Local history buffs present work

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Pictured from left, Joan Alexander of the Glover Historical Society, writer Dolores E. Chamberlain, and Earl Randall of the Crystal Lake Falls Historical Association were the presenters on Monday night at a meeting on local history at the Barton library.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Pictured from left, Joan Alexander of the Glover Historical Society, writer Dolores E. Chamberlain, and Earl Randall of the Crystal Lake Falls Historical Association were the presenters on Monday night at a meeting on local history at the Barton library. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 22, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

BARTON — The area here changed drastically in the last century. Where Barton was a hub of activity, now the industry is gone and once-busy factory buildings are crumbling.

This was part of the focus of Earl Randall’s presentation on Barton’s history, which he gave at the library here on Monday. About ten people came to the meeting, to hear from different presenters about the stories, people, and general history of the area.

Mr. Randall, of the Crystal Lake Falls Historical Association, Joan Alexander of the Glover Historical Society, and writer Dolores E. Chamberlain presented the work they’ve done on the area to keep memories alive.

Mr. Randall brought old pictures of Barton and used a pointer to bring attention to different businesses that were once here, what happened to them, and what replaced them.

What made Barton the economic and social center of Orleans County were…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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In Barton: A mixed reaction to townwide yard sale

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Antiques and More was one of the many antique shops in Barton that did well at Barton’s townwide yard sale this year.  To other businesses, it was just another Saturday.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Antiques and More was one of the many antique shops in Barton that did well at Barton’s townwide yard sale this year. To other businesses, it was just another Saturday. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle July 1, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

BARTON — The townwide yard sale, started 20 years old with the hope of bringing people to Barton, certainly does that. Whether it also brings economic activity to local businesses likely depends on what they sell.

Saturday’s annual yard sale was a real boon for the antique shops in town, but other businesses didn’t report much, if any, economic benefit at all.

In a single sale, Village Treasures owner Leo McElroy made half of what he expected to make for the whole day.

But at the Circle K, James Marcy said the mini-mart actually lost money because it staffed extra for customers who didn’t arrive.

And at The Parson’s Corner restaurant, owner Dave Rath said…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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New eatery comes to Barton

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WEB eddie truck outsidecopyright the Chronicle June 24, 2015

by Natalie Hormilla

BARTON — Eddie Seadale’s newest food venture is operated out of a truck. Mr. Seadale, former owner of The Parson’s Corner restaurant, has set up the truck at the business he owns with his wife, Lori, River’s Edge Farmstand.

Mr. Seadale cooks and serves up a menu that’s made up on the fly — but he doesn’t seem even remotely worried about that.

“When Mom will say, Edward, I’m thinking of making this, I say, Great, because I know it’ll be good,” he said, zipping about his teeny kitchen Monday afternoon. “That’s how we roll.”

Mr. Seadale and his mother, Anne Seadale, are the duo behind the Copper Plate, which opened earlier this month. Mr. Seadale’s mother turns 83 in July, and the two have worked together before.

“We worked together in Southie at my first place.….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Historic Brick Kingdom bridges refurbished

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Dennis Walker blocked off the bridge near the Brick Kingdom buildings too.  Vehicles don’t have space to cross anymore because of the wooden frame built for that very purpose.  Pedestrians can cross safely on either side of the frame.  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Dennis Walker blocked off the bridge near the Brick Kingdom buildings too. Vehicles don’t have space to cross anymore because of the wooden frame built for that very purpose. Pedestrians can cross safely on either side of the frame. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle June 17, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

BARTON — Dennis Walker has temporarily repaired the two Brick Kingdom bridges here, making them safe for pedestrians.

The Barton Historical Society hired Mr. Walker to fix the bridges, which were rotting in some places.

“This is just a temporary fix so that pedestrians can still cross them and their vehicles won’t, because they need repair,” said Dottie Hathaway, director and secretary of the Barton Historic Society’s board.

The bridges are on Barton Historical Society land, which makes the organization responsible….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Barton Motors to be sold at auction

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The former Barton Motor Company property.  Photo by Tena Starr

The former Barton Motor Company property. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle May 13, 2015

by Tena Starr

BARTON — The Barton Motor Company, for many years a thriving Ford dealership, will go up for foreclosure auction on June 15.

Court papers say that Winston Harper, who once owned the company with his brother Woody Harper, is owed $434,802 in principle and interest. They also say that there are six federal tax liens on the property, amounting to a little over $103,000.

Woody Harper died in February, 15 years after he and his brother parted ways as co-owners of the company.

