Evacuated Union House residents start to return

Featured

 

A tired firefighter, Alan Quintal of Barton, rests and cools off after coming out of the Union House.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

A tired firefighter, Alan Quintal of Barton, rests and cools off after coming out of the Union House. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle May 20, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

GLOVER — The Union House Nursing Home’s 40 residents, who were evacuated Sunday for what was at first thought to be a fire, will be able to start returning on Wednesday, owner Pat Russell said.

“We just had our inspection, and could start filling beds today,” Ms. Russell said Tuesday.

The nursing home’s occupants were speedily evacuated with help from staff, ambulance squads, law enforcement, and community volunteers who pitched in and helped, Ms. Russell said.

For several hours on Sunday afternoon, lights flashed and sirens blared as ambulances, fire trucks, and emergency responders crowded Glover Village responding to a call from the Union House Nursing Home.…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

In Glover: Select board signs new contract with Sheriff’s Department

Featured

 

Orleans County Sheriff Kirk Martin signs the contract that returns Sheriff’s Department patrols to Glover.  The town has been without coverage since the end of March.  Select board Chairman Michael Ladd (right) and Selectman Jack Sumberg look on.  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Orleans County Sheriff Kirk Martin signs the contract that returns Sheriff’s Department patrols to Glover. The town has been without coverage since the end of March. Select board Chairman Michael Ladd (right) and Selectman Jack Sumberg look on. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle May 20, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

GLOVER — Orleans County Sheriff Kirk Martin came to the Glover Select Board meeting on Thursday, May 14 to sign the town’s new contract with the Sheriff’s Department.

Following a heated discussion at Town Meeting in March, Glover voters elected not to renew the Sheriff’s Department contract when it expired at the end of March. Eventually, they kept $11,700 that had been budgeted for the Sheriff’s Department and said it should be used for “law enforcement.” They authorized the select board to figure out how to proceed.…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

Wheatley remembers World War II

Featured

 

Donald Wheatley served in the Army during World War II.  Here he poses with a picture of his outfit during the war, of which he is the last living member. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Donald Wheatley served in the Army during World War II. Here he poses with a picture of his outfit during the war, of which he is the last living member. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle May 20, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT — At 93, Donald Wheatley has witnessed most of the major events of the twentieth century, and participated in a big one, World War II.

“I’m 93 years young,” he said in an interview Friday. “I say that seriously. I’m only 93.”

His sister is 96 and still drives, and his father’s mind stayed sharp until he died at 106, Mr. Wheatley said.

None of the members of Mr. Wheatley’s Army outfit were casualties of war, but 70 years after the end of World War II, he is the last surviving member of his company.

“They say 1,000 World War II veterans die every day,” he said.…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

Print subscription

Annual online subscription

Short-term online subscription

(To find a particular article, search for the corresponding edition of the newspaper.)

Share

Bread and Puppet Museum opens June 7

File photo, taken at the Bread and Puppet Museum in Glover.

File photo, taken at the Bread and Puppet Museum in Glover.

As they have each spring for the past 40 years, the double doors of the old Dopp Farm in Glover will swing open at 2 p.m. on June 7 to mark the opening of the 2015 season of the Bread and Puppet Museum.

Burt Porter, a musician and poet, will welcome guests to the farm on Route 122 in Glover as he did for the museum’s inaugural season in 1975. Mr. Porter has had a long association with Bread and Puppet, performing in many circuses and pageants and writing texts and lyrics for shows including The Same Boat: The Passion of Chico Mendes (1989); The City of Brotherly Love (1998); Crows and Angels: Christmas Sonnets (1993); and, for this summer’s pageant, The Comet.

In addition to Mr. Porter’s music, the day’s activities, which will last until 5 p.m., will include Sacred Harp songs from the early American shape note tradition, short shows by local artists including poet Meredith Holch, Clare Dolan, founder and director of the Museum of Everyday Life in Glover, the Modern Times Theater, Adam Cook and Hayley Lewis, and Tom Azarian.

As always, puppeteer and baker Peter Schumann will provide plenty of fresh sourdough rye bread topped with aioli, a pungent garlic spread.

At 4 p.m. the touring company of the Bread and Puppet Theater, fresh from a two-week Northeast tour, will give a performance of the most recent version of Public Access Center for the Obvious in the Dirt Floor Theater.

All events are free to the public, although donations are always welcome.

Those who wish to know more about Bread and Puppet’s summer activities and opportunities to participate in them can stay for an informational meeting at 5 p.m.

What is now a puppet museum crammed from floor to ceiling with a mysterious multitude of figures and faces, was once a working barn. Where once sturdy workhorses hauled wagons piled high with hay, today stand puppets of all sizes, shapes, and colors.

Bread and Puppet moved to the farm in 1974 after four productive years as theater-in-residence at Goddard College in Plainfield. The transformation of the barn involved raking and sweeping a hundred years’ worth of chaff and debris from its 100-foot by 45- foot main floor into a huge stack near the entrance.

Once the barn was cleaned, puppeteers arranged puppets, masks, and painted curtains into scenes conveying themes and stories to visitors.

During the winter the museum is closed while the company works on new shows and tours. But each spring the museum undergoes its annual spiff-up in preparation for welcoming summer guests.

The museum is open daily until November 1 from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. and after shows. It is located on Route 122 off Route 16 and Interstate exits 24 and 25.

For more information please go to www.breadandpuppet.org. — from Bread and Puppet.

For more things to do, see Things to Do in the Northeast Kingdom.

