Louis Garneau celebrates new U.S. headquarters

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Governor Peter Shumlin helps Louis Garneau cut a ribbon to symbolize the opening of his company’s new Derby facility.  Flanking the pair, from left to right, are Paul Garneau, Mr. Garneau’s father; Josée Ferland, company vice-president; Jeanine Garneau, Mr. Garneau’s mother; Megan Sullivan of Congressman Peter Welch’s office; Monique Arsenault, Mr. Garneau’s wife; William Garneau; and Victoria Garneau.  Edouard Garneau, Mr. Garneau’s other son, is not visible in the photograph.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Governor Peter Shumlin helps Louis Garneau cut a ribbon to symbolize the opening of his company’s new Derby facility. Flanking the pair, from left to right, are Paul Garneau, Mr. Garneau’s father; Josée Ferland, company vice-president; Jeanine Garneau, Mr. Garneau’s mother; Megan Sullivan of Congressman Peter Welch’s office; Monique Arsenault, Mr. Garneau’s wife; William Garneau; and Victoria Garneau. Edouard Garneau, Mr. Garneau’s other son, is not visible in the photograph. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle August 20, 2014

by Joseph Gresser

DERBY — A champagne toast celebrated the opening of the brand new U.S. headquarters of a family business that started in a Quebec garage 30 years ago. Louis Garneau, the founder of the company that bears his name, raised a glass along with Governor Peter Shumlin, state senators Bobby Starr and John Rodgers, local officials, and a host of other guests Thursday morning, August 14.

The toast followed the ceremonial ribbon cutting that inaugurated the 60,000-square-foot building.

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Quebec man makes 400-mile sojourn on foot

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Regent Hurtubise finds rest and an omelet at Paddie's Snack Bar in North Troy Saturday morning.  Photos by David Dudley

Regent Hurtubise finds rest and an omelet at Paddie’s Snack Bar in North Troy Saturday morning. Photos by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle August 6, 2014 

by David Dudley

DERBY — If you were driving along Route 105 this past weekend, or Route 5 on Monday, chances are you passed a well-tanned man, walking, pushing a cart with bicycle wheels alongside the road, accompanied by his dog. On Monday afternoon, he rambled his way through Derby, on his fiftieth consecutive day of walking this summer.

That man is Regent Hurtubise, 66, of Chartierville, Quebec, which is just across the New Hampshire border. His beloved dog, who travels with him, is named Rocky. Though Mr. Hurtubise may look, at first glance, like a drifter, he is a homeowner in Quebec, living off a pension from the Canadian government. Mr. Hurtubise and Rocky are on the final leg of a 400-mile walk.

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Perkins wins titanium in national dance competition

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Kendra Perkins is wearing the medal she won in Sheer Talent national competition in Las Vegas in July.  Behind her are some of her dance photos and trophies.  Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

Kendra Perkins is wearing the medal she won in Sheer Talent national competition in Las Vegas in July. Behind her are some of her dance photos and trophies. Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

copyright the Chronicle August 6, 2014

by Bethany M. Dunbar

DERBY — At age 19, Kendra Perkins was no stranger to national dance competition. She had been there four times before.

July 7 to 12 was her fifth time at the Sheer Talent competition, and she came home from Las Vegas with a titanium medal. Her score was 298 out of a possible 300 points from three judges.

“I came off the stage and I was bawling,” she said. She thought she had done badly. A perfectionist, she often reviews videos of herself dancing to try to improve. It turns out she did pretty well, even though she wasn’t satisfied herself.

