The not so obscure object of our desire

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copyright the Chronicle July 20, 2016

by Steve Maleski

At any given moment there are roughly 1,800 thunderstorms grumbling and sparking over the surface of the globe. That’s approximately 40,000 per day. Sixteen million per year. They’ve been recorded as far as 80 degrees north latitude over the central Arctic Ocean north of Siberia and Alaska, and as far south as the edges of Antarctica. The vast majority are what most of us would call garden variety — bright, noisy deliverers of a quick watering to lawns, gardens and woodlands in amounts ranging from little more than a gentle sprinkling to a thorough soaking.

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County youth at higher risk than average, survey says

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copyright the Chronicle July 20, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

A survey measuring risks to Vermont youth suggests Orleans County may be hazardous to their health. The state Department of Health conducts The Youth Risk Behavior Survey every two years.

It is part of a nationwide series of surveys, according to Colleen Moore de Ortiz, who serves as a public health nurse, school liaison, and chronic disease designee with the Department of Health.

The survey queries young people on topics ranging from whether they use seat belts to how many portions of fruits and vegetables they eat each week. It also includes questions on hot button issues such as drug and tobacco use, drinking, and sexual behavior.

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Residents and landowners reject commercial wind

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copyright the Chronicle July 20, 2016

by Elizabeth Trail

MORGAN — Only days after officials from the Public Service Board (PSB) toured the hayfield overlooking Lake Seymour where energy entrepreneur David Blittersdorf is planning to put a 500-kilowatt solar project, the Morgan Select Board held a special meeting to talk about the possibility of a wind project on the ridgeline above the town. About 110 people came to the meeting.

Of the 80-plus people in the school gym who identified themselves as residents or landowners when a nonbinding vote was called, only one hand rose in support of wind development.

A handful of people left during the question and answer period before the vote.

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Local golfer’s life saved by golf pro

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by Jef Barker

copyright the Chronicle July 13, 2016

ORLEANS — “They said I might have one or two hairline fractures in my ribs, but I can live with that,” Moe Jacobs said casually about his recent brush with death. His rescue involved CPR chest compressions and the use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) at the Orleans Country Club (OCC).

On June 30, OCC golf pro Josh Olney was returning to the clubhouse after running an errand. While passing near the fifth tee, he heard people calling for help. Golfer Moe Jacobs’ heart had stopped beating regularly, and he had collapsed and passed out.

“I was feeling pretty good when we got to the fifth hole — at the tee,” Mr. Jacobs said. He remembers feeling a little dizzy, for just a moment, then nothing until he woke up at the hospital, following a ride in an ambulance and flight in a helicopter.

That he was very close to the clubhouse, where the defibrillator was located, and that a trained employee happened to be passing by likely saved his life…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Mother of two headed for Boston for double lung transplant

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by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle July 13, 2016

IRASBURG — The average wait for a double lung transplant is 90 days. Katrina Griffin was officially added to the waiting list on March 20, so she’s almost to the four-month mark. She carries a beeper everywhere.

“It could be any minute,” the 35-year-old Irasburg mother of two says matter-of-factly. “When it beeps, I go.”

That will mean heading for Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, one of the few options in the Northeast for the surgery.

Ms. Griffin has a rare, possibly hereditary, lung condition called lymphangioleiomyomatosis, or LAM. LAM causes cysts to form in the lungs, swell, and burst, filling the lungs with fluid.

Except for dark circles under her eyes, Ms. Griffin hardly looks sick. There’s not an oxygen tank in sight. She laughs a lot, and her conversation is lively.

“Unfiltered, they call me,” she said with a mischievous grin…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Sterling College vandalism not viewed as prank

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by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle July 13, 2016

CRAFTSBURY COMMON — Sterling College President Matthew Derr wanted it clear that he does not consider recent vandalism at the school to be a prank. In a conversation Monday, Mr. Derr also insisted that there is no reason to believe that the person who made what he considers a homophobic statement is a member of the Craftsbury community.

On June 12 a gunman murdered 49 people and wounded another 53 at Pulse, a nightclub in Orlando, Florida, that was a welcoming place for members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community.

A couple of days later Sterling College put a rainbow flag on Dunbar Hall to show solidarity with those targeted in the attack.

On June 16 the campus woke to discover someone had pelted the building with eggs during the night…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Bears burglarize Island Pond

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by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle July 13, 2016

ISLAND POND — Leesa Timpson was upstairs doing housework last week when she heard noise in the kitchen. “Hey honey,” she called down, thinking her husband had come in and was making an early lunch.

But it wasn’t her husband; it was a bear, who had broken through the screen door, helped itself to a snack, and ambled back out. When Ms. Timpson heard the door slam, she went to the bedroom window, and “there was a bear walking down the ramp,” she said.

“You want to know what bears like?” said Cliff Timpson, her husband. “Cashews, olive oil, and marshmallows.”

Ms. Timpson said she came downstairs and saw the bear sitting at the end of the ramp just looking at her.

“I totally should have been afraid, but I wasn’t. I started banging on things and barking like a dog. It finally blinked at me and lumbered away. Then it hit me. Woops, there was a bear in my kitchen…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Storm chase, part one

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copyright the Chronicle July 6, 2016

by Steve Maleski

It was 1:20 p.m. We’d been up since six, on the road since just before seven. Hundreds of miles had flowed by under the wheels of the big white Toyota 4Runner that we picked out of the lineup in the lot of the Alamo Rental lot at Denver’s Stapleton Airport the evening before. Its color, high clearance and ample window space were qualities that recommended themselves to us. Likewise the nearly vertical windshield. We would be driving over rough roads, in possibly difficult conditions. The temperature would likely be hot at times: We would be seeking out areas of maximum heating. A vertical windshield would be less liable to shatter in hail, and we would probably encounter some, possibly large. The window space? We’d need that for the best omnidirectional visibility we could get. We were going storm chasing…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Stenger asks for time to settle EB-5 case

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copyright the Chronicle July 6, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

Bill Stenger, the president of Jay Peak Resorts and one of those named in a civil suit filed by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) in U.S. District Court in Miami, Florida, has asked for time to complete settlement talks in the case.

His lawyer filed a motion on June 27 asking that the date set for his response to the SEC be pushed back to August 19. It was the second such request Mr. Stenger has made. He also asked for a postponement a month earlier.

In making the request, Mr. Stenger’s lawyers, Stephanie Casey and Robert Martinez, said he and the SEC “are currently in the midst of serious, detailed settlement discussions.”

Ms. Casey and Mr. Martinez said neither the SEC nor Michael Goldberg, the court-appointed receiver who has been running Jay Peak and Burke Mountain Resorts since April, object to his request…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Dairy farmer settlement appealed

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copyright the Chronicle July 6, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

BURLINGTON — When U.S. District Court Judge Christina Reiss gave her approval to the $50-million settlement reached between dairy farmers and Dairy Farmers of America (DFA) and its marketing arm Dairy Marketing Services (DMS) one might have thought that ended the matter. Not so.

Two of the lead plaintiffs in the class action suit have asked for, and received, permission to challenge Judge Reiss’ decision in the U.S. Appeals Court for the Second Circuit. That appeals court, located in Boston, has jurisdiction over New England… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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