Independence Day celebrations

Fireworks from the Independence Day celebrations in Barton in 2011.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Fireworks from the Independence Day celebrations in Barton in 2011. Photo by Joseph Gresser

Barton

The parade begins at 2 p.m. on Main Street on Saturday, July 4, with a theme of “Seventieth anniversary end to World War II.” The parade route ends at the fairgrounds, where awards will be given in front of the grandstands around 3 p.m.

Fireworks will be at the fairgrounds at dusk, with no cost to enter after 4 p.m.

Roaring Brook Park

Activities will be held on Saturday, July 4, all day at Roaring Brook Park, home of the Orleans County Fairgrounds. Gates open at 9 a.m., admission is $7; kids under ten are free. Parking is free. The day’s events include an antique and farm stock tractor pull beginning at 9 a.m., a gymkhana horse show at noon, a horse and pony pull at 10 a.m., a horseshoe tournament at 10 a.m., a professional lumberjack roundup at 10 a.m., and the Walbridge family lawn mower and ATV pull at 10 a.m.

There will also be a $2 bounce house for kids, slides from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., face-painting, ice cream, a chicken barbecue, food booths, and more.

Fireworks by the Barton Fire Department will be at dusk. Free admission to the fairgrounds after 4 p.m.

Newport

The Harry Corrow Freedom Run begins at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, July 4, on the bike path in the pines of Prouty Beach. Walkers are welcome. Course choices are a ten-mile, 10K, 5K, or one-mile fun run. Ten percent of all registration fees will go to the Gardner Park Restoration Project and the Memphremagog Ski Touring Foundation. The fee for adults doing a course of ten miles or more is $50; fewer than ten miles is $35. Youth are 50 percent off. Register at dandelionrun.org/2015-harry-corrow-php. Light lunch to follow.

Events at Gardner Memorial Park begin at 3 p.m. with music by the Session Guys. The annual bed races begin at 5 p.m. Anyone interested in registering should contact Andy Cappello of Newport Parks and Recreation at 334-6345.

The Hitmen will play at 7 p.m. The international hula hoop competition begins at 8 p.m. People should bring their own hula hoops. The band Soul Kingdom will play at 8:30 p.m.

Fireworks will fly at 9:45 p.m.

There will be all kinds of food vendors at the park throughout the day, and kayaks will be available to rent at the park from 3 p.m. until dusk.

Greensboro

Fireworks will be at dusk on Friday, July 3, let off on Lake Shore Road, near the ballfield.

The parade is on Saturday, July 4. The lineup starts at around 9:15 a.m., with lineup both at the new fire station and on Lake Shore Road. Anyone is welcome to participate and should just show up. The parade starts promptly at 10 a.m., and ends at the town green where there will be a band, children’s activities, and games.

Also at the town green on July 4, under the tent, there will be a square dance, sponsored by the Greensboro Arts Alliance and Residency, from 7 to 9 p.m. The caller will be Robin Russell, with music by Pete’s Posse. Admission is $5; children under 12 are free. There will also be ice cream, hot dogs, and more.

The Greensboro United Church of Christ will hold its annual chicken barbecue on Saturday, July 4, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Reservations can be made ahead of time. The price remains the same at $10 for a generous plate of barbecue chicken, vinaigrette coleslaw, a roll, beverage, and dessert. Proceeds from this event benefit the work of the church. The barbecue starts immediately after the parade behind the church. Reservations are accepted by e-mail at greensborochurch@gmail.com. Reservations are not considered confirmed unless an e-mail confirmation is sent. Reservations may also be made by calling 533-2223. There are a limited number of meals, so reservations are recommended.

Also, the Greensboro Free Library will hold its annual book sale on July 4, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Westmore

The annual pancake breakfast at the Westmore Fellowship Hall is from 8:30 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, July 4. The menu includes homemade pancakes, Vermont fancy maple syrup, scrambled eggs, ham, and coffee and juice. Donations of $8 for adults, and less for children, according to age, go to the Westmore Community Church Youth Camp Scholarship Fund.

