they voted the way they did.

The budget, which is voted on by Australian ballot, was rejected 94-79 despite the fact that it had been cut by about $80,000 from the previous year.

At the same time, Holland voters approved their share of the North Country Union High School and junior high school budgets.

The town school budget was down for the second year in a row, but because of…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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No plans to consolidate at NCSU

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copyright the Chronicle February 3, 2016

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

While the Orleans Central Supervisory Union (OCSU) prepares to go ahead with consolidation under Act 46, North Country Supervisory Union (NCSU) Superintendent John Castle is against the idea.

The NCSU hasn’t moved towards consolidating at all, he said.  Instead, it will have what the law calls an alternative structure, where it will remain a supervisory union and its districts will keep their own school boards.

“I advocated strongly against the adoption of the law,” Mr. Castle said.  “I’ve had real concerns…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Community mourns Creative Minds closure

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copyright the Chronicle February 3, 2016

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT – Shortcomings in both early childhood education policy and funding have made it impossible for Creative Minds Children’s Center in Newport Center to stay open, founder and owner Jody Marquis told the community Monday night at a meeting at the North Country Career Center.

The Newport Center childcare provider will close its doors on February 26, following several years of struggling to make ends meet.  Nearly 50 children were attending when the decision to close was made.

“It’s a very emotional day…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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OCSU committee approves plan for consolidation

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copyright the Chronicle January 27, 2016

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

The Orleans Central Supervisory Union (OCSU) Act 46 study committee is recommending early consolidation in order to take advantage of the tax breaks it offers.

On Tuesday, the committee approved articles of agreement that spell out what a consolidated district, the Orleans Central Unified Union School District, will look like.

The draft plan will be presented to the public for its feedback in February, and district towns will vote on it by Australian ballot on May 24.

The single district will include Albany, Brownington…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Wheelock and Dartmouth connection explained

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Noah Manning welcomes Dartmouth College President Philip Hanlon to Miller’s Run School in Sheffield.  Jill (Tune) Faulkner (back, left), chairman of the Miller’s Run board, and Principal Sikander Rashid (back, right) paused from their work feeding the 50 or so local residents who turned out to meet President Hanlon, and listened to the Miller’s Run graduate speak.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Noah Manning welcomes Dartmouth College President Philip Hanlon to Miller’s Run School in Sheffield. Jill (Tune) Faulkner (back, left), chairman of the Miller’s Run board, and Principal Sikander Rashid (back, right) paused from their work feeding the 50 or so local residents who turned out to meet President Hanlon, and listened to the Miller’s Run graduate speak. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle July 15, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

SHEFFIELD — Noah Manning, a sophomore at Dartmouth College, brought a school friend home recently. He was Philip Hanlon, the president of Dartmouth. His visit to Miller’s Run School, where Mr. Manning got his early education, brought out a crowd for a community meal and a celebration of the link between an Ivy League school and a Northeast Kingdom town.

When Eleazer Wheelock founded Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, in 1769, he had a problem: His plan of educating native Americans and English missionaries was not calculated to bring in a great deal of money. He appealed to the Republic of Vermont for assistance, but aside from expressions of moral support, the Legislature offered little in the way of tangible support during his life.

John Wheelock, Eleazer’s son, became… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Lowell school uses meteorological tower to teach kids

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From left to right, Riley Sanville, Bruce Reagan, Tyler Lucas, and Curtis Bonneau explain how an anemometer, or wind speed sensor, works while their teacher Zarah Savoie holds up their model and their classmates Jeremy Lapan-Ward and Ben Longley look on.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

From left to right, Riley Sanville, Bruce Reagan, Tyler Lucas, and Curtis Bonneau explain how an anemometer, or wind speed sensor, works while their teacher Zarah Savoie holds up their model and their classmates Jeremy Lapan-Ward and Ben Longley look on. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle June 3, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

LOWELL — Sixth-grade students at the Lowell Graded School presented a synopsis of their weather unit Tuesday night.

The unit is special because students used a meteorological tower they have in the schoolyard to learn how to predict the weather from data the tools on the tower provide.

Originally, Green Mountain Power used the tower to measure wind in preparation for the wind project here. The utility donated the tower to the school.….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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contact Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph at [email protected]

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At Lake Region: Madame Rivard to leave the classroom

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Sally Rivard, or Madame, as her students call her, is leaving the classroom after 30 years of teaching French at Lake Region Union High School.  She will coach other teachers and help them self-reflect on their own teaching practices.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Sally Rivard, or Madame, as her students call her, is leaving the classroom after 30 years of teaching French at Lake Region Union High School. She will coach other teachers and help them self-reflect on their own teaching practices. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle March 25, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

When you enter classroom 213 at Lake Region Union High School, you’ll find it filled with French-related paraphernalia. Canadian, French, and Haitian flags are suspended from the ceiling, and a bilingual “unload at top only” plaque hangs on the back wall above travel posters.

“I got that one from Jay Peak,” said Sally Rivard, who has been Lake Region’s French teacher for the past 30-odd years.

This is her last year of teaching French at Lake Region. Her blue eyes sparkle and her blond, jaw-length hair swishes as she talks about her students’ curriculum, which she is obviously passionate about.

Her infectious grin makes it easy to see how she made a lasting impression on the people she worked with over the years and the students she taught.

Principal Andre Messier was a senior when Ms. Rivard, or “Madame,” as her students call her, first taught at Lake Region.

“He was only sent to the office once,” she said of her former pupil. She also said he was a good student.

