Bel-Aire veterans are feted

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Sergeant Major Retired John Wilson (left) had only a few days notice to pull together an event to honor World War Two veterans at the Bel-Aire Quality Care Nursing Center in Newport on Tuesday. With Mr. Wilson, from left to right are Dick Baraw, a Korean-era Army veteran and a former mayor of Newport; Mr. Wilson's daughter Jennifer Wilson; Vietnam veteran Robert Davio; and Francis Ormsbee, who served in the Air Force in Korea. In short speeches, the veterans expressed their gratitude to the ten World War II veterans who stay at Bel-Aire. Miss Wilson's fourth-grade class at St. Paul's School in Barton made cards. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Sergeant Major Retired John Wilson (left) had only a few days notice to pull together an event to honor World War Two veterans at the Bel-Aire Quality Care Nursing Center in Newport on Tuesday. With Mr. Wilson, from left to right are Dick Baraw, a Korean-era Army veteran and a former mayor of Newport; Mr. Wilson’s daughter Jennifer Wilson; Vietnam veteran Robert Davio; and Francis Ormsbee, who served in the Air Force in Korea. In short speeches, the veterans expressed their gratitude to the ten World War II veterans who stay at Bel-Aire. Miss Wilson’s fourth-grade class at St. Paul’s School in Barton made cards. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle November 11, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

NEWPORT — Jennifer Wilson’s fourth-grade class at St. Paul’s School in Barton made 83 cards for area veterans this year to thank them for their service to the country. The project took the children more than two weeks. Most of the cards were mailed last week, but on Tuesday morning, at a special event at the Bel-Aire Quality Care Center in Newport, the children had a chance to meet ten World War II veterans and personally hand them cards.

The occasion was a special ceremony planned to honor the veterans, now in their nineties, by Jennifer Wilson’s father, Sergeant Major Retired John Wilson.

Mr. Wilson, a familiar figure… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Matt Sargent discusses heat pumps

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Matt Sargent. Photo by Joseph Gresser

Matt Sargent. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle November 4, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

CRAFTSBURY COMMON — Cold weather heat pumps could save money, but it depends on how people currently heat their homes. That was part of the message delivered by Matt Sargent of Efficiency Vermont to a crowd of nearly 50 people who squeezed into the Craftsbury library on October 21 to hear a talk sponsored by the Craftsbury Energy Committee.

Most people are familiar with the idea of heat pumps, very commonly seen in the form of air conditioners. Mr. Shepard reminded his audience that the air coming out of a window mounted air conditioner is warm. That, he explained, is because the unit extracts the heat from indoor air and moves it outside.

At its simplest the heat pump is an air conditioner operating in reverse, pulling heat from outside air and releasing it inside. High efficiency cold weather heat pumps can do this… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Gamache explains how Efficiency Vermont can help with energy costs

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Elizabeth Gamache, director of Efficiency Vermont, at a Newport City Council meeting October 19.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Elizabeth Gamache, director of Efficiency Vermont, at a Newport City Council meeting October 19. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle November 4, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — Elizabeth Gamache, the new head of Efficiency Vermont, is no stranger to the Northeast Kingdom. As manager for corporate services at the Vermont Electric Cooperative, for years she was the spokesman for the area’s predominant power supplier.

In her new role, as director of a regulated electric utility, Ms. Gamache has been touring the state to explain her organization’s mandate and to offer its services to businesses, municipalities, and individuals.

On October 19, Ms. Gamache took a few moments away from her tour of Newport businesses to talk about the work done by Efficiency Vermont and what it offers Vermonters aside from lower prices on LED and compact fluorescent light bulbs.