Share

More agriculture, more jobs

Featured

 

Sweet Rowen Farmstead owner Paul Lisai poses in front of his creamery with his 16-year-old dog, Bailey.

Sweet Rowen Farmstead owner Paul Lisai poses in front of his creamery with his 16-year-old dog, Bailey.  Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle May 6, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

The six-year-old Farm to Plate initiative appears to be doing its job and has noticeably helped bolster Vermont’s farm and food economy, according to a report released earlier this year.

Among other things, the report, conducted by the Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund, says that, statewide, there were 748 food manufacturing firms in the state in 2014, a 37 percent increase over 2009. And between 2009 and 2013 4,189 new jobs were created in the food system. In all, about 60,000 Vermonters are employed as farmers, waiters, cheesemakers, brewers, bakers, butchers, grocery stockers, restaurateurs, manufacturers, marketers, distributors and other food related jobs, the report says.

Farm to Plate was part of the Vermont Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

Continue reading

Share

VEC will seek help from FEMA for storm damage

Featured

The heavy wet snow that stuck to trees in last week’s big snowstorm has caused power outages to continue throughout the week.   Photos by Tena Starr

The heavy wet snow that stuck to trees in last week’s big snowstorm has caused power outages to continue throughout the week. Photos by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle December 17, 2014 

by Tena Starr

Orleans County got off relatively lightly in last week’s big snowstorm. Several towns received a good foot of snow on the night of Tuesday, December 9. And they got it in a hurry.

But the county was not as affected by power outages as other places in Vermont.

By Monday afternoon, the Vermont Electric Cooperative (VEC) said that just 260 VEC members were without power. Line crews had repaired more than 35,000 outages since the storm, said spokesman Liz Gamache.

You could call last week’s storm the gift that kept on giving. After the initial mess was cleaned up, utilities warned that the heavy snow could continue to bring down trees and branches, causing more outages. And that’s just what happened.

Continue reading

Share

In Glover: Santa comes to town, in a fire truck

Featured

Alex Young of Glover attempts to toss a miniature wreath on one of the tines of a ten-point buck painted by Lorie Seadale.  Photos by David Dudley

Alex Young of Glover attempts to toss a miniature wreath on one of the tines of a ten-point buck painted by Lorie Seadale. Photos by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle December 17, 2014

by David Dudley

GLOVER — The fire station here was packed with children and their parents Saturday night waiting for Santa to arrive. Though Mr. Claus was late — apparently due to problems with his sled — there were still lots of things to do at the tenth annual Ride a Fire Truck with Santa, held by the Glover Volunteer Fire Department.

But nobody had to remind the children not to pout or cry. They were in the mood to make merry.

Continue reading

Share

Conley is inducted into New England Pony Pullers Hall of Fame

Featured

Doug Conley of Glover with Dan and King, his winning free-for-all team.  Mr. Conley was recently inducted into the New England Pony Pullers Hall of Fame.   Photo by Tena Starr

Doug Conley of Glover with Dan and King, his winning free-for-all team. Mr. Conley was recently inducted into the New England Pony Pullers Hall of Fame. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle October 29, 2014

by Tena Starr

GLOVER — Doug Conley was at home in Glover, laid up with a bad back, when he got a call from his friend Jake Randall, who was at what’s called the world championships for pony pulling.

Mr. Randall said: “You’ve just been inducted into the New England Pony Pullers Hall of Fame.”

“I thought he was lying,” Mr. Conley said.

He wasn’t. Both Mr. Randall and Mr. Conley’s wife, Judy, knew he was about to be inducted and had hoped to get him down to Massachusetts for the ceremony.

Continue reading

Share

In Glover: Association wants to close part of Shadow Lake

Featured

The Shadow Lake Association has petitioned the state, asking that a roughly one-acre section of Danforth Cove at the north end of Shadow Lake be temporarily closed to human use in order to control milfoil.  The area is already marked by orange buoys and is not supposed to be used for fishing, boating, or swimming.  Photo by Tena Starr

The Shadow Lake Association has petitioned the state, asking that a roughly one-acre section of Danforth Cove at the north end of Shadow Lake be temporarily closed to human use in order to control milfoil. The area is already marked by orange buoys and is not supposed to be used for fishing, boating, or swimming. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle September 3, 2014

by Tena Starr

GLOVER — Members of the Shadow Lake Association have petitioned the state, asking that a roughly one-acre section of the lake be closed to human use in order to control milfoil. It would be only the second time in Vermont that part of a lake has been closed to public use because of milfoil.

The last time the rule was exercised was in 1998 when part of Lake Morey was closed due to a milfoil infestation, said Matthew Probasco, aquatic nuisance control and pesticide general permit coordinator at the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).

Continue reading

Share

At Bread and Puppet: Fire revival for Gaza draws reflection, silence

Featured

Bread and Puppet Theater performers practice for a revival of Fire.  Photos by David Dudley

Bread and Puppet Theater performers practice for a revival of Fire. Photos by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle August 13, 2014

by David Dudley

GLOVER — Before the Bread and Puppet Theater’s Friday night performance of Fire, Genevieve Yeuillaz rakes the dirt floor theater. Though the audience rarely acknowledges her effort, she carefully makes lines in the dirt before each performance. It’s a way of making the space feel fresh. The raking is, perhaps for Ms. Yeuillaz, a meditation, a kind of prayer. She focuses her attentions on a seemingly small, repetitive task to rest her mind before the intense performance.

Continue reading

Share