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In boys AAU basketball: Orleans County Challengers go to the nationals

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Pictured are the Orleans County Challengers.  In the back row, from left to right, are: Shelly Lanou, Priscilla Stebenne, Isaiah Braithwaite, Ajay Warner, Drew Drageset, Dalton Gentley, Evan Inkel, and Albert Stebenne.  In the front are:  Matthew Menard, Braydon Leach, Landyn Leach, Dillon Stebbins, and Connor Lanou.  Photo courtesy of Martha Braithwaite

Pictured are the Orleans County Challengers. In the back row, from left to right, are: Shelly Lanou, Priscilla Stebenne, Isaiah Braithwaite, Ajay Warner, Drew Drageset, Dalton Gentley, Evan Inkel, and Albert Stebenne. In the front are: Matthew Menard, Braydon Leach, Landyn Leach, Dillon Stebbins, and Connor Lanou. Photo courtesy of Martha Braithwaite

copyright the Chronicle July 23, 2014

by Isaiah Braithwaite

MEMPHIS, Tennessee — We are the Orleans County Challengers. Players from Glover, Irasburg, Albany, Orleans and Derby compete for us. We got together for our first practice in March after our junior high basketball season ended. Despite being competitors just days before, we all immediately got along. Not only playing basketball but off the court, too, we were all friends before teammates.

It was obvious in our first game, that in Vermont, we would be a force to be reckoned with, scoring 79 points in our first game together. After four tournaments, with four games in each one, we were champions — we hadn’t lost a single game.

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Walmart hearings: Residents worried about increased traffic

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walmart giselle web

Giselle Seymour, who spent almost a decade gathering signatures to encourage Walmart to come to Derby, celebrates with developer Jeff Davis at Tuesday night’s Act 250 hearing. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 18, 2014

by Joseph Gresser

DERBY — As determined by the ballot and by anecdotal evidence, a large percentage of Derby residents favor the new Walmart Super Center slated for construction on Route 5.  But that doesn’t mean some don’t have serious reservations about the project.

Those reservations, particularly ones concerning how the 160,000-square-foot store will affect traffic and the economy of the town were well aired in a pair of hearings held at the Derby Municipal Building Monday and Tuesday.

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In Derby: New Walmart could add 218 jobs

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An architect’s rendering of the front of Derby’s new Walmart gives an idea of the range of merchandise the new store will offer.

An architect’s rendering of the front of Derby’s new Walmart gives an idea of the range of merchandise the new store will offer.

copyright the Chronicle May 28, 2014

by Joseph Gresser

DERBY — A new Walmart Supercenter could add 218 jobs and $4.7-million to area payrolls, according to an economic analysis submitted with permit applications on May 22. If the permitting process hits no snags, the new store could open by late fall of 2015.

The project will increase traffic on Route 5 by more than a third and could require at least two sets of new traffic signals on the Newport-Derby Road.

According to the permit documents submitted to the Derby Zoning Administrator and the District #7 Environmental Commission, the Walmart will likely include a grocery store, pharmacy, and auto center. It’s to be built between Route 5 and Shattuck Hill Road by Shattuck Hill Investments, LLC, a company owned by Burlington developer J.L. Davis.

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Dandelion Run was in memory of Terri Weed

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The Bag Ladies of Newfane and Townsend warmed up for their race.  They are:  Sandy Stark, Melanie Keiser, Penelope Monaney, Kimberly McCormack, and Kim Colligan.  Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

The Bag Ladies of Newfane and Townsend warmed up for their race. They are: Sandy Stark, Melanie Keiser, Penelope Monaney, Kimberly McCormack, and Kim Colligan. Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

copyright the Chronicle 5-21-2014

by Bethany M. Dunbar

DERBY — Pouring rain early Saturday morning let off in time for a few hundred runners to take to the roadsides at 9 a.m. in the sixth annual Dandelion Run.

One relay team was ready for the rain with a kind of team uniform — garbage bags with holes for heads and arms. The ladies called themselves the Bag Ladies of Newfane and did a dry dance to scare the rain away.  Valerie Dillon manned the staff parking area fully equipped with head-to-toe rain gear, a fisherman-type hat, and an umbrella.