The sixteenth annual Willoughby Boat Parade will be on Saturday, July 4, with “Cartoons on Parade” as the theme. Participants should decorate their boat, canoe, or kayak depicting their favorite Vermont moment. The first-place winners will receive a trophy and $50. The second- and third-place winners get trophies. To be eligible for a prize, boats must be at the starting point by 3:30 p.m. to register and receive a number used by the judges for identification. To pre-register, or for more information, call 673-2043, or e-mail doreenallen64@yahoo.com. Boats entered in the parade will meet off Crescent Beach, on the west side of the lake, at 3:30 p.m. The parade will proceed north along the west shore, cross the north beach, and travel south along the east shore, ending at Trails End, where the winners will be announced. There is no rain date.

The annual Willoughby Lake 5K run and walk will be held on Sunday, July 5, to benefit the Westmore Ladies Aid Scholarship Fund. Doors to the Westmore Community Hall will open at 9 a.m., with the race beginning at 11 a.m. For questions, or to pre-register, call Gail Robitaille at 525-3689.

Derby

The parade will be on Saturday, July 4, starting at 10 a.m. at the Elks Club. It will go down Main Street, past North Country Union Junior High School (NCUJHS) and people can stop at the Nelsons’ barnyard or circle back around to the Elks. There will be a flea market and barbecue in front of NCUJHS. The Boy Scouts will sell food, including hot dogs and hamburgers. There will also be a bounce house. The food will be served starting around 11:30 a.m., and events will continue until around 3 or 4 p.m.

To enter a float in the parade, contact Kurt Brainard at 766-5588.

Island Pond

The weekend’s events kick off on Friday, July 3, with Classic Rewind playing at Pavilion Park, part of Friday Night Live, which runs from 6 to 10 p.m. There will also be a barbecue, local vendors, and a fireworks extravaganza at dusk. The rain date for fireworks is Saturday, July 11.

The parade will be on Saturday, July 4, at 11 a.m. To enter a float in the parade, call Melinda Lamoureux at 723-6130. There will be pony rides behind the Municipal Building from 12 to 3 p.m., and a duck race at 1 p.m., with prizes of $500, $100, and $75. Participants can buy ducks at the Island Pond Welcome Center, Gervais Ace Hardware, Passumpsic Savings Bank, and other participating merchants. For more information, call Jeanne at 723-6138. There is also a townwide scavenger hunt on Saturday, from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m., that starts and ends at the Welcome Center. For more information, call Mike or Tim at 723-0470. At 2 p.m., there will be a boat parade. For more information, call Nate at 723-4218. On Saturday night, the Adams Band will play at Pavilion Park from 6 to 10 p.m.

The cardboard boat race will be on Sunday, July 5, at noon. Allowed materials include cardboard, duct or masking tape, liquid nails, adhesive, latex, paint, and varnish. No flex seal or plastic sheeting. For more information, call Jeanne at 723-6138.

North Troy

The parade will be on Saturday, July 4, starting from the old mill at 11 a.m. The parade will march right up Main Street, down to the American Legion Post #28 home. The legion hopes that children will get involved and decorate their bikes. Old cars and floats are also welcome. Set up for the parade will be around 10 or 10:30 a.m. There will be a chicken barbecue at noon at the legion, with a donation required.

Craftsbury

The Craftsbury Village block party will be from 5 p.m. to dark on Friday, July 3, featuring free barbecue and games for the whole family, and live music from the Eames Brothers, the Craftsbury Chamber Players, and DJ Vu. Fireworks by Andrew Johnson will go off at dusk. The street will be closed between Cemetery and the Creek roads.

For more things to do, see Things to Do in the Northeast Kingdom.

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Antiques and Uniques July 11

 

In Craftsbury, Saturday, this customer is seen through a stained-glass window, handcrafted by Joe Arborio, during the Antiques & Uniques Festival in 2014.  Photo by David Dudley

In Craftsbury, Saturday, this customer is seen through a stained-glass window, handcrafted by Joe Arborio, during the Antiques & Uniques Festival in 2014. Photo by David Dudley

The forty-fifth annual Antiques and Uniques Festival on Craftsbury Common will be held on Saturday, July 11, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The event is free of charge and open to all. The $5 parking donation goes to the Craftsbury Fire Department. This tented event is rain or shine with seating for seniors and games for children.

Festival goers of all ages come to enjoy shopping for antiques and Vermont crafts, sampling local and artisan food and drink, and picnicing outside of the barbecue tent — all of this to a live folk and fiddle musical backdrop.

