Select board races in several towns

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copyright the Chronicle February 3, 2016

There will be contested races for selectmen in Derby and Brighton.  The big news, though, is that the four towns that choose officers by Australian ballot will have candidates for all major offices.

In Barton, which has two open seats on the board of selectmen, Elizabeth McCartney will stand to replace Jim Greenwood, who decided…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Fish passage is officially open

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Photo by Nate Sicard

Photo by Nate Sicard

copyright the Chronicle January 6, 2016

The long-awaited fish passage at Barton Electric’s hydroelectric power plant in West Charleston officially opened on December 23. Federal regulations require a way for fish to be able to migrate upstream past a power plant or dam….

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Barton beauty shop closes after 36 years

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Ione Armstrong’s beauty shop in Barton will close on December 23.  She opened the shop on a shoestring 36 years ago, building the stations in her shop herself out of old kitchen cabinets. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Ione Armstrong’s beauty shop in Barton will close on December 23. She opened the shop on a shoestring 36 years ago, building the stations in her shop herself out of old kitchen cabinets. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle December 16, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

BARTON — A Barton landmark will close for good on December 23.

Ione’s Beauty Shop has been a fixture on Church Street, between the library and what is now Ming’s restaurant, for 36 years. But 75-year-old Ione Armstrong is making plans to retire just before Christmas.

Ms. Armstrong is looking forward to having more time to spend with her longtime partner, Douglas Bowen. The two have lived together for 26 years. And for most of those years she was running not just the shop in Barton, but also a second shop in Albany.

“He wanted me to get done so we’d have more time together. All this time, he’s never complained.”

Born near Ausable Forks, New York,… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Bel-Aire veterans are feted

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Sergeant Major Retired John Wilson (left) had only a few days notice to pull together an event to honor World War Two veterans at the Bel-Aire Quality Care Nursing Center in Newport on Tuesday. With Mr. Wilson, from left to right are Dick Baraw, a Korean-era Army veteran and a former mayor of Newport; Mr. Wilson's daughter Jennifer Wilson; Vietnam veteran Robert Davio; and Francis Ormsbee, who served in the Air Force in Korea. In short speeches, the veterans expressed their gratitude to the ten World War II veterans who stay at Bel-Aire. Miss Wilson's fourth-grade class at St. Paul's School in Barton made cards. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Sergeant Major Retired John Wilson (left) had only a few days notice to pull together an event to honor World War Two veterans at the Bel-Aire Quality Care Nursing Center in Newport on Tuesday. With Mr. Wilson, from left to right are Dick Baraw, a Korean-era Army veteran and a former mayor of Newport; Mr. Wilson’s daughter Jennifer Wilson; Vietnam veteran Robert Davio; and Francis Ormsbee, who served in the Air Force in Korea. In short speeches, the veterans expressed their gratitude to the ten World War II veterans who stay at Bel-Aire. Miss Wilson’s fourth-grade class at St. Paul’s School in Barton made cards. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle November 11, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

NEWPORT — Jennifer Wilson’s fourth-grade class at St. Paul’s School in Barton made 83 cards for area veterans this year to thank them for their service to the country. The project took the children more than two weeks. Most of the cards were mailed last week, but on Tuesday morning, at a special event at the Bel-Aire Quality Care Center in Newport, the children had a chance to meet ten World War II veterans and personally hand them cards.

The occasion was a special ceremony planned to honor the veterans, now in their nineties, by Jennifer Wilson’s father, Sergeant Major Retired John Wilson.

Mr. Wilson, a familiar figure… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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A pre-dawn hay run to Canada

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The workday isn’t over yet for Richard Labrecque, pictured here in front of his loaded truck, which he parked in the Barton Motors parking lot.  After six hours of driving and one hour of loading, he spent the rest of the day working in his sugarbush.

The workday isn’t over yet for Richard Labrecque, pictured here in front of his loaded truck, which he parked in the Barton Motors parking lot. After six hours of driving and one hour of loading, he spent the rest of the day working in his sugarbush.

copyright the Chronicle November 4, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

The sun was nowhere near rising when this reporter met Richard Labrecque of Barton at the Circle K in Barton to go on a hay run to Canada in his Western Star truck and trailer.

“You all set?” he said as he leaned against a friend’s car, sipping his coffee. “Let’s go.”

Mr. Labrecque sells the hay he buys in Canada to farms in Vermont, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and Connecticut.

“It’s good money if you know your French,” he said about the business.

Mr. Labrecque grew up speaking French with his family, and going on 200 hay runs to Canada per year helps him keep it up.

