USDA money available for home repair and ownership

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Leonard Gregoire stands in front of the house in Lyndonville, which he purchased with a USDA loan through its direct home ownership program.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Leonard Gregoire stands in front of the house in Lyndonville, which he purchased with a USDA loan through its direct home ownership program. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle June 24, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has about any kind of loan or grant a low-income homeowner, or prospective homeowner, could possibly need. And it wants to give that money out, especially in the Northeast Kingdom.

That’s the message rural development specialist Dianne Drown and regional director for rural development Jon-Michael Muise, both with the USDA, gave at a public meeting held at the Burke school on June 17.

The point of the USDA rural housing program is to help people own houses that are safe, clean, and affordable to heat.

Depending on income and credit, people could be eligible for a loan of up to $205,000 in Orleans County, $200,000 in Essex County, or $215,000 in….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Brownington gets $50,000 grant for new truck

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The town of Brownington got a new truck with the help of a $50,000 matching grant from the USDA.  From left to right are Brownington road foreman Leonard Messier, Town Clerk Cheryl Galipeau, select board Chairman Beverly White, Misty Sinsigalli of the USDA, grant writer Jan Delaney, and selectman Terry Curtis.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

The town of Brownington got a new truck with the help of a $50,000 matching grant from the USDA. From left to right are Brownington road foreman Leonard Messier, Town Clerk Cheryl Galipeau, select board Chairman Beverly White, Misty Sinsigalli of the USDA, grant writer Jan Delaney, and selectman Terry Curtis. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle June 17, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

BROWNINGTON — Jan Delaney describes herself as “just a Brownington citizen who wanted to help.”

She’s not a town official. She had never written a grant before, let alone a major one.  But when she saw that her town needed money to pay for a new truck, Ms. Delaney learned by doing.

In January, with help from Town Clerk Cheryl Galipeau and former Selectman Dean Perry, Ms. Delaney put in an application to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) for a $50,000 community facilities grant.

On June 11, Ms. Delaney’s efforts were rewarded when officials from the USDA came to Brownington….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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GMO bill splits local legislators by party

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Wheat at Butterworks Farm in Westfield is grown organically, with no genetic modifications.  Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

Wheat at Butterworks Farm in Westfield is grown organically, with no genetic modifications. Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

copyright the Chronicle May 21, 2014

by Bethany M. Dunbar

Orleans County farmers and consumers won’t be immediately affected by Vermont’s first-in-the-nation passage of legislation requiring labeling of foods with genetically modified ingredients.

The legislation allows two years for the rulemaking process, and potential challenges are brewing in the courts and in Congress in the meantime.

“I’m really proud of Vermont as a state,” said Jack Lazor of Butterworks Farm in Westfield, a leader in the organic farming movement. He said he has always thought those who like genetically modified organisms (GMOs) ought to be happy to include them on their labels.

“Well, if it’s that safe, label it and be proud of it,” he said.

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