With over 100 antiques dealers, Vermont craft vendors, and local specialty foods vendors, the crowd of shoppers easily draws thousands. And the demand for the local foods barbecue is something to be impressed by. With 95 percent of its food coming from within a 15-mile radius of Craftsbury, the barbecue tent is a splendiferous feast. Local grass-fed beef from Sawmill Brook Farm, organic sausages from LeBlanc Family Farm, Vermont Smoke and Cure hot dogs, Pete’s Greens’ organic greens, fresh eggs from Still Meadow Farm, and healthy vegan hummus wraps made by the Craftsbury General Store are just some of the foods available. The Cellars at Jasper Hill has been generous with the festival both in donated money and with donated product. The festival gladly tops their burgers and vegetable wraps with their world award-winning cheese.

The Antiques and Uniques Festival has been held the second Saturday in July every year since 1971 on Craftsbury Common.

The town of Craftsbury decided that it’s going to take a village to continue the festival tradition and therefore the entire village should benefit from it. Here’s how it works: Individuals who wish to volunteer for Antiques and Uniques keep track of the work hours they accumulate and choose a Craftsbury nonprofit or organization that they wish to represent. At the end of the event, all proceeds are distributed to the various organizations. This means that the entire town benefits from the festival because of the generosity of the volunteering patrons.

In a society where it’s so easy to throw things away and replace with the newer, faster and better, concepts like appreciating the “old” or “outdated” can seem ridiculous — but not when one slows down enough to explore the rare beauty and individuality of true craftsmanship. When one walks the green of Craftsbury Common and examines the vendors’ antiques and the crafters’ one-of-a-kind pieces, a feeling of awe arises.

For more information, visit townofcraftsbury.com or e-mail AntiquesAndUniquesVT@gmail.com or call (802) 777-8527. — submitted by Anne-Marie Keppel.

For more things to do, see Things to Do in the Northeast Kingdom.

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Buy fresh produce this fall through SNAP

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Photo by Joseph Gresser

Photo by Joseph Gresser

Vermont Harvest, a new program piloted by Green Mountain Farm-to-School (GMFTS), will allow families receiving federal SNAP benefits, known in Vermont as 3SquaresVT, to purchase $75 worth of fresh fruits and vegetables at local Northeast Kingdom grocery stores.

The primary goal of the program is to increase the purchase of fresh fruits and vegetables by low-income consumers participating in SNAP by providing incentives at the following retail locations: C&C Supermarket in Barton, Ray’s Market in Irasburg, Craftsbury General Store in Craftsbury, and Vista Foods in Newport.

Beginning in August, SNAP participant households in Orleans and Essex counties will receive information about the program and instructions for redeeming their coupons, which will arrive beginning in September and remain valid through February 2016.

Continue reading

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North Branch Trail now open to public

Pictured, from back to front, are:  Kyle Bunnell, Ethan Vaniere, Maylynda Fairgrieve, and Eric Howarth.  Photo courtesy of the Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge — Nulhegan Basin Division

Pictured, from back to front, are: Kyle Bunnell, Ethan Vaniere, Maylynda Fairgrieve, and Eric Howarth. Photo courtesy of the Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge — Nulhegan Basin Division

The Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge — Nulhegan Basin Division announces that the North Branch Trail has been completed and is now available for public use.

The four-mile loop trail is accessed from a parking area along Route 105 in Ferdinand, approximately one-half mile west of the railroad crossing.  It’s expected that the trail will enhance opportunities for bird watching, environmental education outings by school children, and especially fishing — with improved access to the North Branch of the Nulhegan River, a high quality cold-water stream.  In addition, the parking area will be plowed during winter to allow access for snowshoeing and cross-country skiing, opportunities that are currently lacking on the refuge due to the limited number of access points available to pedestrians during winter.

The rustic trail was constructed during the past two summers by the Nulhegan Basin Division’s Youth Conservation Corps crew, with special assistance from Conservation Corps staff from NorthWoods Stewardship Center in East Charleston.

The new trail and all the division’s lands are open to the public year-round.  Maps and other orientation materials are available at entry kiosks and at the visitor contact station in Brunswick.  — from the United States Department of the Interior.

For more things to do, check out our events section.

