Students learn flag folding techniques in time for Veterans Day

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St. Paul’s School students learned how to respect and fold the flag on Thursday when members of the American Legion came by.   Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

St. Paul’s School students learned how to respect and fold the flag on Thursday when members of the American Legion came by. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle November 11, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

BARTON — Many eager hands shot into the air when American Legion State Commander Frederick E. LaTour of Barton asked for flag-folding volunteers at St. Paul’s School on Thursday.

St. Paul’s students learned how to properly care for and respect the American flag when members of the American Legion, equipped with flags and a documentary, came to the school and showed the kids how to properly fold a flag.

“It’s important for them to learn how to respect the flags, how to respect the veterans,” said Angie Poginy, who organized the activity.

They kicked off the session with a viewing of the film For Which It Stands about a boy who writes a paper about the flag, and how he came to understand and respect it more.

It starts with an argument between him and his brother, a war veteran and firefighter, who steals his baseball cap when the boy refuses… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Bel-Aire veterans are feted

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Sergeant Major Retired John Wilson (left) had only a few days notice to pull together an event to honor World War Two veterans at the Bel-Aire Quality Care Nursing Center in Newport on Tuesday. With Mr. Wilson, from left to right are Dick Baraw, a Korean-era Army veteran and a former mayor of Newport; Mr. Wilson's daughter Jennifer Wilson; Vietnam veteran Robert Davio; and Francis Ormsbee, who served in the Air Force in Korea. In short speeches, the veterans expressed their gratitude to the ten World War II veterans who stay at Bel-Aire. Miss Wilson's fourth-grade class at St. Paul's School in Barton made cards. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Sergeant Major Retired John Wilson (left) had only a few days notice to pull together an event to honor World War Two veterans at the Bel-Aire Quality Care Nursing Center in Newport on Tuesday. With Mr. Wilson, from left to right are Dick Baraw, a Korean-era Army veteran and a former mayor of Newport; Mr. Wilson’s daughter Jennifer Wilson; Vietnam veteran Robert Davio; and Francis Ormsbee, who served in the Air Force in Korea. In short speeches, the veterans expressed their gratitude to the ten World War II veterans who stay at Bel-Aire. Miss Wilson’s fourth-grade class at St. Paul’s School in Barton made cards. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle November 11, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

NEWPORT — Jennifer Wilson’s fourth-grade class at St. Paul’s School in Barton made 83 cards for area veterans this year to thank them for their service to the country. The project took the children more than two weeks. Most of the cards were mailed last week, but on Tuesday morning, at a special event at the Bel-Aire Quality Care Center in Newport, the children had a chance to meet ten World War II veterans and personally hand them cards.

The occasion was a special ceremony planned to honor the veterans, now in their nineties, by Jennifer Wilson’s father, Sergeant Major Retired John Wilson.

Mr. Wilson, a familiar figure… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Ruminations: Fresh food fatigue — it’s a thing

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Grilled pizza.  Photos by Richard Creaser

Grilled pizza. Photos by Richard Creaser

copyright the Chronicle September 23, 2015

by Richard Creaser

There reaches a point in every growing season where the produce just keeps rolling in. While the quantities are cause for celebration, the variety leaves something to be desired.

By mid-July I’m just about fed up with salad. By the end of August, I’m corned to death. Don’t even get me started on the zucchini.

The problem isn’t so much with the food itself but, rather, the mental fatigue that accompanies trying to come up with a new way to prepare something you’ve been eating non-stop for the last few weeks. Some foods are resistant to change (radish, I’m looking at you), and others are simply so overly abundant that, if you used every recipe from every cookbook and magazine you’ve ever owned, you’d still be faced with ten to 15 pounds more of it than you actually know what to do with.

The type of produce that bores us with its abundance varies greatly from week… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Out of the Darkness walk raises awareness about suicide

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This patchwork quilt, with a suicide victim on each patch, is displayed at every American Foundation for Suicide Prevention event in Newport.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

This patchwork quilt, with a suicide victim on each patch, is displayed at every American Foundation for Suicide Prevention event in Newport. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle September 16, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT — Brendan Donnelly, Gabriel Young, and Shawn Chaput were only a few of the names to be seen on colorful T-shirts worn by many of the 206 participants here Saturday, at the Out of the Darkness walk, which marked the end of National Suicide Prevention Week.

The three of them committed suicide, leaving behind confused and grieving friends and relatives.

Saturday’s event was meant to remember, to provide support for families, and to raise money and awareness about suicide.

Proceeds will go to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP). As of Monday, the event had raised $14,000.

The walk started at the bandstand in… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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A new spin on take-out

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Crispy catfish and freekeh with corn-cherry tomato sauté and marjoram. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph.

Crispy catfish and freekeh with corn-cherry tomato sauté and marjoram. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph.

copyright the Chronicle September 16, 2015

By Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

I recently discovered that the New York Times won’t deliver the newspaper to West Glover, where I live. A co-worker told me last week that Internet isn’t available where she lives.

When I first moved here I had to come to grips with the fact that I would have to pick up my pizza rather than having it delivered to my doorstep.