She even had news about that program. When Efficiency Vermont first started… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Visiting fire chief shares his experience in Lac-Megantic

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Derby Line Fire Chief Craig Ellam, left, and Rangeley, Maine, Fire Chief Tim Pellerin compare track records after Chief Pellerin’s talk on Saturday evening.  “I got you beat,” Chief Ellam said about being chief since 1983.  Chief Pellerin has been the head of his department since 1995.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Derby Line Fire Chief Craig Ellam, left, and Rangeley, Maine, Fire Chief Tim Pellerin compare track records after Chief Pellerin’s talk on Saturday evening. “I got you beat,” Chief Ellam said about being chief since 1983. Chief Pellerin has been the head of his department since 1995. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle October 28, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

DERBY LINE — Northeast International Mutual Aid hosted a talk about emergency services on Saturday, featuring guest speaker Chief Tim Pellerin of the Rangeley, Maine, fire department.

About 50 people, including civilians and firefighters from departments on both sides of the border, congregated in the North Country Union High School auditorium to hear him speak.

He talked about his experience responding to the general call for help from Lac-Megantic, Quebec, two years ago after a train carrying crude oil derailed, crashing into the town, causing multiple explosions, not to mention the deaths of 47 people.

The purpose of the talk was to provide area firefighters with his experience of a disaster of that magnitude, and the strategies that were used to cope with the accident, a one-kiloton explosion that registered on the Richter scale, and the loss of basic infrastructure like running… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Celebrating Thanksgiving in the U.S. and Canada

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The first American Thanksgiving meal as painted by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris.  Photo from the Library of Congress

The first American Thanksgiving meal as painted by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris. Photo from the Library of Congress

copyright the Chronicle October 21, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

On October 12, my American relatives and I joined my Canadian family in Montreal to celebrate Thanksgiving.

In North America, most of the holidays that we observe commemorate a specific event. I’ve always vaguely known the history of the first American Thanksgiving. There are many different stories about how the holiday started, but the best known is how Pilgrims celebrated a plentiful harvest with a feast in 1621 on the orders of Governor Bradford of the Plymouth colony.

Not for the first time, I wondered what it is that Canadians commemorate on the second Monday in October.

Some say Martin Frobisher, an Englishman who was trying to find a northern passage to the Pacific Ocean, and his expedition had… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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The wheat that might save the world

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Claire helps cut and bag experimental wheat plants at The Land Institute.  This is her second year working at the research center in Kansas, which is developing a wheat that can be grown like hay and harvested year after year.  Photo by Scott Bontz, courtesy of The Land Institute

Claire helps cut and bag experimental wheat plants at The Land Institute. This is her second year working at the research center in Kansas, which is developing a wheat that can be grown like hay and harvested year after year. Photo by Scott Bontz, courtesy of The Land Institute

copyright the Chronicle October 21, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

Before my daughter Claire went to work at The Land Institute, everything I knew about Kansas I learned from The Wizard of Oz.

My image of Kansas was wall-to-wall corn fields, stifling hot summers, and tornadoes that can suck up a whole house.

It did not seem like a promising place for my only daughter to move to. But if she has to be in Kansas, Salina looks like the place to be.

Salina is about the same size as Burlington. It has a branch of the University of Kansas and a fair amount of culture. It has coffee shops with live music and a full schedule of artsy festivals.

Of course as a mother, I was more worried about what it had in the way of tornado shelters.

However, getting a chance to work at The Land Institute had been Claire’s dream for years. She majored in sustainable agriculture in college, and early on she noticed that everything she read on the subject seemed to point to The Land Institute.

She is quite willing to ignore both heat and tornados to be there.

Developing perennial grain crops is the holy grail of agricultural research these days. And… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Barton arts collaborative debates uses of future home

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A pot of chrysanthemums livens the entrance to the future home of the Greater Barton Arts and Artists group.  Enough people have pledged financial support to proceed with buying the old house on Water Street next to the Chronicle building. Photos by Elizabeth Trail

A pot of chrysanthemums livens the entrance to the future home of the Greater Barton Arts and Artists group. Enough people have pledged financial support to proceed with buying the old house on Water Street next to the Chronicle building. Photos by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle October 14, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

BARTON — About 30 people attended an afternoon meeting of the Greater Barton Arts and Artists on Saturday at the dilapidated Water Street house that just may become their new home.