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Rifle season for white-tailed deer opens November 16

deer menard web

The weekend before rifle season is set aside for youth hunters. Noah Menard of Barton poses proudly with the spikehorn he shot Sunday, November 10, in Barton. He and his father, Nathan, stopped by the Chronicle for a photo before having the deer weighed, but his first buck, taken at a distance of 55 yards, was big enough to put a smile on the eight-year-old’s face. Photo by Joseph Gresser

by Paul Lefebvre

copyright the Chronicle 11-13-2013

Why do deer hunters enjoy less success in the Northeast Kingdom than they do elsewhere?

The 2013 deer rifle season opens Saturday, and the Department of Fish and Wildlife is projecting a harvest similar to 2012 when rifle hunters took 6,159 buck over the 16-day season.

Adam Murkowski, the department’s top deer biologist, said he expects that 16 percent of the state’s deer population will be harvested.  He estimated the herd’s present population at roughly 130,000, and noted that the harvest rate has been stable for the last few years. Continue reading

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Memphremagog Ski Touring Foundation trails

The Memphremagog Ski Touring Foundation is a nonprofit corporation with a mission to create and promote a system of high quality ski and snowshoe trails in the Derby-Newport area.

MSTF trails vary from railroad flat to precipitous, with skate and classic machine grooming on the core network.

MSTF is made possible by volunteer efforts, many generous landowners, and contributions from users. We hope to see you out on the snow and hope you will support MSTF with your membership!

Tickets and maps are available at IROC, at the MSTF Barn, and at the Southern Trail entrance off the Derby Recreation Path.  Trailhead parking includes MSTF lot near the Barn, IROC, the North Country Union High School land lab on the Quarry Rd, North Country Hospital and along Lakemont Rd adjacent to the bike path. After school hours, Derby Elementary also has a trailhead.

The cost is not expensive. An individual daypass is just $5 and a family season pass is just $35.  For more information, see www.mstf.net/ find the group on facebook,or e-mail Peter Harris at: PLHarris969@comcast.net.

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A birdwatcher’s challenge: find 100 species of birds in one day in the Northeast Kingdom

A Blackburnian Warbler. Photo by Bob Stymeist

by Martha Steele

copyright the Chronicle July 18, 2012

Ruth Gjessing, my mother, has lived in Westmore for over 30 years.  Although she and I both grew up in Burlington, neither of us knew much about the Northeast Kingdom before she married Erland Gjessing in 1969.  I vividly recall my first trip to his property in Westmore.  We were driving from the north on Route 5A, when Lake Willoughby, framed by the cliffs of Pisgah and Hor, came into view.  It literally took my breath away; I had never realized Vermont had such a stunning and majestic lake.

These days, my husband, Bob Stymeist, and I spend a lot of time year-round peregrinating throughout the Northeast Kingdom, particularly Orleans County, in search of birds.  By far, the best time for birding in the Kingdom is May and June, the time when migratory birds return to breed and are in full song, establishing their territories and finding their mates.

Arguably, the Northeast Kingdom is one of the better areas to bird in the lower 48 states during those two months.  Its combination of a northern latitude, boreal forest habitat, mountain peaks, and numerous small ponds, marshes, and lakes gives plenty of habitat for many breeding songbirds.  On our property alone in Westmore, over the past several years, we have recorded a total of 84 species of birds.

During our vacation this past June, we decided to do a Big Day for Orleans County to see if we could tally at least 100 species of birds in the county in one 24-hour period.  A birding “Big Day” requires some prior scouting to find birds that are relatively uncommon or restricted to certain habitats or areas.  They also require planning a route to maximize the chances of seeing as many bird species as possible.  We listened to weather reports and decided that our Big Day would be June 14.

A Hairy Woodpecker, spotted at Barr Hill Nature Preserve in Greensboro.

At 2:15 a.m. on that Thursday morning, we got up to get the coffee going and get ready to leave.  The first birds we heard in the darkness were an Ovenbird along our forest edge and a distant common loon from Lake Willoughby.  We left the house at about 3 a.m., headed for East Charleston near the NorthWoods Stewardship Center, where we heard Eastern Whip-poor-wills calling.  As the sky began to brighten, the dawn chorus along the fog-enshrouded Clyde River was nearly deafening:  Wilson’s Snipe, Alder Flycatcher, Warbling Vireo, Red-eyed Vireo, Winter Wren, Wood Thrush, American Robin, Veery, Gray Catbird, Common Yellowthroat, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Northern Waterthrush, Black-throated Warbler, Black-throated Green Warbler, Northern Parula, American Redstart, White-throated Sparrow, Indigo Bunting, Red-winged Blackbird, American Goldfinch, and more.  An Osprey was on its platform nest, and by 5:30 a.m., we had tallied 40 species.

