Obituaries September 16, 2015

Dana Alden Blanchard

Dana Alden Blanchard, 65, of Newport died on September 8, 2015, at his home.

He was born on April 6, 1950, in Barton to Alden Blanchard and the late Alva (Spaulding) Blanchard.

He was employed by the Newport Daily Express, Northeast Kingdom Mental Health, and Metal Flex. He was interested in the history of Newport and surrounding areas.

He will be dearly missed by his dad who was always interested in his well-being.

He is survived by his father, Alden Blanchard; his wife, Marilyn, of Newport; his aunts and uncles; and several cousins.

Services will be held at the convenience of the family.

Online condolences at curtis-britch.com.

 

obit brenek2Paul Edward Brenek

Paul Edward Brenek, 55, died on August 26, 2015, at his home in Sonoma, California after a battle with cancer. He is in heaven now.

He was born on October 8,1959, in Norwich, Connecticut to Martha Burke Brenek and Donald Brenek.

He was a wonderful husband, dad and grandfather — good hearted and loved his family dearly. He graduated from Griswold High School in Jewett City, Connecticut. He decided to go to California. He spent his life there, and worked with his cousin Walt on automotive repair. Mr. Brenek decided to become a certified smog tester for the State of California and worked with Sonoma Truck for many years.

Paul will be in his family’s heart forever.

He is survived by his daughter Jessica Brenek and her husband, Brian Todd; and four grandchildren: Julian, Addisyn, Presten and Aiden. He is also survived by his wife, Kitty Klingburg Brenek; his brother Kenneth Brenek; his sisters: Diane Brenek Manning and her husband, Ron, and their sons: Shawn and Joshua; Lori Brenek Balczun and her husband, Paul, and their sons: Tyler and Bryan; his aunt Marilyn “Chochie” Brenek residing on Depot Road in Canterbury, Connecticut; his parents: Martha and Donald Brenek of Green Hill Road in Lowell; his aunt and uncle Brenda and Harvey Burke of Delta Junction, Alaska; and many aunts, uncles, and cousins in Maryland, North Carolina, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and California.

He was predeceased by his first wife, Julie Messier Brenek; his paternal grandparents: Emile and Anna Brenek of Depot Road in Canterbury; his maternal grandparents: Margaret and Frank Burke of Rixtown Road in Griswold, Connecticut.

A memorial service celebrating his life was held on Sunday, September 13, at St. Andrew Presbyterian Church in Sonoma. A reception sponsored by St. Andrew’s deacons was held after the service.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Hospice by the Bay at 17E Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, Larkspur, California 94939, or to the American Cancer Society in Sonoma.

 

Noamie N. Chaffee

Noamie N. Chaffee, 73, of Irasburg died on September 10, 2015, at her home.

She was born on June 24, 1942, in Newport to Niles and Constance (Rushlow) Bean. She married James Chaffee, who predeceased her in 2006. Her hobbies included going shopping and playing games on her iPad.

She is survived by her children: Dawn Gaudette and her fiancé, Tim Centeno, of Irasburg, and Robert Chaffee and his wife, Wanda, of Hendersonville, North Carolina. She is also survived by her grandchildren: Jonathan Chaffee, Bradley Chaffee and Ryan Centeno; her siblings: Sunny (Yolanda) Bean of North Troy, and Joyce Pray and her husband, Ronald, of Irasburg; and several nieces and nephews.

A graveside service will be held at 1 p.m. on Thursday, September 17, at the Mountainview Cemetery in Lowell.

Online condolences at curtis-britch.com.

 

obit joseph VETRobert Joseph

Robert Joseph, 78, of Derby died suddenly at his home on September 9, 2015.

He was born January 6, 1937, to Lessel (Coutts) Joseph and George “Joe” Joseph.

He graduated from Derby Academy in 1955, and went into the Navy. He was a hardworking, generous and kind man who took care of his mother until she died. He worked for many years at Union Butterfield Tivoly in Derby Line, Agway in Newport, and 20 years at Ducharme Excavating in Derby Line. He was a workaholic who liked to keep busy, and who went until he just couldn’t go any more.

He loved to help others and he loved his community. He enjoyed working in the woods year-round. He would ride on the groomer with Mike Judd in the winter and help in the sugarbush in the spring. He liked to help with haying in the summer months and he often talked about spending summers out on the Aldrich family farm growing up. He spent his last 18 years with his cousins, where he wanted to settle and retire.

