Charges still pending in prison hostage case

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copyright the Chronicle August 17, 2016

NEWPORT — Charges are still pending against the two inmates who are accused of seizing a guard and holding him hostage for roughly two hours last Thursday at Northern State Correctional Facility.

Inmates Mehmed Devac, 22, and Leroy Hughes, 32, were transferred to a facility elsewhere in the state after a prison negotiator succeeded in bringing the crisis to an end.

The prison guard, Malcolm Brown of Morgan, returned to work Friday, a decision that earned high praise from Mike Touchette of the Department of Corrections.

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Roadside needles are evidence of a larger problem

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copyright the Chronicle August 17, 2016

by Elizabeth Trail

 Newport City Police are handing out a brochure that they hope will stop the littering of used hypodermic needles around town.

The brochure tells drug users how to exchange old needles for clean ones without being in contact with the police. The program, worked out in partnership with the St. Johnsbury-based nonprofit Vermont Safe, is free and anonymous.

Vermont Safe also offers mobile needle exchange by appointment in Barton and Orleans.

For the last couple of years, the Newport Police Department has seen a major increase in the number of needles found in parks, parking areas, and on the streets, Sergeant Travis Bingham said.

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Derby Select Board Committee to study law enforcement

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copyright the Chronicle August 17, 2016

 

 by Joseph Gresser

DERBY — The Derby Select Board is far from convinced that the town needs more law enforcement, but members gave former State Representative, State Police trooper, and Game Warden Bob Lewis the go ahead when he offered to head up a fact-finding committee.

The issue of how the town ought to provide police protection has been discussed over the years, but it was brought to a head by State Police Lieutenant Walter Smith, who commands the Derby barracks, and Captain Mike Henry, who heads the St. Johnsbury outpost.

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Randi Calderwood killed in farm accident

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copyright the Chronicle August 17, 2016

CRAFTSBURY — A large funeral is expected here Wednesday for a 58-year-old farmer and fireman who was killed Saturday evening in a farm accident.

Randi Calderwood was killed on August 13 when the tractor he was driving rolled over.

Besides serving on the town’s volunteer fire department, Mr. Calderwood’s roots in the community run deep.

“I’ve known four generations of Calderwoods,” said Craftsbury Fire Chief Walter Gutzman. “They’re one of the stalwarts of Vermont farm families in this town.”

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2016 Primary results – Starr, Rodgers fend off challenge

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copyright the Chronicle August 10, 2016

Incumbent Democrats Bobby Starr and John Rodgers easily fended off a Primary challenge from Ron Horton of Jay for the two Essex-Orleans state Senate seats Tuesday.

Mr. Rodgers, from Glover, was the top vote getter with 1,651. Mr. Starr, from North Troy, had 1,633, and Mr. Horton’s total in the huge district, which stretches from Richford to Norton, was 712.

Overall, turnout was low, despite Secretary of State Jim Condos’ predictions to the contrary. In this area, there was just the one local Primary race, although there will be several races come the General Election in November…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Thousands turn out for historic schoolhouse journey

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copyright the Chronicle August 10, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

BROWNINGTON — The1823 Orleans County Grammar School traveled a third of a mile Monday with the help of 23 yoke of oxen and a pair of powerful hydrostatic motors. Peggy Day Gibson, director of the Old Stone House Museum, which owns the building and arranged for the move, estimated the crowd of onlookers at around 2,500 people.

On Sunday, organizers of the move were pleasantly surprised when more oxen than expected showed up for the move. The teams arrived from around the state, the largest contingent being members of the Hooves and Horns Club from the Randolph area…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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A 75-mile wheelchair odyssey for justice

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copyright the Chronicle August 10, 2016

by Elizabeth Trail

 JEFFERSONVILLE — A week or so ago, Danny Perry of Newport Center felt a sudden calling to take a trip. Not just any trip, but a 75-mile journey from Newport to Burlington in his wheelchair — and sometimes on his hands and knees — to speak out about injustice and inequality.

He didn’t plan, he didn’t pack. But two days later he crawled the first mile out of Newport Center, then hauled himself up into his hand-propelled chair and began to wheel himself along Route 105.

By Tuesday, he’d traveled Route 100 to Route 100C in Johnson, and then west on Route 15 as far as Cambridge.

On Saturday, August 13 — his thirty-fifth birthday — he will crawl the last mile up Church Street to Burlington City Hall on his hands and knees.…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Electric vehicle charging station in Derby Line

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copyright the Chronicle August 10, 2016

by Jef Barker

The first publicly available charger in Orleans County is now operational thanks to the Vermont Clean Cities Coalition, the First Universalist Parish of Derby Line, and Derby Line Village. The charger is at the church at 112 Main Street in Derby Line.

The Vermont Clean Cities Coalition offers incentive programs to help bring electric vehicle (EV) charging stations to the state.

One such program provides a Clipper Creek level-2, single-port charging station to Vermont businesses with at least ten employees, free of charge.

On August 2, the Derby Line Village Trustees agreed to support an application for one of the free charging stations, spearheaded by Barton resident Ed Helm…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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More named Renaissance Corp. director

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copyright the Chronicle August 3, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — It was July 28, Cynthia More’s first day on the job as executive director of the Newport City Renaissance Corporation (NCRC), and she didn’t have the key to her office.

Fortunately, Rick Woodward, the owner of the old Montgomery Ward building on Main Street and NCRC’s landlord, saw Ms. More’s predicament as she stood at the door and let her use his key.

Ms. More went in, followed by her husband, Gene McCormick, and a visitor, and she tried the desk chair out for size and looked around at the room’s bare walls.

By Tuesday the office was transformed. Ms. More had found banners trumpeting Newport’s marketing slogans and hung them on the walls. Swag, including Newport tote bags, medallions, and other NCRC branded items were out of storage and on display. Ms. More looked as if she had been on the job for years.

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Storm chasing — sometimes you win, sometimes you lose

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copyright the Chronicle August 3, 2016

by Steve Maleski

May 25, mid-afternoon, and we are east of Newton, Kansas, in the middle of a slim wedge of very unstable air extruded northward from a reservoir of moist, hot tropical air resident over east Texas and eastern Oklahoma. The tip of the wedge is near Manhattan, Kansas, about 100 miles farther north. A weak outflow boundary left by thunderstorms the previous day is in the vicinity; farther north is a warm front. Both boundaries will provide lift and low-level turning of the wind field that will be adequate to support supercells. The bigger question is: Which boundary should we focus on?

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