As he drove his big truck onto Interstate 91, headed north, he switched on… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Efficiency, economy, and school funding discussed at Barton Chamber meeting

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Bob Murphy, public events coordinator from Efficiency Vermont, addresses the Barton Area Chamber of Commerce annual meeting at the WilloughVale Inn in Westmore on Thursday night.  Mr. Murphy and project intake coordinator Adam Tower talked about how businesses can take advantage of Efficiency Vermont’s help, from technical advice to incentives or rebates, to improving their energy efficiency and save money.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Bob Murphy, public events coordinator from Efficiency Vermont, addresses the Barton Area Chamber of Commerce annual meeting at the WilloughVale Inn in Westmore on Thursday night. Mr. Murphy and project intake coordinator Adam Tower talked about how businesses can take advantage of Efficiency Vermont’s help, from technical advice to incentives or rebates, to improving their energy efficiency and save money. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle October 28, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

WESTMORE — Bob Murphy of Efficiency Vermont opened his presentation to the Barton Area Chamber of Commerce’s annual gathering by asking how many people in the room used electricity or other fuels in the course of operating their businesses.

Every hand in the room went up.

“How many of you have been in touch with us to find out how you can use less energy and save money?” Mr. Murphy asked.

Three or four hands went up.

“That’s not a matching number of hands,” he said.

Mr. Murphy and his co-worker Adam Tower were the featured speakers at the chamber’s annual dinner, which was held on Thursday, October 22, at the WilloughVale Inn. More than 40 members and guests came to enjoy a buffet style dinner, cash bar, speakers, and… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Barton arts collaborative debates uses of future home

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A pot of chrysanthemums livens the entrance to the future home of the Greater Barton Arts and Artists group.  Enough people have pledged financial support to proceed with buying the old house on Water Street next to the Chronicle building. Photos by Elizabeth Trail

A pot of chrysanthemums livens the entrance to the future home of the Greater Barton Arts and Artists group. Enough people have pledged financial support to proceed with buying the old house on Water Street next to the Chronicle building. Photos by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle October 14, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

BARTON — About 30 people attended an afternoon meeting of the Greater Barton Arts and Artists on Saturday at the dilapidated Water Street house that just may become their new home.

Those who came to the meeting agreed in principle that the century old house and barn would be a good place for an arts center. A few signed up to contribute time and skills to the project, and about 15 made pledges of financial support of $25 to $50 per month — enough to cover a mortgage payment and taxes.

The group’s organizers, Ed and Adrien Helm, have negotiated an option to buy the place from its current owner, James Ballard, for $45,000. The price includes the $21,000 Mr. Ballard spent this summer on a new steel roof, some foundation work, as well as a promise to replace the upstairs ceilings, which were damaged by… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Sidelined train cars have neighbours worried

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One of the hundreds of propane tank cars stored on a railroad siding south of Barton.  Although railroad officials said the cars are secure, this car has been spray-painted by local graffiti artists.  The sign in the foreground marks the location of the Portland crude oil pipeline.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

One of the hundreds of propane tank cars stored on a railroad siding south of Barton. Although railroad officials said the cars are secure, this car has been spray-painted by local graffiti artists. The sign in the foreground marks the location of the Portland crude oil pipeline. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle September 9, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

BARTON — Five miles south of Barton, a long line of train cars built to carry propane gas sit idle on the railroad siding that runs along Route 5. In places, the siding is surrounded by woods. In other places it runs through wetlands, or past modest houses and trailers. Hundreds of tank cars, stretching in a line over a mile long, appeared in late July or early August, and people are worried.

“I noticed the line of cars when I was driving to Lyndonville with my son to buy some paint,” said Ellen Mass, who owns a summer home in West Glover.

With thoughts of the Lac-Megantic disaster in Quebec a few years ago, Ms. Mass called or e-mailed everyone she could think of who might know why a mile of tank cars suddenly appeared…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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A risky deal, or a path to home ownership?

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The Barton home occupied by Mr. McCausland and Ms. Stenta for nearly two years.  Photo by Tena Starr

The Barton home occupied by Mr. McCausland and Ms. Stenta for nearly two years. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle September 2, 2015

by Tena Starr  

BARTON — Dave McCausland, Sue Stenta, and Ms. Stenta’s three children — the youngest being 17 — are living in tents at Pageant Park campground here on Crystal Lake this summer.

They say it’s not by choice.

“Welcome to crazy land,” Mr. McCausland said on a particularly windy afternoon that threatened to tear their tents apart.

He and Ms. Stenta said they ended up being campers because they had to leave their Barton house after an assistant state fire marshal inspected it and found it was unsafe. The house had no running water, except in the basement, the plumbing wasn’t hooked up, there were exposed wires, and the only heat was an improperly installed woodstove, which they put in themselves.

Also, there are questions about what appeared to be an open sewer line in the backyard.

Because a minor occupied…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Orleans County Fair in Barton

Mike Myers reassures his daughter Abigail as the two spin in a teacup on the midway at the Orleans County Fair in 2014.  The family hails from Winooski, but spends summers at their camp in Sheffield.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Mike Myers reassures his daughter Abigail as the two spin in a teacup on the midway at the Orleans County Fair in 2014. The family hails from Winooski, but spends summers at their camp in Sheffield. Photo by Joseph Gresser

The 148th Orleans County Fair will be held Wednesday through Sunday, August 19 through 23, at the Orleans County Fairgrounds in Barton. Rides, animals, horse shows, food vendors, races, demo derby, floral hall vendors, and so much more! Too much information to list! See the ad in this week’s issue. For more information, visit www.orleanscountyfair.net or call (802) 525-3555

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