Shop Small, Shop Local kicks off November 29

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WEB newport christmas

Santa visits Newport’s Main Street. Photo by Joseph Gresser

Cities may have Black Friday for one day, but Newport merchants answer that with a promotion of their own: Small Business Week. Many area retail stores will be offering incentives and discounts during this Shop Small, Shop Local week, from Saturday, November 29, to Saturday, December 6. Merchants and restaurants throughout Newport are planning this event, designed to kick off the big holiday shopping season locally.

In addition to the savings, shoppers can enter to win prizes from local businesses when they stop in and shop locally. Prizes will be awarded on December 6 during the Newport Santa Festival. Details about the Santa Festival can be found at www.newportlive.com.

To make the Newport and Derby area more accessible and easy to shop, Rural Community Transportation (RCT) will be offering a special, free bus route on the first day of Small Business Week, November 29, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., between Main Street in Newport to Country Thyme and Jed’s Maple in Derby. Busses will stop at retail shops along that route, running on the half-hour.

The important contributions small businesses make to their communities is recognized by Newport City Renaissance Corporation and Vermont’s North Country Chamber of Commerce, who are jointly promoting the Shop Small, Shop Local campaign. The promotion is designed to encourage Northeast Kingdom residents to support independent businesses in the Newport area by doing their holiday shopping within the community.

As part of the weeklong promotion, local businesses will be giving away Shop Small gifts, such as tote bags, buttons, and balloons, while supplies last.

For more information about Shop Small, Shop Local, visit www.discovernewportvt.com. — from the Newport City Renaissance Corporation.

For more things to do, see Things to Do in the Northeast Kingdom.

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Ruminations: Start a new tradition with Christmas cookies

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Some of our Christmas cookies from a previous year.  Clockwise from the bottom center, are:  Cuccidati, or Italian fig cookies; pizzelle; almond cookies (recipe not provided here); merenguitos; and more pizzelle.  Photo courtesy of Natalie Hormilla

Some of our Christmas cookies from a previous year. Clockwise from the bottom center, are: Cuccidati, or Italian fig cookies; pizzelle; almond cookies (recipe not provided here); merenguitos; and more pizzelle. Photo courtesy of Natalie Hormilla

copyright the Chronicle December 11, 2013

by Natalie Hormilla

Some years ago, when we got tired of too many Christmas gifts with too little meaning, we started to give away Christmas cookies.

The whole process is beautiful.  We bake together, listen to Christmas tunes, talk about the people we’ll give them to, sip amaretto, and just hang out as a family.

The best part is giving them.  The cookies we make for Christmas make their appearance just once a year.  They have a way of inspiring talk about those past family members who carried the recipes into the present.

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In Newport: Merchants get creative to compete with Internet

At All About Home in Derby, Cindy Moylan stocks high-end merchandise and matches online prices.  The strategy brings in business, but leaves her with a limited profit margin and makes it hard to add staff for the store, she said.  Photos by Joseph Gresser

At All About Home in Derby, Cindy Moylan stocks high-end merchandise and matches online prices. The strategy brings in business, but leaves her with a limited profit margin and makes it hard to add staff for the store, she said. Photos by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle December 4, 2013

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — A random sampling of local merchants suggests they are experimenting with new ways to compete in what has become a global marketplace.
The beginning of the 2013 Christmas shopping season looked pretty good, they said, but they are all looking over their shoulders at their real competition — the Internet.

Like most of the other storeowners, Cindy Moylan of All About Home in Derby, said she faces stiff competition from online retailers such as Amazon.  Her solution is to match their discounted prices on an everyday basis.

“People are conscious about how they spend their money,” she said.

Ms. Moylan said her customers often come into the store looking for the kitchenware and appliances she stocks, and they’re armed with lists of the lowest prices available on the Internet.  Because she bases her prices on the lowest allowed by manufacturers, those informed shoppers know they’ve found a good deal, she said.

Although one might like to think people will be willing to part with a little extra money in order to support a local business, Ms. Moylan said most people just go with the lowest price.

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