His interests included classic and muscle cars, especially Chevys, and also Farmall tractors and old farm equipment. He owned two Monte Carlos and two old Farmalls, until recently. He liked to go to frequent car and tractor shows at the fairgrounds.

obit vets flagHe is survived by his brother “Huz” Joseph of Newport; and his children: Susan Marie Mason, Brett Joseph, Hayley Joseph, Robyn Joseph Robar, and Gary Joseph; his sister-in-law Ruthy Joseph and her daughters: Cindy Joseph Shepardson and Jennifer Joseph Koslowsky; several grandnieces and -nephews; and three great-grandnephews. He is also survived by several cousins, close friends, and neighbors who loved him dearly and certainly thought of him as family. He was especially close with his cousins: Robert and Dean Aldrich, and Beatrice “Sis” (Aldrich) Nelson and her husband, Roger, Doug and Keith Gray, and Mike and Brad Judd.

Mr. Joseph was predeceased by his parents; a sister Patricia “Tisha” Joseph; his brother Alfred “Al” Joseph; his cousins: Bill and Jim Aldrich; and his best friend Dwight “Shine” Judd, with whom he spent several winters in Florida.

At his request, there will be no formal services. There will be a gathering for friends and family to reminisce about Mr. Joseph, which will be announced at a later date. Something will also be done in the spring at one of his favorite spots on the hill near the Aldrich and Judd family farms where he spent many of his childhood years.

Should friends desire, donations in his memory may be made to the Haskell Free Library, P.O. Box 337, Derby Line, Vermont 05830, or to the Coutts-Moriarty Camp, P.O. Box 595, Derby, Vermont 05829, or to the charity of one’s choice.

Online condolences at curtis-britch.com.

 

obit Jourdan VETWilliam P. Jourdan

William P. Jourdan, 68, of Westfield died on August 24, 2015, at his home.

He was born on May 23, 1947, in Montpelier to William and Blanche (Allard) Jourdan. He graduated from People’s Academy in Morrisville.

On June 1, 1985, he married the former Joan Clarke, who survives him.

He was a veteran of the United States Navy. Mr. Jourdan was employed as an electrician for Gould Electric Company in Stowe.

He is survived by his wife, Joan Jourdan, of Westfield.

Services will be held at the convenience of the family.

obit vets flagShould friends desire, contributions in his memory may be made to Cheryl Atwood, 892 Porter Brook Road, East Hardwick, Vermont 05836, to help support financial needs.

Online condolences at curtis-britch.com.

 

 

Obit LaCasseOdila “Del” LaCasse 

Odila “Del” LaCasse, 75, formerly of Island Pond died on Friday, September 4, 2015.

She was born on April 21, 1940, in Burlington, the daughter of the late Ovila and Juliette (Hebert) Quintin. She was married on October 12, 1973, to the love of her life, the late Freeman “Bud” LaCasse.

She loved to crochet, was an avid traveler, and lived in Alaska and Arkansas, always returning to her roots in Vermont. She loved baseball, especially the Cardinals, and loved to laugh and enjoy her family.

She is survived by one sister, Rosalie Paquette of Massachusetts; by one brother, Albert Quintin of Vermont; her in-laws and extended family, the LaCasse Family; as well as many nieces and nephews.

She was predeceased by her daughter Sandy Simpson; her husband; four brothers: Phil, Ernie, Paul and John Quintin; three sisters: Cora Martin, Alice Perrow and Laura Fleming.

A mass of Christian burial was celebrated on Saturday, September 12, at St. Luke’s Catholic Church. Interment followed in St. Luke’s Cemetery in Fairfax.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Boys Town at boystown.org, or mailed to 14100 Crawford Street, Boys Town, Nebraska 68010.

Online condolences at curtis-britch.com.

 

obit vets flagReginald Gordon Lacoss

Reginald Gordon Lacoss, 79, of Irasburg, died on September 7, 2015, in Glover.

He was born on February 25, 1936, in Orleans to Archie and Katherine (Johnson) Lacoss.

On August 15, 1958, he married Shirley Simino, who predeceased him on July 20, 2011. He was a veteran of the United States Army.

