Veterans remember Pearl Harbor

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Inspired by Charles Lindbergh’s historic transatlantic flight, Lindy Palin dreamed of flying ever since he was a boy.  As part of the Eighth Air Force, Mr. Palin flew bombing missions over Europe from a base in England, one of the few pilots to survive his 35 missions unscathed, although he ended up in a prisoner of war camp after a forced landing.  He wears the Army Air Corps hat in memory of a friend.  Photos by Elizabeth Trail

Inspired by Charles Lindbergh’s historic transatlantic flight, Lindy Palin dreamed of flying ever since he was a boy. As part of the Eighth Air Force, Mr. Palin flew bombing missions over Europe from a base in England, one of the few pilots to survive his 35 missions unscathed, although he ended up in a prisoner of war camp after a forced landing. He wears the Army Air Corps hat in memory of a friend. Photos by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle December 9, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

NEWPORT — As the years pass, fewer and fewer people are alive who remember what they were doing when they heard the news of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.

On Monday morning, 74 years later, Army Sergeant Major Retired John Wilson of Newport had to stop and remind several local businesses that Pearl Harbor Day is one of the handful of days of the year when flags must be flown at half-mast.

Mr. Wilson is a Vietnam combat veteran. He wasn’t even born on that long ago morning when Japanese bombers struck an American base in Hawaii, killing over 2,500 Americans. It was the event that brought the United States into World War II.

But at the Bel Aire Quality Care Nursing Center in Newport, men and women who still remember Pearl Harbor gathered in the common room at 2 p.m. Monday to share their memories of that day, and of the parts they… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Northsong’s performance was difficult, and brilliant

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The choral group Northsong performed its annual winter concert at the Barton United Church on Friday.  On Sunday they performed at the Newport United Church.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

The choral group Northsong performed its annual winter concert at the Barton United Church on Friday. On Sunday they performed at the Newport United Church. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle December 9, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

BARTON — The singers of Northsong received a standing ovation for their performance at the Barton United Church on Friday.

Led by Anne Hamilton, and accompanied by Vivian Spates on the piano, the choir performed music with origins as far back as the sixteenth century, with more modern pieces as well.

Before launching into the Kyrie movement of the Messe di Gloria, by Giacomo Puccini, Ms. Hamilton gave a bit of back story about the liturgical music written by Mr. Puccini, who is best known for his operas.

The Mass was performed when he wrote it in the nineteenth century, but he didn’t want to be associated with liturgical music, so it wasn’t published until the 1950s, long after his death in 1924.

The operatic quality of the composition is obvious, Ms. Hamilton explained to spectators before turning towards her singers… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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A week in Haiti: On visiting the “pearl of the Antilles”

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Haiti, the “pearl of the Antilles,” is a mountainous country with beautiful landscapes, and bright colors. Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Haiti, the “pearl of the Antilles,” is a mountainous country with beautiful landscapes, and bright colors. Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle December 2, 2015

This article is part one in a series.

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

The smell of charcoal cook fires, the feel of hot and heavy air, the sound of roosters crowing, the taste of fresh passion fruit juice …. Since the age of six, that’s what Haiti has been to me.

Haiti is a small mountainous country in the Caribbean that shares an island with the Dominican Republic.

If we were to play a word association game, the famous earthquake in 2010, or poverty, might spring to mind when one thinks of Haiti. Those were, and are, problems, but there’s more to see.

Getting there

For a long time, my father wouldn’t bring me to his native country because of political instability. I returned for the first time in 2011, and my dad took my brothers and me on… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Sugar and spice at the Leach Public Library

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Olivia Peters played in the gingerbread playhouse in the Leach Public Library once she finished decorating her cookies.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Olivia Peters played in the gingerbread playhouse in the Leach Public Library once she finished decorating her cookies. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle December 2, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

IRASBURG — The Leach Public Library in Irasburg held the ninth edition of its Gingerbread Open House on Saturday.

The promise of gingerbread featured on a sign outdoors lured people into the library, where the smells of Christmas — evergreens, sugar, and spice — greeted them.

From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. people could taste all kinds of cookies and cider, participate in a raffle, decorate cookies, and listen to beautiful music.

The purpose of the event was to raise money for the library, but it’s not a moneymaker, so the hope is that it will generate more traffic to the library, librarian and organizer Laurie Green said.

“We’ve never had it this early,” she said when asked about the turnout.

Normally the open house occurs… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Newport man worked on new Pixar film

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WEB hankin dinosaur spot cmyk

A still from The Good Dinosaur shows Arlo the dinosaur and Spot’s varmint-like aspect.

copyright the Chronicle December 2, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

When the credits start scrolling up the screen at the end of a film, most people head for the exit.