Rural areas are often overlooked when it comes to services, either because the demand isn’t high enough or logistics are too complicated. But Blue Apron isn’t one of those services. At least, not for West Glover.

My roommate signed up for it a while ago. Every week, he receives a cardboard… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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New restaurant opens in Barton

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Edible Delight Café owners painted the inside of their restaurant with popping colors and decorated with vintage touches like the framed comic book covers lining the wall above the windows here.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Edible Delight Café owners painted the inside of their restaurant with popping colors and decorated with vintage touches like the framed comic book covers lining the wall above the windows here. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle September 9, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

BARTON — The Edible Delight Café opened here on Saturday, August 29. It’s located where the lunch counter used to be in the Pierce Block. Patrons can get breakfast, including pancakes and eggs, and lunch, including burgers, sandwiches, fish and chips, and more.

Owners Michelle and Janét Gatison and Jean Lindor opened the ice cream window earlier this summer while they continued renovations before…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Sheffield Field Day is animated by competition

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Edmond Lehous, left, stands and watches as his horseshoe heads for the stake.  To his right Gilbert Goodrich watches his hopes for a winning game go down the drain.  It wasn’t a new experience for Mr. Goodrich, who said his horseshoe team finished second this year to the one on which Mr. Lehous plays.  Photo by Joseph Gresser.

Edmond Lehous, left, stands and watches as his horseshoe heads for the stake. To his right Gilbert Goodrich watches his hopes for a winning game go down the drain. It wasn’t a new experience for Mr. Goodrich, who said his horseshoe team finished second this year to the one on which Mr. Lehous plays. Photo by Joseph Gresser.

copyright the Chronicle September 9, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

SHEFFIELD — On the surface the Sheffield Field Day is a carefree celebration of Labor Day and a summer’s harvest. Scratch the cheerful surface and you find that a fierce competitive spirit animates the entire event.

Judges scan the parade and award prizes to the best floats. Across the road vegetables are examined, and the finest festooned with ribbons, and on the midway youngsters and their parents test their skill in games of chance that pit sharp darts against tender balloons.

Most years, although sadly not this year, teams of horses contest to see which can pull the heaviest loads. And every year players of every age keep a sharp eye on multiple cards as the bingo caller cries out his numbers.

It seems that only the chicken barbecue…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Larcher explains life on a small scale dairy in France

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Cheese expert Ivan Larcher inaugurates Sterling College’s new Common House with a lecture on small-scale environmentally conscious dairy farming on August 20.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Cheese expert Ivan Larcher inaugurates Sterling College’s new Common House with a lecture on small-scale environmentally conscious dairy farming on August 20. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle September 2, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

CRAFTSBURY COMMON — A master cheesemaker whose work takes him to every continent but Antarctica finds true happiness on a small farm in central France. It’s not hard to imagine that as the elevator pitch for a Hollywood movie, but for Ivan Larcher it’s just life.

Mr. Larcher told his stories and laid out some of the economic realities of life on his small farm in a short talk sponsored by Sterling College in its new Common House — formerly ArtHouse — on Thursday, August 20.

After graduating from an elite French college for dairy professionals, Mr. Larcher was hired by a global company and sent to Japan to advise its sales staff as it sold starter cultures to cheesemakers. His territory — northeastern Asia — included Korea and China, as well as Japan.

Within a year, Mr. Larcher said, he realized the job was not for him.

“I was recommending the best starters for…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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David Budbill’s opera returns to the Kingdom

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After a neighbor criticizes her behavior, Grace (Mary Bonhag) vents her anger at her prying neighbors. Photo by Joseph Gresser.

After a neighbor criticizes her behavior, Grace (Mary Bonhag) vents her anger at her prying neighbors. Photo by Joseph Gresser.

copyright the Chronicle September 2, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

MONTPELIER — Many people think of opera as an art that’s far removed from their daily concerns. That may or may not be the case with the traditional repertory, but the people who inhabit A Fleeting Animal, the collaboration between poet David Budbill (formerly of Wolcott) and Brookfield composer Erik Nielsen, will be recognizable to anyone in the Northeast Kingdom.

The opera had its premiere and a Vermont tour 15 years ago. Those who missed it then have another chance when the show returns for a six-town tour between September 11 and September 20. It will hit the Kingdom on Sunday, September 13, for a 4 p.m. performance at the Hardwick Town House.

On Monday evening the cast and production crew were hard at work putting the…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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East Albany Catholic church is likely to be sold

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The nearly 150-year-old Catholic church here could go up for sale soon.  Photo by Tena Starr

The nearly 150-year-old Catholic church here could go up for sale soon. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle August 26, 2015

EAST ALBANY — The nearly 150-year-old Catholic church here could go up for sale soon.

Mass hasn’t been said at the church for some time now, but it has been used for weddings, baptisms, funerals, and until a few years ago there were services on Catholic holidays, said longtime parishioner Paul Daniels.

Mr. Daniels provided a tour of the old church on Sunday, a church his Irish ancestors helped build starting in 1869, he said. He’s feeling nostalgic about its demise, which has come about both through lack of attendance and the need for repairs, said parish priest Tim Naples.

The problem is a financial one, not particular to St. John of the Cross Church, but to the entire Most Holy Trinity Parish, which includes…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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