Antiques and Uniques July 11

 

In Craftsbury, Saturday, this customer is seen through a stained-glass window, handcrafted by Joe Arborio, during the Antiques & Uniques Festival in 2014.  Photo by David Dudley

In Craftsbury, Saturday, this customer is seen through a stained-glass window, handcrafted by Joe Arborio, during the Antiques & Uniques Festival in 2014. Photo by David Dudley

The forty-fifth annual Antiques and Uniques Festival on Craftsbury Common will be held on Saturday, July 11, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The event is free of charge and open to all. The $5 parking donation goes to the Craftsbury Fire Department. This tented event is rain or shine with seating for seniors and games for children.

Festival goers of all ages come to enjoy shopping for antiques and Vermont crafts, sampling local and artisan food and drink, and picnicing outside of the barbecue tent — all of this to a live folk and fiddle musical backdrop.

With over 100 antiques dealers, Vermont craft vendors, and local specialty foods vendors, the crowd of shoppers easily draws thousands. And the demand for the local foods barbecue is something to be impressed by. With 95 percent of its food coming from within a 15-mile radius of Craftsbury, the barbecue tent is a splendiferous feast. Local grass-fed beef from Sawmill Brook Farm, organic sausages from LeBlanc Family Farm, Vermont Smoke and Cure hot dogs, Pete’s Greens’ organic greens, fresh eggs from Still Meadow Farm, and healthy vegan hummus wraps made by the Craftsbury General Store are just some of the foods available. The Cellars at Jasper Hill has been generous with the festival both in donated money and with donated product. The festival gladly tops their burgers and vegetable wraps with their world award-winning cheese.

The Antiques and Uniques Festival has been held the second Saturday in July every year since 1971 on Craftsbury Common.

The town of Craftsbury decided that it’s going to take a village to continue the festival tradition and therefore the entire village should benefit from it. Here’s how it works: Individuals who wish to volunteer for Antiques and Uniques keep track of the work hours they accumulate and choose a Craftsbury nonprofit or organization that they wish to represent. At the end of the event, all proceeds are distributed to the various organizations. This means that the entire town benefits from the festival because of the generosity of the volunteering patrons.

In a society where it’s so easy to throw things away and replace with the newer, faster and better, concepts like appreciating the “old” or “outdated” can seem ridiculous — but not when one slows down enough to explore the rare beauty and individuality of true craftsmanship. When one walks the green of Craftsbury Common and examines the vendors’ antiques and the crafters’ one-of-a-kind pieces, a feeling of awe arises.

For more information, visit townofcraftsbury.com or e-mail AntiquesAndUniquesVT@gmail.com or call (802) 777-8527. — submitted by Anne-Marie Keppel.

For more things to do, see Things to Do in the Northeast Kingdom.

Share

Buy fresh produce this fall through SNAP

Featured

Photo by Joseph Gresser

Photo by Joseph Gresser

Vermont Harvest, a new program piloted by Green Mountain Farm-to-School (GMFTS), will allow families receiving federal SNAP benefits, known in Vermont as 3SquaresVT, to purchase $75 worth of fresh fruits and vegetables at local Northeast Kingdom grocery stores.

The primary goal of the program is to increase the purchase of fresh fruits and vegetables by low-income consumers participating in SNAP by providing incentives at the following retail locations: C&C Supermarket in Barton, Ray’s Market in Irasburg, Craftsbury General Store in Craftsbury, and Vista Foods in Newport.

Beginning in August, SNAP participant households in Orleans and Essex counties will receive information about the program and instructions for redeeming their coupons, which will arrive beginning in September and remain valid through February 2016.

Continue reading

Share

“Spaceman” Santa helps promote Toys for Tots

Featured

Craftsbury General Store owner Emily Maclure, left, and Michelle Guenard, creator of Michelle’s Spicy Kimchee, pose on Santa’s lap.  Santa was being played by Red Sox baseball player Bill Lee.  Photos by Bethany M. Dunbar

Craftsbury General Store owner Emily Maclure, left, and Michelle Guenard, creator of Michelle’s Spicy Kimchi, pose on Santa’s lap. Santa was being played by Red Sox baseball player Bill Lee. Photos by Bethany M. Dunbar

by Bethany M. Dunbar

copyright the Chronicle 1-2-2013

CRAFTSBURY — The Toys for Tots box was looking a little sad.  Craftsbury General Store owner Emily Maclure was searching for a way to encourage customers to bring in a toy to donate to the project, which provides new toys for children who might not have a lot under the tree.

She got to talking about the situation with Bill Lee, the retired Red Sox baseball player who lives nearby.  Next thing you know, Mr. Lee was signed up to play Santa in order to get some more attention to the Toys for Tots program.

It was an opportunity for Mr. Lee to promote his new brand of wine, called Spaceman.  Add live music, provided by Mavis MacNeil and Andrew Koehler, and an event was born.

Mavis MacNeil and Andrew Koehler provided music for the event.

Mavis MacNeil and Andrew Koehler provided music for the event.

Spaceman was Mr. Lee’s nickname when he was on the Red Sox, and he had a label created that looks like an old-fashioned baseball card.  Mr. Lee grew up in the Napa Valley in California but has roots in Vermont as well.  He feels strongly that wines made in California are better because the state gets more sun.  He said maybe Vermont wines made with white grapes will be all right.

Spaceman wine is also a fund-raiser.  The label promises that a portion of the profits from the wine will go to the Red Sox Foundation, which supports a Red Sox Scholars program and an inner city baseball program.

Mr. Lee calls his wine a “petit cera cera.”

