Antiques and Uniques July 11

 

In Craftsbury, Saturday, this customer is seen through a stained-glass window, handcrafted by Joe Arborio, during the Antiques & Uniques Festival in 2014.  Photo by David Dudley

In Craftsbury, Saturday, this customer is seen through a stained-glass window, handcrafted by Joe Arborio, during the Antiques & Uniques Festival in 2014. Photo by David Dudley

The forty-fifth annual Antiques and Uniques Festival on Craftsbury Common will be held on Saturday, July 11, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The event is free of charge and open to all. The $5 parking donation goes to the Craftsbury Fire Department. This tented event is rain or shine with seating for seniors and games for children.

Festival goers of all ages come to enjoy shopping for antiques and Vermont crafts, sampling local and artisan food and drink, and picnicing outside of the barbecue tent — all of this to a live folk and fiddle musical backdrop.

With over 100 antiques dealers, Vermont craft vendors, and local specialty foods vendors, the crowd of shoppers easily draws thousands. And the demand for the local foods barbecue is something to be impressed by. With 95 percent of its food coming from within a 15-mile radius of Craftsbury, the barbecue tent is a splendiferous feast. Local grass-fed beef from Sawmill Brook Farm, organic sausages from LeBlanc Family Farm, Vermont Smoke and Cure hot dogs, Pete’s Greens’ organic greens, fresh eggs from Still Meadow Farm, and healthy vegan hummus wraps made by the Craftsbury General Store are just some of the foods available. The Cellars at Jasper Hill has been generous with the festival both in donated money and with donated product. The festival gladly tops their burgers and vegetable wraps with their world award-winning cheese.

The Antiques and Uniques Festival has been held the second Saturday in July every year since 1971 on Craftsbury Common.

The town of Craftsbury decided that it’s going to take a village to continue the festival tradition and therefore the entire village should benefit from it. Here’s how it works: Individuals who wish to volunteer for Antiques and Uniques keep track of the work hours they accumulate and choose a Craftsbury nonprofit or organization that they wish to represent. At the end of the event, all proceeds are distributed to the various organizations. This means that the entire town benefits from the festival because of the generosity of the volunteering patrons.

In a society where it’s so easy to throw things away and replace with the newer, faster and better, concepts like appreciating the “old” or “outdated” can seem ridiculous — but not when one slows down enough to explore the rare beauty and individuality of true craftsmanship. When one walks the green of Craftsbury Common and examines the vendors’ antiques and the crafters’ one-of-a-kind pieces, a feeling of awe arises.

For more information, visit townofcraftsbury.com or e-mail AntiquesAndUniquesVT@gmail.com or call (802) 777-8527. — submitted by Anne-Marie Keppel.

For more things to do, see Things to Do in the Northeast Kingdom.

Share

On Craftsbury Common: Candlelight vigil held for victims of police violence

Featured

Julie Lou Lepping, a student at Sterling College, organized a candlelight vigil Sunday to protest recent police violence in Missouri and New York.  “I felt so angry and confused by the injustices being done to people of color in America,” Ms. Lepping said.  “I felt I had to do something.  How can you not?”   Photo by David Dudley

Julie Lou Lepping, a student at Sterling College, organized a candlelight vigil Sunday to protest recent police violence in Missouri and New York. “I felt so angry and confused by the injustices being done to people of color in America,” Ms. Lepping said. “I felt I had to do something. How can you not?” Photo by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle December 10, 2014

by David Dudley

CRAFTSBURY — Roughly 40 people gathered on Craftsbury Common Sunday night to hold a candlelight vigil in response to police violence against black Americans.

Julia Lou Lepping, a student at Sterling College from Louisville, Kentucky, organized the vigil. As the 40 people, who all carried candles, filled the center of the snow-covered common, they formed a circle.

Though it was dark, and two degrees below zero, a full moon bathed the group in cool light.

Continue reading

Share

Is the postal service shooting itself in the foot?

Featured

The Post Office in Craftsbury Common has strange hours these days.  Residents say they are inconvenient, but the USPS says decreasing hours is the only way to keep some of these offices open. Photos by David Dudley

The Post Office in Craftsbury Common has strange hours these days. Residents say they are inconvenient, but the USPS says decreasing hours is the only way to keep some of these offices open. Photos by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle October 29, 2014

by David Dudley

In May of 2012 the United States Postal Service (USPS) implemented the Post Plan, which was devised to curb mounting debt, and prevent thousands of offices, many of them rural post offices, such as those in Greensboro Bend, Craftsbury Common, and Albany, from being shut down altogether. The USPS estimated that the plan would be up and running by September of 2014.

For many rural offices in Orleans County, the Post Plan means decreased window hours, which is affecting local businesses that depend on the Postal Service for shipping. Also, many employees have seen their hours cut, and people who work full-time are having trouble getting to the post office while it’s open.

Continue reading

Share