Royal Lipizzan Stallions to perform at fairgrounds

Featured

Madeline McCoy, with her mother, Amy McCoy, and sister Sophie, pet an off duty Lipizzan in Barton Sunday.  Herrmanns’ Royal Lipizzan Stallions will return for more shows later this month.  Photo by Micaela Bedell

Madeline McCoy, with her mother, Amy McCoy, and sister Sophie, pet an off duty Lipizzan in Barton Sunday. Herrmanns’ Royal Lipizzan Stallions will return for more shows later this month. Photo by Micaela Bedell

The Royal Lipizzan Stallions will perform at the Orleans County fairgrounds in Barton, from Friday, August 1, to Sunday, August 3, and again from Friday, August 8, to Sunday, August 10.

The horses will be stabled at the fairgrounds. This is a rare opportunity to see these majestic equines perform.

Back in the days of sword-and-armor battle, horses were used as partners and soldiers in arms. One of the highest esteemed of the war horse breeds was the Lipizzan. Founded in the sixteenth century and used by Austrian forces, the breed was tailor made to have a born-in desire and athleticism to jump, leap, and kick their way through enemy lines. The historic rescue of the breed by General Patton during World War II is the only reason these horses still exist today. Thanks to the Herrmann family, the ancestors of those original horses are in the United States and perform the same maneuvers that were used in battle and are displayed to this day at the famous Spanish Riding School in Vienna, Austria.

Continue reading

Share

In Newport: Scott performs everyday job at country club

Lieutenant Governor Phil Scott helps a grounds crew at the Newport Country Club clear grass and spread new sand in a bunker between the ninth and eighteenth fairways.  “He knows how to use a shovel,” joked head golf professional Kim O’Neil.  “You can tell he’s done this before.” Photos by Micaela Bedell.

Lieutenant Governor Phil Scott helps a grounds crew at the Newport Country Club clear grass and spread new sand in a bunker between the ninth and eighteenth fairways. “He knows how to use a shovel,” joked head golf professional Kim O’Neil. “You can tell he’s done this before.” Photos by Micaela Bedell.

by Micaela Bedell

NEWPORT — Lieutenant Governor Phil Scott continued his tour of “everyday” Vermont jobs on Wednesday, June 19, by working alongside the grounds crew at the Newport Country Club (NCC).

Mr. Scott helped the crew from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., focusing primarily on spreading new sand and cleaning unwanted grass from the sand bunker between the ninth and eighteenth fairways.

When NCC board treasurer Sharon Booth first invited the lieutenant governor at the annual North Country Chamber of Commerce meeting in late May, she was half-joking.

“When he said, sure!  I didn’t think he was serious,” Ms. Booth said.  “But then he called and we were setting things up.”

Head golf professional Kim O’Neil said it was refreshing to have a politician pull through on something like this.

“Very rarely do you see this from a politician,” he said.  “He’s here for a full four hours today.  I offered to let him work in the pro shop, and he said he’d rather work outside.  You can trust we’ll put him to work.”

Good news for Lieutenant Governor Scott, because work is exactly the point of his “Vermont Everyday Jobs Tour.”  He described it as “taking a pulse of Vermont” by seeing different aspects of multiple industries, all the while learning what people are feeling and what pressures they do — or don’t — have.

“I’m a bit of a hands-on learner,” he said with a laugh.  “Always have been.”

The lieutenant governor has also installed utility lines with Green Mountain Power, made rounds at the emergency room in Porter Hospital in Middlebury, and taught spelling and reading comprehension to Union Memorial Elementary School second-graders in Colchester.

Lieutenant Governor Phil Scott (far right) listens to Newport Country Club Superintendent Ryan McCaffrey (center) explain how to clear a sand bunker as his co-workers for the day get started.  Pictured, from left, are Dylan Bohlman, Denis Comeau, Mr. McCaffrey, Laurent Leblanc Jr. and Lieutenant Governor Scott.

Lieutenant Governor Phil Scott (far right) listens to Newport Country Club Superintendent Ryan McCaffrey (center) explain how to clear a sand bunker as his co-workers for the day get started. Pictured, from left, are Dylan Bohlman, Denis Comeau, Mr. McCaffrey, Laurent Leblanc Jr. and Lieutenant Governor Scott.