We went on to the Newport area, headed for the Barton River and Coventry marshes.  These locations added such birds as Ring-necked Duck, Hooded Merganser, Pied-billed Grebe, Double-crested Cormorant, Great Blue Heron, Bald Eagle, Virginia Rail, Herring Gull, Ring-billed Gull, Chimney Swift, Belted Kingfisher, Marsh Wren, House Wren, Eastern Bluebird, Pine Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler, Savannah Sparrow, Northern Cardinal, Eastern Meadowlark, and Bobolink.  We then opted for a quick detour to the Coventry quarries where we picked up bank swallow and then headed back to Barton by way of Burton Hill Road, where we added cliff swallow and barn swallow in Irasburg.  In Barton, we stopped at the Randalls’ feeders on Breezy Hill Road to get what would be our only White-breasted Nuthatch of the day.  Earle Randall came out to greet us, but we were already heading out to the next stop (“Got our nuthatch, gotta go, see you later!”)

It was now time to return to the feeders and woods of our property in Westmore for a quick lunch and a few more species:  Ruffed Grouse, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Blue-headed Vireo, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Lincoln’s Sparrow, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Pine Siskin, and Purple Finch.  Our next stop was the Westmore Town Forest, where we added Canada Warbler, Magnolia Warbler, and Nashville Warbler.  It was now almost 2 p.m., and we were up to 92 species.

The problem, of course, is that as you get more species, there are fewer new ones to get.  We headed to the Barr Hill Nature Preserve in Greensboro, where we saw a few species that we still needed during our pre-Big Day scouting.  This small boreal jewel produced what we hoped for:  Golden-crowned Kinglet, Mourning Warbler, and Dark-eyed Junco.  An added bonus was finding a Northern Rough-winged Swallow cruising over Caspian Lake.

It was now about 6 p.m. and we had 96 species, just four short of our goal to reach 100.  We were missing some we thought surely we would get:  Wild Turkey, American Bittern, Broad-winged Hawk, Peregrine Falcon, Pileated Woodpecker, Hairy Woodpecker, and Scarlet Tanager.  We headed back to our property in Westmore, but had no luck along the way or back at the house.  As nightfall descended, we hoped our barred owl would call — not this night — or that there might still be calling American Woodcock in the field below us.  But after calling and displaying nightly since sometime in March, they too had quieted down.  So, the curtain came down at 96 species, and an exhausted pair hit the sack.

It was our first Big Day for Orleans County, and the experience has us already planning for next year.  In the 48 hours before and after our Big Day, we saw several species in Orleans County that we had not recorded on the Big Day, including Peregrine Falcon, at Jobs Pond and our property; Bicknell’s Thrush, Blackpoll Warbler, and Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, at Bald Mountain in Westmore; Broad-winged Hawk, Pileated Woodpecker, and Scarlet Tanager, on our property; Wild Turkey in Brownington; Swainson’s Thrush at Long Pond Road and Bald Mountain; and Hairy Woodpecker at Barr Hill Nature Preserve in Greensboro.  We also now know of other spots that we have yet to fully explore, such as the Bill Sladyk Wildlife Management Area in Holland or even the top of Jay Peak.

We may be crazy birders searching for any species we can find for no reason other than “it’s there to be done.”  But in the process, we are filled with joy in the pursuit and in the din of the familiar songs that greet us each spring for only some weeks before the songs are quieted as parents grow busy feeding their young.  The next time we go to Westmore this summer, we will hear far fewer birds, but we know they are there.  We know they will leave in the late summer and early fall, and we know they will return again next spring.  And this time, we’ll be ready.