He describes it, on the label, as such:

“Shanghaied for fifty years on the east coast by the game of baseball, Bill ‘Spaceman’ Lee — sixth generation Californian and prodigal son has returned to his roots by making a monsterous red wine, like that which has run through his ancestors veins and vines since the 1800s.

“This wine will knock your Sox off.”

On the day of the promotion, December 22, Mr. Lee gave people tastes of his wine.  He came equipped with autographed baseball bats as well.

Michelle Guenard, right, pretends to attack Bill Lee with a bottle of the new Spaceman wine he has created, called Spaceman, while Ms. Maclure pretends to attack him with an autographed baseball bat.

Michelle Guenard, right, pretends to attack Bill Lee with a bottle of the new Spaceman wine he has created, called Spaceman, while Ms. Maclure pretends to attack him with an autographed baseball bat.

Michelle Guenard, creator of Michelle’s Spicy Kimchi, came by with a Red Sox jersey, and before long, she and Ms. Maclure were posing for photos on Santa’s lap and pretending to attack him with wine bottles and an autographed bat.

Ms. Maclure added another incentive for people to donate:  Anyone who brought in a toy would be entered to win one pizza a month for a year.

It worked.

As the musicians were packing up on the afternoon of December 22, Ms. Maclure said the event had helped fill up the Toys for Tots box.

contact Bethany M. Dunbar at bethany@bartonchronicle.com

For more free articles from the Chronicle like this one, see our Featuring pages. For all the Chronicle’s stories, pick up a print copy or subscribe, either for print or digital  editions.

Share

Summertime 2012

Some of our favorite images of summer 2012 in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont:

air show web2

Stunts at the air show at the Newport State Airport. Photo by Joseph Gresser

B&P web

Bread and Puppet Theater brings up the rear of a terrific Independence Day parade in Barton. Photo by Tena Starr

crafts lyn web

Lynn Berard of Barton sold her watercolors at the Crafts of the Lake Region craft show July 28 to benefit the Barton Public Library. Photo by Tena Starr

glover bikes web

Reed Olsen (259), of Barton, got off to a fast start in the 2012 edition of the Tour de Glover on Saturday, July 28, but not fast enough to capture first place. His time of 55 minutes 39 seconds was bettered by a slim five seconds by Hartford, Connecticut, rider Brendan Mahoney. The Tour de Glover is one of the signature events that mark Glover Day. Glover Day, the last Saturday of July each year, is a town-wide celebration of community to benefit volunteer organizations. Photo by Joseph Gresser

maclure craftsbury web

Emily Maclure, who grew up in Orleans, is the new owner of the Craftsbury General Store. Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

newport taste web

Katie Levasseur, Ms. Vermont 2011, at left, stands with Newport City Renaissance Corporation director Patricia Sears during Taste of Newport festivities in June 2012. Photo by Joseph Gresser

relay spongebob web

Robert Tanguay (left) as SpongeBob Squarepants, and his teammate Lance Wells walked in the Relay for Life fundraiser to fight cancer in Newport June 23 and 24. Photo by Richard Creaser

rose in rain web

Rain on a rose in West Glover. Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

shumlin cone web

Governor Peter Shumlin cools off with an ice cream cone as Jamie Michaud of Kingdom Creamery in Hardwick and his wife, Leslie, stand by. Photo by Joseph Gresser

trail ride web

Twenty-six horses and riders took to the trails for the Rhonda Libby Memorial Trail Ride to benefit the Pope Memorial Frontier Animal Shelter on the CCC trails at the south end of Lake Willoughby. Pictured above, from left to right, are: Deb Libby, Rhonda Libby’s sister, riding Rose; Connie Knaggs, shelter manager, riding Hameed; and Cindy Libby, Rhonda's sister-in-law, riding Lena. Photo by Brianne Nichols.

Stunts at the air show at the Newport State Airport.  Photo by Joseph GresserBread and Puppet Theater brings up the rear of a terrific Independence Day parade in Barton.  Photo by Tena StarrLynn Berard of Barton sold her watercolors at the Crafts of the Lake Region craft show July 28 to benefit the Barton Public Library.  Photo by Tena StarrReed Olsen (259), of Barton, got off to a fast start in the 2012 edition of the Tour de Glover on Saturday, July 28, but not fast enough to capture first place.  His time of 55 minutes 39 seconds was bettered by a slim five seconds by Hartford, Connecticut, rider Brendan Mahoney.  The Tour de Glover is one of the signature events that mark Glover Day.  Glover Day, the last Saturday of July each year, is a town-wide celebration of community to benefit volunteer organizations.  Photo by Joseph GresserEmily Maclure, who grew up in Orleans, is the new owner of the Craftsbury General Store. Photo by Bethany M. DunbarKatie Levasseur, Ms. Vermont 2011, at left, stands with Newport City Renaissance Corporation director Patricia Sears during Taste of Newport festivities in June 2012.  Photo by Joseph GresserRobert Tanguay (left) as SpongeBob Squarepants, and his teammate Lance Wells walked in the Relay for Life fundraiser to fight cancer in Newport June 23 and 24.  Photo by Richard CreaserRain on a rose in West Glover. Photo by Bethany M. DunbarGovernor Peter Shumlin cools off with an ice cream cone as Jamie Michaud of Kingdom Creamery in Hardwick and his wife, Leslie, stand by.  Photo by Joseph GresserTwenty-six horses and riders took to the trails for the Rhonda Libby Memorial Trail Ride to benefit the Pope Memorial Frontier Animal Shelter on the CCC trails at the south end of Lake Willoughby. Pictured above, from left to right, are:  Deb Libby, Rhonda Libby’s sister, riding Rose; Connie Knaggs, shelter manager, riding Hameed; and Cindy Libby, Rhonda's sister-in-law, riding Lena.  Photo by Brianne Nichols.
Share