Winston Harper said their father bought the dealership and garage in 1958….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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The risks of renting

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Rose Warner found this pile of trash outside a trailer she and her husband, Vernon, rented in July.  They said they were paid only $300 rent over the course of several months, learned by accident that their tenant had left, and found the place a wreck.  Photo by Tena Starr

Rose Warner found this pile of trash outside a trailer she and her husband, Vernon, rented in July. They said they were paid only $300 rent over the course of several months, learned by accident that their tenant had left, and found the place a wreck. Photos by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle April 15, 2015

by Tena Starr

In July of 2014, Vernon and Rose Warner rented a trailer in Lowell to a man and his son. They say they received $300 at the time, and nothing since. The monthly rent was $550.

Now, the tenant is gone, which the Warners discovered by accident.

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the Chronicle changes hands

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A solid reminder of how we used to operate — an old manual typewriter — sits in a corner of the Chronicle office.  The hat belonged to Anna Baker, the artist responsible for the Chronicle cows, and on the wall behind it is a copy of the original flyer announcing the start of a new newspaper, the Chronicle.  Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

A solid reminder of how we used to operate — an old manual typewriter — sits in a corner of the Chronicle office. The hat belonged to Anna Baker, the artist responsible for the Chronicle cows, and on the wall behind it is a copy of the original flyer announcing the start of a new newspaper, the Chronicle. Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

copyright the Chronicle February 4, 2015

by Chris Braithwaite

To me the Chronicle will always be a novelty — a shot in the dark, a crazy gamble undertaken with almost no money but all the energy a 30-year-old immigrant could summon in himself, his wife, and a handful of friends.

But more than half the people living in Orleans County today had a Chronicle to read when they were old enough to read anything. And when my mind wanders up and down the streets of Barton Village, I can’t find a business that has been around, under continuous ownership, any longer than the Chronicle.

Those are hardly the trappings of a novelty. And at 70, I am a long way from the youngster who set out to see if small-town weekly journalism could be as complex, as challenging, as rewarding as the big-city journalism he’d left behind four years before.

After four decades I can report the result of that experiment. The stories I’ve encountered have been every bit as complex, and just as “good” — in the hard-eyed way that reporters evaluate their raw material — as the stories any reporter covers, anywhere.

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Pete Cocoros’ trumpet takes him from Brooklyn to Barton, the long way

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Pete Cocoros, veteran, trumpeter, and photographer, plays “Taps” in Glover on Memorial Day, 2013.  Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

Pete Cocoros, veteran, trumpeter, and photographer, plays “Taps” in Glover on Memorial Day, 2013. Photo by Bethany M. Dunbar

copyright the Chronicle December 23, 2014

by Joseph Gresser

BARTON — As he hears a visitor pull into the dooryard of his camp, only a stone’s throw from Crystal Lake, Pete Cocoros pokes the bell of his trumpet out his door and blows a fanfare. It proves to be an apt prelude to a two-hour conversation about music and the adventurous path blazed by a horn.

Mr. Cocoros has performed for generals, played before thousands at Radio City Music Hall in New York City, entertained troops in Iceland, Morocco, and Greece, and set people to dancing all over the United States.

Most people who know him these days think of Pete Cocoros as the man whose playing of “Taps” brings tears to the eyes of those gathered to celebrate Veterans and Memorial days in Barton. Or they know him as the man whose photographs of local school band concerts appear in the Chronicle a few times a year.

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Sargent opens World Cup season with personal best

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Ida Sargent of Barton opened her third World Cup season with a personal record.  Photo courtesy of Dave and Lindy Sargent

Ida Sargent of Barton opened her third World Cup season with a personal record. Photo courtesy of Dave and Lindy Sargent

copyright the Chronicle December 3, 2014

U.S. Ski Team member Ida Sargent of Barton started off her third World Cup season on opening day November 29 with a personal best — she came in fifth among a field of 73 women in a classic sprint. She ranked top for the U.S. in the 1.4-kilometer race, held in Ruka, Finland.

She once came in sixth place in Sochi, Russia, the year before the Olympics, said Ms. Sargent’s mother, Lindy Sargent, in a brief telephone interview Monday.

“But this was her top score. She hasn’t ever gotten a fifth place,” Ms. Sargent said.

The next day wasn’t as amazing. Ms. Sargent came in fifty-first place in a ten-kilometer classic race on November 30, with a time of 28:52.8, nearly 96 minutes behind the top racer. Ms. Sargent was third for the U.S. in that race, which was also held in Ruka.

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Ted Hoagland publishes twenty-fourth book

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WEB hoagland devil covercopyright the Chronicle October 1, 2014

Reviewed by Natalie Hormilla

The Devil’s Tub, by Edward Hoagland. 240 pages. Hardcover. Published by Arcade Publishing. $24.95.

BARTON — “I’m ready to die,” said Edward Hoagland while seated comfortably in his longtime summer home in Barton. “I’d be totally content if I died tomorrow.”

Mr. Hoagland said this without a single degree of suicidal tendency. He means that he’s a writer who is content with his life’s work.

If he did die tomorrow, he’d miss the reviews, he said, with a laugh.

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