Craftsbury Academy graduation: Lieutenant Governor was featured speaker

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Craftsbury graduates celebrate the end of their high school careers in a traditional fashion.   Photo by Joseph Gresser

Craftsbury graduates celebrate the end of their high school careers in a traditional fashion. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 17, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

CRAFTSBURY COMMON — Craftsbury Academy graduated a class of 17 students Friday, June 12.  Looking at her seniors seated near her on the stage in the school’s new gymnasium, Principal Merri Greenia smiled broadly as she made a clear political statement.

“When small schools work, they work best,” she said.

After a legislative session that placed the state’s smaller school districts squarely in the crosshairs of budget cutters, Ms. Greenia’s message was unmistakable.

And Craftsbury’s Class of 2015 had every right to feel pride in their school and their own accomplishments.  Almost half the graduating class was National Honor Society members….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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North Country graduates look to future

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Keenan Warner acknowledges his cheering section after receiving his diploma Saturday evening.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Keenan Warner acknowledges his cheering section after receiving his diploma Saturday evening. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 10, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — Almost 200 seniors walked across the small stage put up in the North Country Union High School gymnasium Saturday evening, June 6. Each young man and woman received the document that marked a departure from a prescribed routine and the opening of the door to the future.

As is the custom at North Country, the ceremony was brief. Only an hour passed between the opening notes of Elgar’s “Pomp and Circumstance,” played in a stately manner by the school band, and the last bars of the piece played at a much brisker clip to suit the pace of the departing graduates.

In between, speakers praised the class of 2015 as a generous group of students, willing to give of their time and attention for the benefit of others.

North Country Principal Bill Rivard said….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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New “maker space” opens

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Yuri the Destroyer, with Lyndon Institute Headmaster Daren Houck at the controls, fires a laser to ignite a ribbon at the opening of The Foundry.  Foundry President Jim Schenck (center) and Vice-president Thomas Bishop (right) look on.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Yuri the Destroyer, with Lyndon Institute Headmaster Daren Houck at the controls, fires a laser to ignite a ribbon at the opening of The Foundry. Foundry President Jim Schenck (center) and Vice-president Thomas Bishop (right) look on. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 10, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

LYNDON CENTER — Yuri the Destroyer, a spider-legged robot armed with a laser, stood on a table in front of an unassuming building tucked behind the Lyndon Center post office. At the command of Lyndon Institute Headmaster Daren Houck, Yuri shot a beam of blue light at a crepe paper streamer. After a few seconds the streamer burst into flame.

The ribbon had been cut and on Saturday, June 6, the doors of the Northeast Kingdom’s first maker space, The Foundry, were officially open.

A maker space is a facility….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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A mobile home hits the road

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This house trailer was abandoned in Irasburg at the intersection of the West Glover Road and Burton Hill sometime early Monday morning.  On its journey from Glover it lost its tires, but ventured on, tearing up the gravel road.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

This house trailer was abandoned in Irasburg at the intersection of the West Glover Road and Burton Hill sometime early Monday morning. On its journey from Glover it lost its tires, but ventured on, tearing up the gravel road. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 3, 2015

by Tena Starr 

IRASBURG — Town officials here were flummoxed Monday morning by the appearance of a house trailer at the intersection of the West Glover Road and Burton Hill. Not beside the road — in the road.

Someone had hauled the big yellow trailer there overnight and left it leaning against a telephone pole. That someone had also left quite a mess behind him. The trailer had been dragged for several miles without tires and had badly damaged the gravel road.

The house trailer started its journey in Glover Sunday night, and with tires. It came north on Route 16….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Newport Jewelers has first burglary in 34 years

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Newport Jewelers in Newport was burglarized early Monday morning, the first time that’s happened in the 34 years that Lincoln and Jo-Ann Brooks have owned the store.    Photo by Joseph Gresser

Newport Jewelers in Newport was burglarized early Monday morning, the first time that’s happened in the 34 years that Lincoln and Jo-Ann Brooks have owned the store. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 3, 2015

by Tena Starr

NEWPORT — For the first time in the 34 years that Newport Jewelers has been in business, it’s been burglarized, said Lincoln Brooks, who owns the store with his wife, Jo-Ann.

At 4 a.m. on Monday, someone broke into the store, broke two jewelry cases, and “snatched and ran,” Mr. Brooks said.

He said that, as of Tuesday, they had not yet done an inventory so were not sure exactly what was missing, though he believes it could have been considerably worse.

A press release from the Newport Police Department says police responded to the alarm at 4:08 a.m. When they arrived, they found a broken window, and two display cases were broken “and items strewn about.”

The Main Street burglary was certainly brazen, Mr. Brooks said….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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At The Museum of Everyday Life:  the charms and trials of dust

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At great personal sacrifice, Linda Elbow refrained from cleaning her house for four months and put some of the results on display.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

At great personal sacrifice, Linda Elbow refrained from cleaning her house for four months and put some of the results on display. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 3, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

GLOVER — The Museum of Everyday Life, located in a retired dairy barn just off Route 16 south of Glover Village, opened its fifth season Sunday afternoon in the kind of damp weather that represses the subject of its new exhibit—dust.

In previous years the museum looked through its skewed lens at common items that generally have to be bought — pencils, matches, safety pins, and toothbrushes. Dust is with us whether we like it or not, and the museum’s chief curator, Clare Dolan, offers visitors a chance to examine a multitude of its many aspects.