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Hair salons are bright spot in local business

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Marie Turmel Kroeger sits inside her new 300-square foot salon.  Visible in the mirror is a portrait of women’s rights activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali, painted by Ms. Kroeger.  Photo by Natalie Hormilla

Marie Turmel Kroeger sits inside her new 300-square foot salon. Visible in the mirror is a portrait of women’s rights activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali, painted by Ms. Kroeger. Photo by Natalie Hormilla

copyright the Chronicle April 30, 2014 

by Natalie Hormilla

Marie Turmel Kroeger opened a hair salon in a refurbished milk house in Craftsbury last month with confidence and enthusiasm.

“It’s called faith in oneself,” she said, just a couple of weeks into officially opening The Milk House Hair Studio on King Farm Road.

Ms. Kroeger’s business offers a range of services, including hair cutting, coloring, highlighting, and styling, and other treatments like relaxed permanent waves and facial waxing. She also does makeup for, and consults on, events like weddings or professional makeovers.

Everything happens in a 300-square-foot space, restored and relocated from across the street by her husband, Ben. The space is decorated with artwork mostly painted by Ms. Kroeger herself.

“It’s really, really quaint, and very personalized,” she said.

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In Derby: Morin appointed clerk at heated meeting

Left to right are: Selectman Laura Dolgin, Selectman Beula-Jean Shattuck, Selectman Brian Smith, Selectman Stephen Gendreau, and Selectman Karen Jenne. Photo by Joseph Gresser (taken in May 2011)

copyright the Chronicle 10-10-12

by Joseph Gresser

DERBY — At a contentious meeting on Thursday, October 4, Derby selectmen voted to appoint Fay Morin interim town clerk and treasurer.  But town voters will go to the polls, probably in December and again on Town Meeting Day in March, to have their say on who should hold those offices.

The meeting at which the vote was taken was actually a continuation of the one that began on Monday, October 1.  That meeting was recessed for three days after the four selectmen present could not come to an agreement on filling the positions.

Selectman Laura Dolgin was not present for the October 1 meeting, but she was there to cast the deciding vote on October 4.

The vote to make Ms. Morin clerk and treasurer filled vacancies in Derby’s town government caused by the resignation of Nicole Daigle, who held both offices for 19 years.

Ms. Daigle took another job this summer, but offered to continue to serve in an unpaid supervisory capacity until Town Meeting Day.  She made the offer in executive session at the selectmen’s July 9 meeting, according to board chairman Brian Smith and Selectman Stephen Gendreau.

Both men said that Ms. Daigle asked the four selectmen who were present (Selectman Karen Jenne was not at that meeting) whether she ought to appoint an assistant clerk and treasurer to keep the office running until Town Meeting, or if the selectmen wanted to make the appointment.

Mr. Smith and Mr. Gendreau said the selectmen said Ms. Daigle, as town clerk and treasurer, should go ahead and fill the position.  Ms. Daigle named Ms. Morin assistant clerk and assistant treasurer after that meeting.

After some selectmen and members of the public objected to Ms. Daigle’s action at the following selectmen’s meeting, Ms. Daigle said she would resign immediately.  She was persuaded to stay on for a time, and agreed to hold the position until the end of September.

The interim appointments will be of short duration.  Mr. Smith said a petition calling for a special Town Meeting to fill the two positions until March had enough signatures to be valid.  The petition was presented to the selectmen on October 1 by Vicky Farrand-Lewis.

Mr. Smith said the selectmen will meet on October 15 to set a date for the vote.  Because Derby elects town officials by Australian ballot, the vote is unlikely to be held before December, Mr. Smith said.

Whatever the result of the balloting, it is questionable whether it will diminish the anger that was evident both between selectmen and among the 40 or so members of the public who attended the Thursday meeting.

Ms. Jenne said, “I did not attend the meeting on July 9, but I believe there was a violation of the open meeting law.”

“I disagree completely,” Ms. Dolgin shot back.

“It says in the minutes that no action was taken, but a hiring decision was made,” Ms. Jenne said.