Mr. Lacoss was a machinist at Butterfields Union Twist Company in Derby Line, where he retired after 30 years of service.

The Lacosses sold Christmas trees for many years on the Orleans Road, and did income taxes for over 50 years. They loved their horses and their dog Tanner. Mr. Lacoss would go hunting when he was younger and he and his wife loved to dance, play golf, and attended all of his class reunions.

He is survived by his siblings: Michael Lacoss and his wife, Betty, of Westmore, Robin Lacoss and his wife, Claire Talbot, of Newport Center, Bonnie Chartier and her husband, Joe, of Orleans; his sister-in-law Merrilyn Lacoss; his brothers-in-law: Dale Simino and his wife, Shery, and Gary Simino; and by many nieces and nephews, as well as his wife’s niece and nephew: Maxine and Harry Carbonneau, who spent many hours taking care of their horses and spending time with the Lacosses. He is also survived by special friends and neighbors: Steve and Tammy Jewett.

He was predeceased by his siblings: Rodney Lacoss, Betty Moquin and her husband, Francis, Phyllis Vallier and her husband, Conrad, and Judith Wilcox.

Private services will be held at the convenience of the family. Should friends desire, contributions in his memory may be made to the Orleans Ambulance Unit, 102 Main Street, Orleans, Vermont 05860.

Online condolences at curtis-britch.com.

 

obit russellBrian D. Russell

Brian D. Russell, 56, of Derby died suddenly on September 12, 2015, at his home.

He was born on August 31, 1959, in Newport to Darrell and Phyllis Russell.

On September 1, 1984, he married Kim Nadeau, who survives him.

He worked for his brother as a mechanic for Russell Service in Orleans. He played baseball, softball and various sports. He was a member of the Newport Country Club for many years.

He is survived by his wife, Kim Russell, of Derby; his children: Douglas Russell of Derby Line, and Tracy Russell of Derby; his mother, Phyllis Russell of Orleans; his grandchildren: Connor, Madison, and Parker Russell; his brother Kevin Russell and his wife, Anita, of Barton; his nephews: Tommy Russell of Colchester, and Tim Russell of Barton; his close cousin Pat Russell of Barton; and several aunts and uncles.

He was predeceased by his father, Darrell Russell, in 1992, and by his cousin Clayton Russell in 1996.

Friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, September 16, at the Curtis-Britch-Converse-Rushford Funeral Home, 4670 Darling Hill Road, Newport, where funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. on Thursday, September 17, with the Reverend Don Vincent officiating. Interment will be in St. Mary’s Cemetery in Newport.

Should friends desire, contributions in his memory may be made to the Junior Golf at Newport Country Club, in care of Pat Hunt, 375 East Main Street, Newport, Vermont 05855. Online condolences at curtis-britch.com.

 

 

 

 

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Matt Dunne talks about challenges and opportunities

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Matt Dunne, a Democratic candidate for governor, held a community forum at Parker Pie in West Glover on Sunday afternoon.  The lists of challenges and opportunities generated at the brainstorming session will become part of Mr. Dunne’s campaign platform.  Jill Michaels, left, is the volunteer coordinator for the Dunne campaign.   Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Matt Dunne, a Democratic candidate for governor, held a community forum at Parker Pie in West Glover on Sunday afternoon. The lists of challenges and opportunities generated at the brainstorming session will become part of Mr. Dunne’s campaign platform. Jill Michaels, left, is the volunteer coordinator for the Dunne campaign. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle September 16, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

WEST GLOVER — Democratic gubernatorial candidate Matt Dunne came to the Parker Pie restaurant here Sunday to listen to what people think are the biggest challenges — and opportunities — facing Vermont.  Mr. Dunne wants to hold at least one community forum in every county in Vermont to help plan his campaign platform.

Over slices of what Mr. Dunne called “the best pizza in Vermont,” 13 people from Orleans County brainstormed ideas for the state’s future. Mr. Dunne plans to e-mail a copy of the lists the group generated back to everyone who came to the meeting. He will also compare his notes from all over the state, looking for common threads that will become the core of his platform. He hopes to become aware of issues that are unique to one area or another, he said, so that he can serve those constituents better.