Lieutenant Governor Scott said he thinks it should be easier for everyday Vermonters to feel represented by their politicians, and by working beside them he hopes to also hear them. The consensus from the crew and staff was that he did.

“He’s a guy that listens, and listens to both sides,” said four-year crew member and four-hour co-worker Denis Comeau.  “I like that.”

For more free articles from the Chronicle like this one, see our Featuring pages. For all the Chronicle’s stories, pick up a print copy or subscribe, either for print or digital  editions.

Share

Lowell church gets a new steeple

Lowell Church Steeple 3

Omer Roberge (left) and stepson Brian Dodds top the new steeple of the Lowell Congregational Church with a new stainless steel cross on Saturday. Over 140 hours of work went into welding the cross, which was created by students at the North Country Union High School Career Center. Photos by Micaela Bedell

by Micaela Bedell

LOWELL — A new steeple was installed on Lowell’s 72-year-old Congregational Church building this past Saturday.

Open the doors of Lowell Congregational and you’ll find a large, diverse family, said member Becky Erdman at Saturday’s steeple raising.  But the congregation wasn’t always so big, and a new steeple wouldn’t have been possible without material donations and volunteer work from an influx of new members.

“It’s literally standing room.  We have to put chairs in the aisles,” said Mrs. Erdman of the 30- to 80-member increase in membership.

Verniece St. Onge, the longest participating member of the congregation at over 50 years, attributed the increase in membership to “young blood.”

“We’ve got a young family here with a new pastor,” she said.  “And a choir, which we haven’t had in years.  We’re just booming.  We’re full of life again.”

Mrs. St. Onge and others attribute recent membership increases to Pastor David Dizazzo.

“When this pastor took over full time there was just — I don’t know.  People were affected,” said new member Don Nolti.  “He’s a great Bible-believing, Bible-preaching pastor, which is what attracted me.”

The Lowell Congregational Church acquired a new steeple Saturday.  The process took more than four hours, and over 20 congregation members gathered to watch.

The Lowell Congregational Church acquired a new steeple Saturday. The process took more than four hours, and over 20 congregation members gathered to watch.

Lowell Church Steeple 5

A new steeple tops the Lowell Congregational Church.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pastor Dizazzo, who gave his first sermon in the church on January 1, 2012, calls it more of a “right place at the right time” situation.  As he watched the beginning of the installation process, he mused on the symbolism of raising a cross higher onto the church.

“It’s very symbolic to us because, as a church, the goal is to lift Jesus higher,” he said.  “As we lift him up in our own lives, on top of the church is also this stainless steel cross.”

After a new church steeple was installed on Saturday, Lowell Congregational Church Pastor David Dizazzo embraces member Omer Roberge (left) in celebration.  Former Pastor John Genco’s wife, Ruth Genco, admires the steeple, and other members of the congregation clap for Mr. Roberge.

After a new church steeple was installed on Saturday, Lowell Congregational Church Pastor David Dizazzo embraces member Omer Roberge (left) in celebration. Former Pastor John Genco’s wife, Ruth Genco, admires the steeple, and other members of the congregation clap for Mr. Roberge.

Mrs. Erdman agreed that the cross is symbolic, but took it further.

“It’s a very modern cross going onto a very conservative church building,” she said.  “And [the combination] is going to work.  Because that’s exactly what’s going on inside.”

It took more than four hours to put up the new steeple Saturday morning.  It was done by congregation member Omer Roberge and his stepson Brian Dodds.  Over 140 hours went into welding the cross that topped the steeple, a product of North Country Union High School’s Career Center.  Instructor Roger Wells led seniors Ben Duranleau and Calvin Peacock and junior Paige Gagnon on the project.

Mr. Dodds constructed the base for the steeple, and roof brackets were donated by Guay General Repair and Steel in Newport Center.   Desrochers Crane Service in Derby also donated some time and equipment.

As the 170-year-old bell of Lowell Congregational rings to announce the new addition there are smiles all around.  The church has never had a steeple, but as eight-year-old Caleb Dizazzo put it, “This church was made for a steeple.”

For more free articles from the Chronicle like this one, see our Editor’s Picks pages.  For all the Chronicle’s stories, pick up a print copy or subscribe, either for print or digital editions.

Share