Samples of coal dust, sawdust, grain dust, and gold dust were elegantly presented under a series of bell jars, along with detailed descriptions of the hazards or benefits each represents….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Ray charged with first-degree murder

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Orleans County Deputy Sheriff Phil Brooks with Jeffrey M. Ray of Brownington, who pled innocent in Superior Court Monday to first degree murder.  Mr. Ray, who is being held without bail, is accused of shooting another Brownington man, Rick Vreeland, Monday morning.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Orleans County Deputy Sheriff Phil Brooks with Jeffrey M. Ray of Brownington, who pled innocent in Superior Court Monday to first degree murder. Mr. Ray, who is being held without bail, is accused of shooting another Brownington man, Rick Vreeland, Monday morning. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle May 27, 2015

by Tena Starr  

NEWPORT — Jeffrey M. Ray, 51, of Brownington pled innocent here Tuesday to first degree murder and was held without bail.

Mr. Ray is accused of shooting and killing Rick Vreeland, 53, his former wife’s husband, on Monday.

Mr. Ray appeared in the Criminal Division of Orleans Superior Court looking the worse for wear. He was hospitalized on Monday as a result of a struggle with his son, who said he tried to take the gun away from Mr. Ray, his father, after Mr. Ray shot Mr. Vreeland, the boy’s stepfather, a police affidavit says.

The shooting apparently wasn’t a big surprise to those who knew the two men. Police affidavits indicate they had been at odds for years. Mr. Ray had repeatedly….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Construction of AnC Bio plant gets underway

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Many of those involved in planning AnC Bio help turn over the first shovels of dirt on May 14.  From left to right, are Vermont State Aeronautics Administrator Guy Rouelle, Jane Fortin and Cindy Robillard of the state Department of Labor, North Country Career Center Director Ilene Illuzzi, Alex Choi, former CEO of AnC Bio Korea, Jerry Davis of PEAK CM, Newport City Mayor Paul Monette, Ariel Quiros, co-owner of Jay Peak Resort and Mr. Stenger’s partner in AnC Bio, Bob Brown Petersen of NME Pharmaplan, AnC Bio Vermont CEO Ike Lee, Jake Lee, who heads development of artificial organs for AnC Bio, and Bill Stenger, president of Jay Peak Resort.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Many of those involved in planning AnC Bio help turn over the first shovels of dirt on May 14. From left to right, are Vermont State Aeronautics Administrator Guy Rouelle, Jane Fortin and Cindy Robillard of the state Department of Labor, North Country Career Center Director Ilene Illuzzi, Alex Choi, former CEO of AnC Bio Korea, Jerry Davis of PEAK CM, Newport City Mayor Paul Monette, Ariel Quiros, co-owner of Jay Peak Resort and Mr. Stenger’s partner in AnC Bio, Bob Brown Petersen of NME Pharmaplan, AnC Bio Vermont CEO Ike Lee, Jake Lee, who heads development of artificial organs for AnC Bio, and Bill Stenger, president of Jay Peak Resort. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle May 20, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — The long-delayed groundbreaking for AnC Bio took place under fair skies Thursday morning, May 14. Speakers hailed prospects for the $100-million biomedical facility, which is expected to employ between 400 and 500 people when it’s up and running in a year and a half.

They will include people involved in manufacturing artificial organs, technicians to help run equipment in the clean room suites that will be available for rent by independent researchers, and scientists to perform research on stem cell therapies, said Bill Stenger, president of Jay Peak and one of the principals of AnC Bio Vermont. Mr. Stenger said people with education levels up to post-graduate degrees could find jobs at AnC Bio…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Truck fished out of Willoughby

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A pickup in Willoughby.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

A pickup in Willoughby. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle May 13, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

WESTMORE — Bob Wesoja was out fishing on Willoughby Lake last week — for his truck.

Back in February, Mr. Wesoja was headed for his fishing shanty when the wind kicked up, and in white-out conditions he lost his way, steering his brand new Ford 150 onto a patch of thin ice.

He and a friend jumped through the windows to safety as the truck plunged into the lake’s frigid waters.

On Thursday of last week Mr. Wesoja, Chris McCarthy and Jereme LeBlanc started off at around 8 in the morning figuring the job would be done in a couple of hours.

They had little reason to think otherwise….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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In boys baseball: Rangers trip to Florida apparently paid off

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The Rangers pose in their camouflage uniforms for a group portrait.  In the back row, from left to right, are Coach Eric Degre, Ethan Willey, Eli Leroux, Matt Messier, Logan Harper, Brennan Perkins, and Liam Kennedy.  In the front are Kolby George, Noah Royer, Zach Royer, Dakota Macallister, Denver Bodette, Brady Perron, and Dillon Gile.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

The Rangers pose in their camouflage uniforms for a group portrait. In the back row, from left to right, are Coach Eric Degre, Ethan Willey, Eli Leroux, Matt Messier, Logan Harper, Brennan Perkins, and Liam Kennedy. In the front are Kolby George, Noah Royer, Zach Royer, Dakota Macallister, Denver Bodette, Brady Perron, and Dillon Gile. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle May 13, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

Major Leaguers begin each season with spring training, a time to polish skills that may have gotten rusty over the winter. For almost all clubs that means heading south to warm weather.

What works for the bigs ought to work for high school, thought Lake Region Union High School Baseball Coach Eric Degre. His staff and players agreed.

Deciding to head to warmer places was easy; making it happen was harder. Each player had to raise more than $1,000 to pay for the trip, but with help from the community they managed the feat. Their destination was Dodgertown in Vero Beach, Florida…. To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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