Those who came to the meeting agreed in principle that the century old house and barn would be a good place for an arts center. A few signed up to contribute time and skills to the project, and about 15 made pledges of financial support of $25 to $50 per month — enough to cover a mortgage payment and taxes.

The group’s organizers, Ed and Adrien Helm, have negotiated an option to buy the place from its current owner, James Ballard, for $45,000. The price includes the $21,000 Mr. Ballard spent this summer on a new steel roof, some foundation work, as well as a promise to replace the upstairs ceilings, which were damaged by… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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So many ways to make chili

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Meagan Joubert and Nathan Grimm of the North Country Career Center Culinary School were contestants in Saturday's Chilifest held in Newport.  One of the not-so-secret ingredients in their recipe was maple syrup. Photos by Tena Starr

Meagan Joubert and Nathan Grimm of the North Country Career Center Culinary School were contestants in Saturday’s Chilifest held in Newport. One of the not-so-secret ingredients in their recipe was maple syrup. Photos by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle October 14, 2015

by Tena Starr  

NEWPORT — Who would think there are so many ways to make chili?

The Chilifest here Saturday certainly demonstrated a lot of them, with recipes that ranged from dishes that included chicken to maple syrup.

Traditional recipes generally involve ground beef, tomatoes, onions, peppers, and spices. But there’s actually an International Chili Society that has cook-offs, and it appears there’s considerable debate about what makes the best chili, or even where it originated, though it seems to go back centuries.

In Newport, the annual Chilifest, at which participants can taste all the competitors’ samplings for $5, had its own wide range of offerings.

Meagan Joubert and Nathan Grimm are students at the… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Small Town Hobbies is a haven for both big kids and little

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Chris and Kristin Poginy of Poginy’s European Auto Works in Coventry opened a new store, Small town Hobbies, on Saturday.  Photos by Tena Starr

Chris and Kristin Poginy of Poginy’s European Auto Works in Coventry opened a new store, Small town Hobbies, on Saturday. Photos by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle October 14, 2015

by Tena Starr

COVENTRY — It was a chilly Saturday morning, but already a collection of enthralled boys had gathered around both the inside and outside tracks that Chris and Kristin Poginy have built for their new business, Small Town Hobbies.

Saturday was open house for the business, which is much more than a retail store. The Poginys hope it will become a gathering place for hobby car enthusiasts, who will use the tracks they’ve built to compete with each other, or just have fun.

The store, and the tracks, are the fruition of her husband’s lifelong dream, Ms. Poginy said. He’s still a boy at heart — and probably has a lot of company in that.

The hobby shop sells remote cars, robotics kits, model cars, trucks, mini-tanks and planes, paint-by-number sets, and much more. The models are motorized, and computer… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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The appeal of pony pulling

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Frankie Way of Lancaster, New Hampshire, formerly of Lyndonville, with one of his teams, Cannon (left) and Thunder at the New England Pulling Pony Association Roundup at the Orleans County Fairgrounds.  Photo by Tena Starr

Frankie Way of Lancaster, New Hampshire, formerly of Lyndonville, with one of his teams, Cannon (left) and Thunder at the New England Pulling Pony Association Roundup at the Orleans County Fairgrounds. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle October 14, 2015

by Tena Starr

BARTON — Pulling ponies of all sizes came to Barton over the weekend for three days of a sport that predates mechanization but is still beloved by many.

The New England Pony Pulling Association held its annual roundup in Barton this year, drawing competitors from a half dozen states.

Frankie Way of Lancaster, New Hampshire, was one of them, and he tried to explain the sport’s allure for him. He was walking Cannon and Thunder, one of his teams near the barns. His other team is named Rock and Peach.

He is also the driver for a monster team — Buck and Dreamer, owned by… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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