A Chestnut-sided Warbler, spotted in East Charleston. Photo by Bob Stymeist

 

 

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Museum of Everyday Life opens with match stick exhibit

by Tena Starr
copyright June 1, 2011
GLOVER — There’s a theory, at least, that the first matches were invented by women in China while their city was under siege.  Since they couldn’t gather tinder and start fires in the usual way, they used what was at hand, which happened to be white phosphorous.
Thus, the match, which they called a “light-bearing slave.”
There were problems, however, with white phosphorous matches.  For instance, the people who made them were prone to coming down with “phossy jaw,” an infection of the jaw caused by exposure to phosphorous.  The disease started with toothaches and swollen gums and progressed to abcessed jawbones that had to be removed.  The affected bones would glow greenish-white in the dark.  Brain damage was also a symptom.  Victims were either grossly disfigured, or died.
Eventually, matchmakers (the literal type) moved to using red phosphorous, which doesn’t cause the disease.
Matches are one of those everyday items that most of us don’t give much thought to.
Clare Dolan, however, has thought about matches quite a lot.  She also thinks about safety pins, zippers, paper clips, and all kinds of other objects that
most of us consider so innocuous that their existence, much less their history, barely enters our minds.
This coming weekend Ms. Dolan’s Museum of Everyday Life, will open.  Don’t expect spectacle, but do expect to learn something, and to be entertained.
The initial exhibit will be called Fire! and will include at least some of the following:  The history of the match, sulfer and its properties, the international collection of things made from matchsticks, an X-rated collection of pornographic matchboxes (well, not exactly pornographic), portraits of the Glover Volunteer Fire Department, and the arson evidence collection.
Ms. Dolan is a nurse by profession.   She also works with the Bread and Puppet Theater, and involves herself in other ways in the arts.  About seven years ago, she bought a big old house on Route 16 in Glover.  It includes a barn, and that space opened up new artistic possibilities.
“I’m not really a farmer lady,” she said.  “I didn’t think about getting a lot of cows.  I just maybe thought about getting a donkey.
In fact, she does have a donkey.  His job is to mow the lawn, and he appears to be reasonably efficient at it.  Nancy the goat also lives there, but her function in life is more social — she’s the greeter.
Ms. Dolan said in an interview Sunday that she’s always been interested in collections and displaying objects.
“This just springs out of that interest,” she said.  “I take a lot of pleasure in everyday life objects.  Like, how did they invent the paperclip?  And batteries and matches and thimbles and zippers?”
Everything in Ms. Dolan’s museum is an object with a cost of $5 or less.  Not that she’s selling her displays; it’s just that she wants to stick to a celebration of the small, unglamorous and everyday.
The subject of her initial exhibition was a choice between safety pins and matches, she said, but she had more material on matches.  “Matches, like most everyday objects, have a lot of interesting history.”
There was, for instance, the evolution of the matchbook from the match box.  The matches in a box contained enough white phosphorous to kill someone.
“By scraping off the matches, people could kill themselves, and they did,” Ms. Dolan said.
Matchboxes and books were used for all sorts of endeavors.  For instance, Ms. Dolan acquired a bizarre collection of small matchboxes that show on their covers photographs of the Soviet dogs that went into space.
Beer companies used matchboxes in their advertising campaigns.
Matches were called lucifers and still are in some places.
And then there’s phillumeny — the hobby of collecting match-related ephemera, of which Ms. Dolan herself might be considered guilty, though she
might prefer pointing to some unknown fellow who was in the military and collected matchbooks from all over the West Coast, including Alaska.
“This guy spent a lot of time in nightclubs and dance halls,” she said, pointing to the collection of rather artistic matchbooks.  She noted that it’s possible to tell a lot about a person by what they choose to collect.
But the crown jewel of her match collection is likely an assortment of instruments — violins, a banjo, and a mandolin — built entirely of match sticks.  They were made by a man named Dale Brown who was in prison at the start of his unlikely and time-consuming project.
“He only had access to matches and white glue,” Ms. Dolan said.  “He stained them with coffee.”
The museum also includes the “Beastiary,” a whimsical zoo of creatures whose appearance is enhanced by the addition of matchsticks.
The museum will be open from 8 a.m. until 8 p.m. throughout the summer.  It’s self-service, meaning show up, turn the lights on, and turn them off when you leave.  Admission is free, but donations are welcome.
The museum’s official opening will be on Saturday, June 4.  It’s located on Route 16 south of Glover Village in the barn adjacent to a big yellow house.

contact Tena Starr at tena@bartonchronicle.com

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