“No action was taken by the select board and I am correct on that,” said Mr. Smith.

Ms. Dolgin read from a sheet of paper two Vermont laws that, she said, clearly authorized Ms. Daigle to appoint an assistant and required the selectmen to name a replacement for Ms. Daigle when her resignation became effective.

“You are the clerk of Derby Line,” Ms. Dolgin said to Ms. Jenne, “I’d think you would know this.”

A portion of those attending the meeting applauded Ms. Dolgin’s remark.

When Mr. Smith called for a vote Mr. Gendreau and Ms. Dolgin said they were in favor of appointing Ms. Morin, while Selectman Beula-Jean Shattuck and Ms. Jenne abstained, as they did at the October 1 meeting.  That left the question up to the chairman, Mr. Smith, but only after a long argument about whether to abstain from voting is to vote “No.”

Ms. Dolgin, who takes minutes at selectmen’s meetings, pressed both Ms. Shattuck and Ms. Jenne to explain their reasons for abstaining.  Ms. Shattuck at first refused to do more than say “that’s how I feel.”

Eventually, though, she told Ms. Dolgin that she believed the process leading up to the appointment of Ms. Morin was improper.

Ms. Dolgin then turned to Ms. Jenne, suggesting that she had a conflict of interest in the question because she is considering running for the two offices.

Ms. Jenne said she didn’t see what one thing had to do with another.

When Ms. Dolgin again asked her to explain her reasons for abstaining, Ms. Shattuck said, “There have been things that have been underhanded and I don’t like it.  I’m not going along with it.  It’s not an argument between us.”

Ms. Dolgin again asked for clarification.

Ms. Shattuck said, “Just keep talking — you’re burying yourself.  You’re not a lawyer — you think you are, but you’re not.”

A number of those present expressed their approval of Ms. Shattuck’s remark with applause.

Ms. Dolgin told Ms. Shattuck and Ms. Jenne that her minutes would show them as casting votes against Ms. Morin.

A chorus of protest arose from Ms. Shattuck, Ms. Jenne and many of those who gathered to observe the meeting.

Some appealed to Mr. Smith to prevent Ms. Dolgin from using the minutes in such a fashion.  Ms. Farrand-Lewis said that Ms. Dolgin should be required to write exactly what had been said at the meeting without inserting her opinions.

Mr. Smith ruled that Ms. Dolgin could write whatever she wanted, but that minutes would be reviewed and voted on at the next meeting.

Mr. Smith then cast his vote for appointing Ms. Morin interim clerk and treasurer, creating a majority in favor.

Mr. Gendreau then moved to adjourn the meeting.  A chorus of protest was heard from members of the public who demanded to be heard.

“We have an opportunity to speak according to open meeting law,” Ms. Farrand-Lewis said.  “We have the right.”

“We had discussion Monday night,” Mr. Smith responded, saying that the October 4 session was a continuation of the same meeting.

“In government the ultimate boss is the public.  You have the onus of responsibility to respond to the public,” Ms. Farrand-Lewis said.

“Your concerns will be addressed with the secretary of state in the morning,” Mr. Smith said.

“No, they won’t, they’ll be addressed with the Attorney General, because there was a violation of the open meeting law,” Ms. Farrand-Lewis shot back.

“We’ll discuss that and make sure everything is done correctly,” Mr. Smith said.

“What a kangaroo court you hold, Mr. Smith,” Ms. Farrand-Lewis replied.

As Mr. Smith called for a vote on the motion to adjourn, Ms. Farrand-Lewis said, “What a laughing stock.  You people are disgusting.”

That her opinion was not shared by all in attendance was shown by the round of applause given the board at the end of the meeting.

There were enough people who shared Ms. Farrand-Lewis’ views to ensure that the parking lot of the Derby municipal building was the scene of heated discussion long after the meeting’s end.

contact Joseph Gresser at joseph@bartonchronicle.com

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