Bill McKibben speaks at Sterling College

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copyright the Chronicle February 22, 2017

 

by Elizabeth Trail

 

CRAFTSBURY COMMON — “We all want the places we live in to remain unchanged,” writer and environmental activist Bill McKibben told a crowd of about 200 people at a Sterling College open house on Saturday. “But all over the world now, there are people paying enormous prices for our energy use.”

Mr. McKibben was answering a question about large-scale wind development. Behind him through the picture windows at the back of Simpson Hall, his audience could see the college’s new array of solar panels that were being dedicated that day.

Up to 100 million people are expected to die by 2030 as a result of climate change, Mr. McKibben said.

And he said that most of them are poor people in developing countries — people who have done nothing to contribute to the problem.

“Vermonters have a debt to the world, and we should be willing to make sacrifices,” he said.

But Vermont itself is not going to be unscathed by climate change.  Mr. McKibben said that computer models project cross-country skiing and snowmobiling becoming extinct in Vermont by the mid to latter part of this century due to lack of snow. And the forests that are the glory of the state will be sadly changed.

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On Craftsbury Common: Candlelight vigil held for victims of police violence

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Julie Lou Lepping, a student at Sterling College, organized a candlelight vigil Sunday to protest recent police violence in Missouri and New York.  “I felt so angry and confused by the injustices being done to people of color in America,” Ms. Lepping said.  “I felt I had to do something.  How can you not?”   Photo by David Dudley

Julie Lou Lepping, a student at Sterling College, organized a candlelight vigil Sunday to protest recent police violence in Missouri and New York. “I felt so angry and confused by the injustices being done to people of color in America,” Ms. Lepping said. “I felt I had to do something. How can you not?” Photo by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle December 10, 2014

by David Dudley

CRAFTSBURY — Roughly 40 people gathered on Craftsbury Common Sunday night to hold a candlelight vigil in response to police violence against black Americans.

Julia Lou Lepping, a student at Sterling College from Louisville, Kentucky, organized the vigil. As the 40 people, who all carried candles, filled the center of the snow-covered common, they formed a circle.

Though it was dark, and two degrees below zero, a full moon bathed the group in cool light.

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Is the postal service shooting itself in the foot?

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The Post Office in Craftsbury Common has strange hours these days.  Residents say they are inconvenient, but the USPS says decreasing hours is the only way to keep some of these offices open. Photos by David Dudley

The Post Office in Craftsbury Common has strange hours these days. Residents say they are inconvenient, but the USPS says decreasing hours is the only way to keep some of these offices open. Photos by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle October 29, 2014

by David Dudley

In May of 2012 the United States Postal Service (USPS) implemented the Post Plan, which was devised to curb mounting debt, and prevent thousands of offices, many of them rural post offices, such as those in Greensboro Bend, Craftsbury Common, and Albany, from being shut down altogether. The USPS estimated that the plan would be up and running by September of 2014.

For many rural offices in Orleans County, the Post Plan means decreased window hours, which is affecting local businesses that depend on the Postal Service for shipping. Also, many employees have seen their hours cut, and people who work full-time are having trouble getting to the post office while it’s open.

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