Relay for Life: Over 400 join the fight against cancer

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The American Cancer Society’s Northeast Kingdom edition of Relay for Life took place in Newport on Saturday night.  Luminarias commemorating cancer victims and survivors were placed along the track at North Country Union High School and lit at nightfall.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

The American Cancer Society’s Northeast Kingdom edition of Relay for Life took place in Newport on Saturday night. Luminarias commemorating cancer victims and survivors were placed along the track at North Country Union High School and lit at nightfall. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 1, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT — The luminaria-lined track at North Country Union High School (NCUHS) was filled with people of all ages talking and laughing Saturday night as they walked to raise money to fight cancer.

Ice-filled kiddie pools at either end of the track kept water bottles cold so participants could rehydrate during their trek.

By Saturday morning 323 people had signed up for the American Cancer Society’s 12-hour Relay for Life in advance. In the evening, 89 more signed up in person, and others came to walk without signing in, or simply to buy a luminaria bag. The relay lasts all night.

People who are signed up are grouped into teams. Thirty-five teams raised…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Rasputitsa cyclists brave chilly weather and mud season

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A mass start heralded the beginning of the 47-mile Rasputitsa cycling race.  More than 350 racers began and ended the 47 mile race in downtown Newport on a cool Saturday morning in support of the Mary E. Wright Halo Foundation.

A mass start heralded the beginning of the 47-mile Rasputitsa cycling race. More than 350 racers began and ended the 47 mile race in downtown Newport on a cool Saturday morning in support of the Mary E. Wright Halo Foundation.   Photo by Richard Creaser

copyright the Chronicle April 23, 2014

by Richard Creaser

NEWPORT — Mud season is typically a time of year that Vermont residents have come to dread. For the 350 riders in Saturday’s Rasputitsa cycling event, however, mud season represented a challenge that begged to be accepted.

The lure of the Rasputitsa is one that finds its roots in the European Spring Classic bicycle races, co-organizer Heidi Myers told the Chronicle on Friday. The growth of gravel road racing nationally, coupled with the success of Ms. Myers’ and fellow co-organizer Anthony Moccia’s Dirty 40 race last August, led them to attempt a second race in the Northeast Kingdom. The fact that so many cyclists braved a blustery April morning and 47 miles of often treacherous back roads appears to have confirmed their belief in the sport’s popularity.

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