Mr. Dunne, who lives in Hartland, is… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Out of the Darkness walk raises awareness about suicide

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This patchwork quilt, with a suicide victim on each patch, is displayed at every American Foundation for Suicide Prevention event in Newport.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

This patchwork quilt, with a suicide victim on each patch, is displayed at every American Foundation for Suicide Prevention event in Newport. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle September 16, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT — Brendan Donnelly, Gabriel Young, and Shawn Chaput were only a few of the names to be seen on colorful T-shirts worn by many of the 206 participants here Saturday, at the Out of the Darkness walk, which marked the end of National Suicide Prevention Week.

The three of them committed suicide, leaving behind confused and grieving friends and relatives.

Saturday’s event was meant to remember, to provide support for families, and to raise money and awareness about suicide.

Proceeds will go to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP). As of Monday, the event had raised $14,000.

The walk started at the bandstand in… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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A new spin on take-out

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Crispy catfish and freekeh with corn-cherry tomato sauté and marjoram. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph.

Crispy catfish and freekeh with corn-cherry tomato sauté and marjoram. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph.

copyright the Chronicle September 16, 2015

By Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

I recently discovered that the New York Times won’t deliver the newspaper to West Glover, where I live. A co-worker told me last week that Internet isn’t available where she lives.

When I first moved here I had to come to grips with the fact that I would have to pick up my pizza rather than having it delivered to my doorstep.

Rural areas are often overlooked when it comes to services, either because the demand isn’t high enough or logistics are too complicated. But Blue Apron isn’t one of those services. At least, not for West Glover.

My roommate signed up for it a while ago. Every week, he receives a cardboard… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Suspended Worlds — an excavation of long ago community life

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Suspended Worlds — an excavation of long ago community life, a book by Christine Hadsel.

Suspended Worlds — an excavation of long ago community life, a book by Christine Hadsel.

copyright the Chronicle September 16, 2015

Suspended Worlds: Historic Theater Scenery in Northern New England, by Christine Hadsel.  Published by David R. Godine, Boston, 2015; 188 pages, hardbound, $40.00.

reviewed by Joseph Gresser

With Suspended Worlds Christine Hadsel has created a coffee table book that belongs in the library of every Vermonter.  As a record of the work of Curtains Without Borders, the organization, it gives a clear account of an imaginative partnership that has, so far, saved 185 theater curtains from neglect.

Both her project and the book serve a deeper purpose in excavating a part of New England community life that has been largely forgotten as times and styles changed over 100 years.

In so doing Ms. Hadsel and her many collaborators have revealed an important part of the region’s artistic heritage that in… To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Annual F.O.L.K. festival in Lowell

Katherine Pion takes advantage of a huge inflatable slide for kids during the Lowell FOLK festival in 2013.  Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

Katherine Pion takes advantage of a huge inflatable slide for kids during the Lowell FOLK festival in 2013. Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

The annual F.O.L.K. Festival will take place at the Lowell Graded School in Lowell on Saturday, September 19.

The day starts with a parade at 11 a.m., starting at Missisquoi Lanes and ending at Lowell Graded School, chainsaw carving by Tower View Carvings, face painting by Donna, a variety of great vendors, bounce houses, petting zoo, children’s games, BBQ to benefit the LGS 8th grade Washington, D.C. trip, King Arthur baking contest, story walk, entertainment by Rockin’ Ron the Friendly Pirate and the F.O.L.K. auction with Richard Degre featuring items like a scenic airplane ride from Lakeview Aviation, Stowe Soaring glider ride, Jay Peak Pump House passes, gift baskets from Cabot and Lake Champlain chocolates and great items from House of Troy, VT Precision Woodworks, Poulin Grain, Cajun’s, Haskell Opera House, Lamoille County Players, Forget-Me-Not Shop, Big Lots, Tractor Supply and more.

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Sidelined train cars have neighbours worried

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One of the hundreds of propane tank cars stored on a railroad siding south of Barton.  Although railroad officials said the cars are secure, this car has been spray-painted by local graffiti artists.  The sign in the foreground marks the location of the Portland crude oil pipeline.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

One of the hundreds of propane tank cars stored on a railroad siding south of Barton. Although railroad officials said the cars are secure, this car has been spray-painted by local graffiti artists. The sign in the foreground marks the location of the Portland crude oil pipeline. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle September 9, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

BARTON — Five miles south of Barton, a long line of train cars built to carry propane gas sit idle on the railroad siding that runs along Route 5. In places, the siding is surrounded by woods. In other places it runs through wetlands, or past modest houses and trailers. Hundreds of tank cars, stretching in a line over a mile long, appeared in late July or early August, and people are worried.

