New “maker space” opens

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Yuri the Destroyer, with Lyndon Institute Headmaster Daren Houck at the controls, fires a laser to ignite a ribbon at the opening of The Foundry.  Foundry President Jim Schenck (center) and Vice-president Thomas Bishop (right) look on.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Yuri the Destroyer, with Lyndon Institute Headmaster Daren Houck at the controls, fires a laser to ignite a ribbon at the opening of The Foundry. Foundry President Jim Schenck (center) and Vice-president Thomas Bishop (right) look on. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 10, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

LYNDON CENTER — Yuri the Destroyer, a spider-legged robot armed with a laser, stood on a table in front of an unassuming building tucked behind the Lyndon Center post office. At the command of Lyndon Institute Headmaster Daren Houck, Yuri shot a beam of blue light at a crepe paper streamer. After a few seconds the streamer burst into flame.

The ribbon had been cut and on Saturday, June 6, the doors of the Northeast Kingdom’s first maker space, The Foundry, were officially open.

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contact Joseph Gresser at joseph@bartonchronicle.com

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“Maker space” seeks inventors

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Left to right are Thomas Bishop, Greg Shoppe, and Jim Schenck.  The three are starting a “maker space,” an inventors’ and machinists’ club, in Lyndonville.  Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

Left to right are Thomas Bishop, Greg Shoppe, and Jim Schenck. The three are starting a “maker space,” an inventors’ and machinists’ club, in Lyndonville. Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

copyright the Chronicle April 2, 2014

by Bethany M. Dunbar

LYNDONVILLE — The Northeast Kingdom might soon have an incubator space for entrepreneurs and hobbyists who want to invent or create mechanical or electronic devices.

Similar clubs have been popping up around the country and elsewhere in Vermont.  The project, or group, is sometimes called a “maker space.”  One opened last week in Burlington called the Generator.

Three men who dreamed up the idea for the local group, which they call the Foundry, did an interview to explain the concept last week.

“We want to make an incubation zone,” said Jim Schenck, an engineer for a manufacturing company in Lisbon, New Hampshire.  He and two friends, Thomas Bishop of Waterford and Greg Shoppe, who has an online promotion company called Graph Genius Inc., started talking about the idea and decided to see what others thought.

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