“She was always dynamic and full of energy,” Mr. Messier said. “Both of my kids had the benefit of it.”

That energy explains the huge variety of activities and subjects Madame included in her curriculums.

For every quarter, students study a song, a book, a movie and have both a listening project and a cooking project.

“Oh, there’s the escargot,” Mr. Messier said when describing the types of sounds and smells that might waft down from the second floor where Madame teaches.

Her own French teacher, who died last year, inspired her.

“She approached the classroom with a sense of play,” Madame said. “That’s cool. I sort of try to honor her by doing that.”

When Ms. Rivard first moved to Barton 30 years ago, the area resembled her own hometown of Deerfield, Massachusetts, she said.

“There wasn’t any diversity,” she said.

She decided to give kids an idea of other cultures. Together they explored stereotypes and backed away from them to ask “why” and “what does that say about people?”

“I think my role is to cause other people to think about stuff,” she said. “Humanity is the common denominator.”

Mr. Messier said she has children speak, hear, and read the language through culture.

There are two types of culture, Ms. Rivard said, little “c” which includes day-to-day life and habits, and big “C,” which encompasses history, art, dance, and music.

“There’s always food,” she said, referring to techniques that get students involved. “That usually does it.”

In the French culture unit this year, students tried escargot, or snails, for the first time. Half the class loved it, some hated it and the rest felt indifferent, Ms. Rivard said.

“They’re willing to try something new and different.”

Level four students worked on the Renaissance period in France, cooking raspberry and nutella-flavored macaroons, which were created in the renaissance.

Next up, chocolate, which was imported during the Enlightenment period and was all the rage at the French court.

By picking topics that are likely to interest the kids but still have historical or cultural importance, Ms. Rivard gets the students to think backwards and make connections.

One student was interested in hunting and decided to compare practices in the United States to practices in France, discovering that people don’t hunt as much there.

Ms. Rivard said that according to the student’s research, one possible reason for that was connected to history.

“Hunting was traditionally for nobles and kings,” she said.

With restrictions on hunting land, peasants simply couldn’t hunt and the practice didn’t develop the way it did here, she said.

Some of her cultural teachings hit even closer to home, going into the students’ own cultural roots by learning how to pronounce Canadian French or Québécois using a book called Québécois for Dummies and online tutorials.

The students’ own grandparents’ accent and Québec’s media outlets made the teachings more relevant.

The people at Lake Region taught her some things about French too, Quebecois French.

“We joked about creating a dictionary of Québécois words versus Parisian words,” Mr. Messier said.

Despite her French name, Madame’s background is English.

“I can’t be a French teacher with the name Filkins,” she said, joking that she married her husband for his French name.

The French curriculum is both local and global, covering cultures from around the world that speak French.

In a unit about Haiti, students read a book about a day in the life of a Haitian child. The book was written in Creole, French and English side by side, which allowed students to see the differences and similarities between the languages, Ms. Rivard said.

They discussed political turmoil, resilience, what people value and why they go to extremes. They went into a civics discussion asking how to help raise the standard of living and whether or not it’s their place to do so.

“She has kids experience the language,” said Mr. Messier. “It’s not just textbooks.”

In fact Ms. Rivard has made sure her teachings reached further than the classroom and affected more people than just her own students.

The higher French levels did a research and community project of their choice, but the project had to have a long-lasting impact for the community, she said.

One student who loved ballet and recognized the French names of ballet positions decided to make a YouTube video explaining the positions and their names as a teaching tool for an after school class.

“That’s longevity,” Ms. Rivard said.

Lake Region welcomed kids from France on Wednesday, March 25, for a two-week visit. Ms. Rivard had to find homes for 19 kids and two chaperones.

It’s the first time Lake Region has welcomed a class from abroad during the school year, she said. The 16- and 17-year-olds will spend a day and a half in school with her students.

“It’s going to be a challenge because English is not their focus,” Ms. Rivard said about the visiting teenagers.

The students are from an agricultural and equestrian school and want to see the flora and fauna of Vermont.

While the upper French classes at Lake Region speak almost entirely in French in class, Ms. Rivard expects some communication difficulty. The goal of speaking mostly French in class is to help students not feel scared to try and speak, and to feel comfortable expressing themselves.

According to Mr. Messier, Ms. Rivard’s influence is also felt in other departments, like the Spanish department.

Ms. Rivard said she’s been working closely with the Spanish teacher to ensure students are being evaluated similarly in both programs.

Next year she will work even more with other teachers in the school since she is not actually leaving, only moving out of the classroom, she said.

“My role for next year is to be a coach,” she said.

She will observe other teachers’ courses and help them self reflect about their practices in a program tentatively called Mutually Exploring Teaching And Learning (METAL).

“I’m glad that I’ll be able to work here part-time because it would be like tearing out a part of my soul if I leave here cold turkey,” she said. “It’s been great fun. I would never have swapped this job for anything.”

contact Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph at [email protected]

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Keep small schools, school directors say

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Bobby Starr.  Photo by Micaela Bedell

Bobby Starr. Photo by Micaela Bedell

copyright the Chronicle March 18, 2015 

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — Legislators from the Northeast Kingdom were told in no uncertain terms to oppose Montpelier’s efforts to shut down small schools and consolidate districts.

That stern warning came from school board members from around Orleans County and was delivered Monday night at a gathering held at the North Country Career Center. About 20 legislators and school board members sat around a big table while another 30 or 40 people sat nearby.

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