“I noticed the line of cars when I was driving to Lyndonville with my son to buy some paint,” said Ellen Mass, who owns a summer home in West Glover.

With thoughts of the Lac-Megantic disaster in Quebec a few years ago, Ms. Mass called or e-mailed everyone she could think of who might know why a mile of tank cars suddenly appeared…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Irasburg wind opponents plan petition drive

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Irasburg Ridgeline Alliance (IRA) volunteer Becky Boulanger of Irasburg hands a Vermont state flag to Gary Bennett, also of Irasburg.  The flag is the final decoration for a hay wagon located near the south end of Irasburg Common.  It’s one of six  positioned throughout Irasburg in preparation for IRA’s “neighbor-to-neighbor” campaign kickoff meeting to be held at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 9, at the Irasburg Town Hall.  Photo by Cathy Bennett

Irasburg Ridgeline Alliance (IRA) volunteer Becky Boulanger of Irasburg hands a Vermont state flag to Gary Bennett, also of Irasburg. The flag is the final decoration for a hay wagon located near the south end of Irasburg Common. It’s one of six positioned throughout Irasburg in preparation for IRA’s “neighbor-to-neighbor” campaign kickoff meeting to be held at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 9, at the Irasburg Town Hall. Photo by Cathy Bennett

copyright the Chronicle September 9, 2015

by Tena Starr  

IRASBURG — A loose coalition called the Irasburg Ridge Alliance (IRA) has formed here to oppose David Blittersdorf’s plans for a two-tower commercial wind project on Kidder Hill.

The group will hold a meeting on Wednesday evening, September 9.

“The advice we got from our legislators is that the best chance we have to preserve Kidder Hill from industrial wind development is to present a unified and strong opposition from the town,” said Judith Jackson, an organizer.

With that in mind, she said, the group will start a petition drive to see how many Irasburg voters are opposed to Mr. Blittersdorf’s project.

“What we hope to ascertain is whether there is widespread opposition to it, and to launch a campaign to get as many signatures of Irasburg voters as possible for a petition to the select board to oppose the Kidder Hill project and to develop…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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New restaurant opens in Barton

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Edible Delight Café owners painted the inside of their restaurant with popping colors and decorated with vintage touches like the framed comic book covers lining the wall above the windows here.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Edible Delight Café owners painted the inside of their restaurant with popping colors and decorated with vintage touches like the framed comic book covers lining the wall above the windows here. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle September 9, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

BARTON — The Edible Delight Café opened here on Saturday, August 29. It’s located where the lunch counter used to be in the Pierce Block. Patrons can get breakfast, including pancakes and eggs, and lunch, including burgers, sandwiches, fish and chips, and more.

Owners Michelle and Janét Gatison and Jean Lindor opened the ice cream window earlier this summer while they continued renovations before…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Sheffield Field Day is animated by competition

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Edmond Lehous, left, stands and watches as his horseshoe heads for the stake.  To his right Gilbert Goodrich watches his hopes for a winning game go down the drain.  It wasn’t a new experience for Mr. Goodrich, who said his horseshoe team finished second this year to the one on which Mr. Lehous plays.  Photo by Joseph Gresser.

Edmond Lehous, left, stands and watches as his horseshoe heads for the stake. To his right Gilbert Goodrich watches his hopes for a winning game go down the drain. It wasn’t a new experience for Mr. Goodrich, who said his horseshoe team finished second this year to the one on which Mr. Lehous plays. Photo by Joseph Gresser.

copyright the Chronicle September 9, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

SHEFFIELD — On the surface the Sheffield Field Day is a carefree celebration of Labor Day and a summer’s harvest. Scratch the cheerful surface and you find that a fierce competitive spirit animates the entire event.

Judges scan the parade and award prizes to the best floats. Across the road vegetables are examined, and the finest festooned with ribbons, and on the midway youngsters and their parents test their skill in games of chance that pit sharp darts against tender balloons.

Most years, although sadly not this year, teams of horses contest to see which can pull the heaviest loads. And every year players of every age keep a sharp eye on multiple cards as the bingo caller cries out his numbers.

It seems that only the chicken barbecue…  To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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