Holland citizens continue to oppose Dairy Air Wind

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copyright the Chronicle July 27, 2016

 

by Elizabeth Trail

At the Holland Select Board meeting on July 18, a recently formed group called Citizens for Responsible Energy in Holland (CREH) presented a petition signed by 52 citizens, asking the select board to do everything possible to oppose the proposed Dairy Air Wind project, and big wind turbines in general, in Holland.

The president of CREH, John Wagner, also gave the select board a letter that laid out the group’s position in more detail.

CREH is adding its voice to a lively debate that has been ongoing in Holland since May, when farmers Kim and Brian Champney announced that they are looking into putting up a 2.2-megawatt wind turbine on their farm. …To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Vermont lawyer helps free Gitmo detainee

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copyright the Chronicle July 27, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

Abu Zahir was cleared to return to his country on July 11, exactly 14 years after he was arrested by U.S. forces at his home in Afghanistan. For most of that time Mr. Zahir was held prisoner at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, while a pair of Vermont lawyers worked on his behalf.

One of the two, David Sleigh of St. Johnsbury, said Monday that Mr. Zahir was “recommended for transfer without reservation.” Mr. Sleigh said that means he will not be under supervision on his return to Afghanistan.

In its “unclassified summary of final determination,” his periodic review board noted Mr. Zahir’s “limited role in Taliban structure and activities, and the assessment that [he] was probably misidentified as the individual who had ties to al-Qaeda weapons facilitation” as some of its reasons for allowing his release.

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Flowering parsnips can be hazardous to your health

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copyright the Chronicle July 27, 2016 

by Jef Barker

Beware of those yellow roadside flowers that look like Queen Anne’s lace — the sap they produce can burn your skin.

Flowering parsnips pose a little known danger — they didn’t even get a cameo on last Friday’s Jeopardy, which included a poisonous plants category.

In the Northeast Kingdom, however, people are urged to stay clear of this potentially dangerous plant, which grows wild along roadsides and other unmaintained areas, according to the Vermont Department of Health website.

“Wild parsnips produce a sap, or plant juice, that can cause burns to the skin in the presence of sunlight,” the web page warns.

However, simply brushing up against a wild parsnip plant won’t normally cause a reaction. …To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Farmers suffer from steep drop in milk prices

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copyright the Chronicle July 27, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

A steep drop in milk prices over the past year or so is hurting farmers, and the insurance program intended to help them has not done its job. That’s the bad news from Leon Berthiaume, general manager of the St. Albans Cooperative Creamery.

He was quick to add happier tidings, such as the switch by consumers from skim and reduced fat back to whole milk, and continued high demand for butter. But his overall message was one of low prices and difficult margins into next year.

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The not so obscure object of our desire

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copyright the Chronicle July 20, 2016

by Steve Maleski

At any given moment there are roughly 1,800 thunderstorms grumbling and sparking over the surface of the globe. That’s approximately 40,000 per day. Sixteen million per year. They’ve been recorded as far as 80 degrees north latitude over the central Arctic Ocean north of Siberia and Alaska, and as far south as the edges of Antarctica. The vast majority are what most of us would call garden variety — bright, noisy deliverers of a quick watering to lawns, gardens and woodlands in amounts ranging from little more than a gentle sprinkling to a thorough soaking.

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County youth at higher risk than average, survey says

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copyright the Chronicle July 20, 2016

by Joseph Gresser

A survey measuring risks to Vermont youth suggests Orleans County may be hazardous to their health. The state Department of Health conducts The Youth Risk Behavior Survey every two years.

It is part of a nationwide series of surveys, according to Colleen Moore de Ortiz, who serves as a public health nurse, school liaison, and chronic disease designee with the Department of Health.

The survey queries young people on topics ranging from whether they use seat belts to how many portions of fruits and vegetables they eat each week. It also includes questions on hot button issues such as drug and tobacco use, drinking, and sexual behavior.

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Residents and landowners reject commercial wind

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copyright the Chronicle July 20, 2016

by Elizabeth Trail

MORGAN — Only days after officials from the Public Service Board (PSB) toured the hayfield overlooking Lake Seymour where energy entrepreneur David Blittersdorf is planning to put a 500-kilowatt solar project, the Morgan Select Board held a special meeting to talk about the possibility of a wind project on the ridgeline above the town. About 110 people came to the meeting.

Of the 80-plus people in the school gym who identified themselves as residents or landowners when a nonbinding vote was called, only one hand rose in support of wind development.

A handful of people left during the question and answer period before the vote.

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Cornelius brothers threaten parole officer

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copyright the Chronicle July 20, 2016

by Tena Starr

The State Police Vermont Intelligence Center (VIC) has cautioned Orleans County law enforcement officers about a possible threat from the Cornelius brothers, who have a history of erratic and violent behavior.

A safety bulletin issued July 17 says that the VIC has “been made aware of the escalating and increasingly unpredictable behavior of both Christian Cornelius and his brother Garrett Cornelius.

“Both brothers have lengthy criminal involvements and are currently involved in active and ongoing investigations involving unlawful trespass, violation of court orders, and violation of several restraining orders,” the safety bulletin says.

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Local golfer’s life saved by golf pro

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by Jef Barker

copyright the Chronicle July 13, 2016

ORLEANS — “They said I might have one or two hairline fractures in my ribs, but I can live with that,” Moe Jacobs said casually about his recent brush with death. His rescue involved CPR chest compressions and the use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) at the Orleans Country Club (OCC).

On June 30, OCC golf pro Josh Olney was returning to the clubhouse after running an errand. While passing near the fifth tee, he heard people calling for help. Golfer Moe Jacobs’ heart had stopped beating regularly, and he had collapsed and passed out.

“I was feeling pretty good when we got to the fifth hole — at the tee,” Mr. Jacobs said. He remembers feeling a little dizzy, for just a moment, then nothing until he woke up at the hospital, following a ride in an ambulance and flight in a helicopter.

That he was very close to the clubhouse, where the defibrillator was located, and that a trained employee happened to be passing by likely saved his life…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Mother of two headed for Boston for double lung transplant

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by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle July 13, 2016

IRASBURG — The average wait for a double lung transplant is 90 days. Katrina Griffin was officially added to the waiting list on March 20, so she’s almost to the four-month mark. She carries a beeper everywhere.

“It could be any minute,” the 35-year-old Irasburg mother of two says matter-of-factly. “When it beeps, I go.”

That will mean heading for Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, one of the few options in the Northeast for the surgery.

Ms. Griffin has a rare, possibly hereditary, lung condition called lymphangioleiomyomatosis, or LAM. LAM causes cysts to form in the lungs, swell, and burst, filling the lungs with fluid.

Except for dark circles under her eyes, Ms. Griffin hardly looks sick. There’s not an oxygen tank in sight. She laughs a lot, and her conversation is lively.

“Unfiltered, they call me,” she said with a mischievous grin…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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