For that reason few will still be watching as Wayne Hankin’s name gets its moment of screen time at the end of The Good Dinosaur, which came out the day before Thanksgiving. During the film, audience members will hear the Newport man’s contribution to the character of Spot.

The Good Dinosaur is the latest offering from Pixar, a company specializing in computer generated animation that was bought by The Walt Disney Company in 2006.

The premise of the film is that the asteroid scientists believe hit Earth 65 million years ago, and precipitated the end of the dinosaur age, was instead a near miss. In the film a… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Entertaining the baby with gnocchi

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This set up is the baby’s eye view of making gnocchi as seen from a front carrier.  Photos by Natalie Hormilla

This set up is the baby’s eye view of making gnocchi as seen from a front carrier. Photos by Natalie Hormilla

copyright the Chronicle November 25, 2015

by Natalie Hormilla

When I became pregnant with my second child, an ugly fear lurked along the margins of my mind: How could I possibly love another child as much as the daughter I already had? Was it possible? Did all mothers secretly prefer one of their children? Grimly fantasize about what to do if forced to choose one child just before fleeing a burning building?

No. That plain absence of comprehension is now, of course, replaced with the deep knowing that you love each of your kids differently and yet the same. I had heard that thought from other mothers in the past, and its clichéd ring made it hard for me to accept as a complete answer. The satisfaction I now derive… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Meat pie contest launches Boots for Barton

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Judi Robitaille-Dunklee’s pie, decorated with cut-out stars on the top crust, won top honors at Saturday’s  meat pie contest.  The Barton veterinarian won $100 worth of cast-iron cookware at her first try at a cooking contest. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Judi Robitaille-Dunklee’s pie, decorated with cut-out stars on the top crust, won top honors at Saturday’s meat pie contest. The Barton veterinarian won $100 worth of cast-iron cookware at her first try at a cooking contest. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle November 25, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

BARTON — It was a first for Judi Robitaille-Dunklee when the Barton veterinarian’s family recipe won top honors — and $100 worth of cast-iron cookware — at E.M. Brown and Son’s meat pie contest on Saturday.

The event also marked the official launch of the hardware store’s new Boots for Barton program.

Contest entry fees, along with additional donations, go toward giving winter boots to children at Barton Graded School who don’t have adequate footwear for the coming winter.

“I’ll be able to call the school on Monday and tell them that we have enough for three pairs of boots,” Art LaPlante said with satisfaction. He is one of E.M. Brown’s owners.

Mr. LaPlante said he has been planning Boots for Barton for a while. He was surprised… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Orleans students gets letter from White House

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©the Chronicle, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

ORLEANS — Nine-year-old Nolan Myers has been watching his mailbox ever since last spring, when he sent a letter to President Obama, along with a picture of a model of the White House that he’d made in his third-grade art class at Orleans Elementary School. Finally, at the end of October, the nine year old boy got what he was hoping for — a letter from the President on official White House stationery.

President Obama also sent along photos of his family and their dogs.

The fourth-grader — and his art teacher Carol Woodard — are delighted.

This is the same Nolan Myers who made the news last year for…..

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North Country band plays at Disney World

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©the Chronicle, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

For 53 members of the North Country Union High School band, last week’s flying trip to perform at Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Florida, was an adventure they had worked toward for three years. For the 20 adult chaperones, it was a five-day challenge in planning and logistics.

For everyone, band director Bill Prue said the day after the group got back, it was exciting, exhausting, and utterly worthwhile.

This is the North Country band’s fifth trip to Orlando to participate in the Disney Performing Arts Program. Bands, vocal ensembles, and dance troupes from all over the country apply to get into the merit-based program.

The students go to a four-hour workshop one day, and then get to perform in the bandstand at Disney Springs, an area of the resort that used to be called Main Street Disney World. In between their musical obligations, they can enjoy Disney World’s other attractions.

“These kids have known since they were freshmen that they’d be going on this trip,” Mr. Prue said.

He thinks that the trip is a great motivation to keep students in the band throughout their high school careers.

Over the past three years, students have worked hard, both to make the band good enough to meet Disney’s high standards…….

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NEK residents give health insurance mixed reviews

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©the Chronicle, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

Despite both state and federal efforts to improve access to health care, relatively few small businesses in the area — the ones with fewer than 50 employees — offer medical insurance to their employees. And many people find themselves underinsured, if not uninsured.

The Vermont Health Connect website has been plagued with problems. And in spite of premium subsidies and tax advances, many people have high deductibles and out-of-pocket costs that, in practical terms, mean that they just don’t get health care.

Yet, Vermont ranks top in the nation for the percentage of insured children. And it’s second only to Massachusetts for having the highest percentage of insured people overall. And thanks to a generous expanded Medicaid program 143,000 low-income Vermonters pay little or nothing for their medical care.

In some cases, it’s not clear whether employees would actually be better off being insured through their employer, or going it on their own through the exchange…

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