Bread and Puppet Theater’s museum turns 40

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Here, Elka Schumann, whose husband, Peter Schumann, founded the Bread and Puppet Theater, sits next to the museum guard, a wooden figurine.  Traditionally, he sleeps in a nightcap in his bed on the bench next to where Ms. Schumann is sitting all winter when the museum is closed, and is woken up each summer for the open house.  When he’s on duty he wears a cap.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Here, Elka Schumann, whose husband, Peter Schumann, founded the Bread and Puppet Theater, sits next to the museum guard, a wooden figurine. Traditionally, he sleeps in a nightcap in his bed on the bench next to where Ms. Schumann is sitting all winter when the museum is closed, and is woken up each summer for the open house. When he’s on duty he wears a cap. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle June 10, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

GLOVER — Visitors jammed the lanes around the Bread and Puppet Theater’s grounds here with their cars on Sunday when they came for the museum’s open house.

The theater celebrated the fortieth anniversary of its puppet museum on Sunday with shape note singing, harp music, and mini-plays scattered around the yard.

The smell of garlic from the aioli that was served with Bread and Puppet’s signature sourdough bread permeated the museum.

Visitors could wander through over 40 years worth of big puppets and peruse and purchase posters, pamphlets, and books.

Burt Porter, a Glover poet and musician who has participated in opening the museum yearly since its inception, was given a wooden medal….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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contact Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph at natgagjo@bartonchronicle.com

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At The Museum of Everyday Life:  the charms and trials of dust

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At great personal sacrifice, Linda Elbow refrained from cleaning her house for four months and put some of the results on display.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

At great personal sacrifice, Linda Elbow refrained from cleaning her house for four months and put some of the results on display. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 3, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

GLOVER — The Museum of Everyday Life, located in a retired dairy barn just off Route 16 south of Glover Village, opened its fifth season Sunday afternoon in the kind of damp weather that represses the subject of its new exhibit—dust.

In previous years the museum looked through its skewed lens at common items that generally have to be bought — pencils, matches, safety pins, and toothbrushes. Dust is with us whether we like it or not, and the museum’s chief curator, Clare Dolan, offers visitors a chance to examine a multitude of its many aspects.

Samples of coal dust, sawdust, grain dust, and gold dust were elegantly presented under a series of bell jars, along with detailed descriptions of the hazards or benefits each represents….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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contact Joseph Gresser at joseph@bartonchronicle.com

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In Glover: What you never knew about the toothbrush

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Clare Dolan, the guiding intelligence of the Museum of Everyday Life, stands outside of her young institution alongside a giant toothbrush built by Newark artist Martin McGowan.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Clare Dolan, the guiding intelligence of the Museum of Everyday Life, stands outside of her young institution alongside a giant toothbrush built by Newark artist Martin McGowan. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 25, 2014

by Joseph Gresser

GLOVER — The word “everyday” means usual or common. It might seem, then, that the Museum of Everyday Life would be a humdrum collection of boring objects. The selection of themes covered in the museum’s four-year history — matches, safety pins, pencils, and, now, toothbrushes — might do nothing to change that view.

A visit to the museum, though, quickly upends any such preconception. Curator Clare Dolan has filled an old dairy barn with a collection of exhibits that uses dental hygiene alone as a lens through which to view the world.

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