Craftsbury Academy graduation: Lieutenant Governor was featured speaker

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Craftsbury graduates celebrate the end of their high school careers in a traditional fashion.   Photo by Joseph Gresser

Craftsbury graduates celebrate the end of their high school careers in a traditional fashion. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 17, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

CRAFTSBURY COMMON — Craftsbury Academy graduated a class of 17 students Friday, June 12.  Looking at her seniors seated near her on the stage in the school’s new gymnasium, Principal Merri Greenia smiled broadly as she made a clear political statement.

“When small schools work, they work best,” she said.

After a legislative session that placed the state’s smaller school districts squarely in the crosshairs of budget cutters, Ms. Greenia’s message was unmistakable.

And Craftsbury’s Class of 2015 had every right to feel pride in their school and their own accomplishments.  Almost half the graduating class was National Honor Society members….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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At the Lake Region graduation: “You can take the raccoon out of the wild, but….”

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As part of Lake Region Union High School’s graduation ceremony, graduates must give a white rose to someone who has stood by them in their journey.  Pictured here, MaKayla Baraw (right) gives a rose to her brother Hazen Baraw (left).  Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

As part of Lake Region Union High School’s graduation ceremony, graduates must give a white rose to someone who has stood by them in their journey. Pictured here, MaKayla Baraw (right) gives a rose to her brother Hazen Baraw (left). Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle June 17, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

The Lake Region Union High School Class of 2015 graduated on Sunday in a beautiful ceremony filled with parting advice, comedy, and music. There were 81 graduates.

Devin Royer gave the student address and compared the Class of 2015 to his pet raccoon. It was lovable, but sometimes you had to throw a laundry basket over it to control its wild side.

He looked towards the laughing teachers, who were seated to the right of the stage for confirmation that they sometimes wished they could have thrown a basket over this year’s graduating class.

He recalled advice teachers had given him. For example, cheating is like pregnancy.….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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World War II veterans gather on the anniversary of D-Day

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Joe Queenin of Derby Line holds up a Japanese flag, which was folded inside the helmet of the Japanese soldier he killed during the war.  The flag is covered with wishes for a safe return, hand-written by friends and family of the young soldier.   Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Joe Queenin of Derby Line holds up a Japanese flag, which was folded inside the helmet of the Japanese soldier he killed during the war. The flag is covered with wishes for a safe return, hand-written by friends and family of the young soldier. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle June 10, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

NEWPORT — They came walking upright, leaning on canes, or struggling with walkers, holding in their hands treasured memorabilia from over 70 years ago.  Seventeen World War II veterans — 16 men and one woman, ranging in age from their late eighties through mid-nineties — assembled at the Goodrich Memorial Library in Newport Saturday to mark the anniversary of the allied invasion of Normandy, France.

The event was organized and hosted by Scott Wheeler, owner and editor of Vermont’s Northland Journal, along with his wife, Penny, and daughter Emily. Over 60 people attended, including the veterans, their families, and members of the community.

“I came to mingle with the other vets and remember the occasion,” said 93-year-old Lindy Palin.  “I was reliving a few missions this morning….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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North Country graduates look to future

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Keenan Warner acknowledges his cheering section after receiving his diploma Saturday evening.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Keenan Warner acknowledges his cheering section after receiving his diploma Saturday evening. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle June 10, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

NEWPORT — Almost 200 seniors walked across the small stage put up in the North Country Union High School gymnasium Saturday evening, June 6. Each young man and woman received the document that marked a departure from a prescribed routine and the opening of the door to the future.

As is the custom at North Country, the ceremony was brief. Only an hour passed between the opening notes of Elgar’s “Pomp and Circumstance,” played in a stately manner by the school band, and the last bars of the piece played at a much brisker clip to suit the pace of the departing graduates.

In between, speakers praised the class of 2015 as a generous group of students, willing to give of their time and attention for the benefit of others.

North Country Principal Bill Rivard said….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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contact Joseph Gresser at joseph@bartonchronicle.com

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In Orleans: Fenton, 94, gets new medals

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Robert Fenton of Orleans shows off a row of medals reissued to him by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Mr. Fenton earned the medals over his years of service in World War II and the Korean War.  American Legion Post 23 presented him with the replacement medals to Mr. Fenton at Monday’s Memorial Day service in Orleans.   Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Robert Fenton of Orleans shows off a row of medals reissued to him by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Mr. Fenton earned the medals over his years of service in World War II and the Korean War. American Legion Post 23 presented him with the replacement medals to Mr. Fenton at Monday’s Memorial Day service in Orleans. Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle May 27, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

ORLEANS — Thirty years ago, Robert Fenton’s military medals went missing. The 94-year-old Mr. Fenton, who is from Orleans, is a veteran of both World War II and the Korean War.

On Monday, at a Memorial Day ceremony in Orleans, American Legion Post #23 presented Mr. Fenton with a duplicate set of medals, reissued by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

“I’m going to put ’em in the bank vault this time,” Mr. Fenton said happily a few minutes after the row of medals was pinned to his chest.

The medals were a U.S. Army Good Conduct Medal, a….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Peters still holds CDL at 95

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Bill Peters' children recently gave him a plaque, honoring him for possibly being the oldest man in Vermont who still holds a CDL.  He's 95, and was a longtime road commissioner in Albany.   Photo by Tena Starr

Bill Peters’ children recently gave him a plaque, honoring him for possibly being the oldest man in Vermont who still holds a CDL. He’s 95, and was a longtime road commissioner in Albany. Photo by Tena Starr

copyright the Chronicle May 27, 2015

by Tena Starr  

NORTH HYDE PARK — Former Albany Road Commissioner Bill Peters could well be the oldest man in Vermont who still holds a CDL. That’s a commercial driver’s license, which, among other things, allows a person to drive the big trucks that maintain town roads.

Mr. Peters’ children recently presented their father with a plaque that says: “Congratulations on being the oldest person we could find that still has a CDL and medical card in the state of Vermont. Turned 95 on March 31, 2015. We are proud of you.”

The plaque was the idea of Mr. Peters’ son Donald.

He said he was out shoveling snow in March and thought, what do you get a man who’s 95?….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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contact Tena Starr at tenas@bartonchronicle.com

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Wheatley remembers World War II

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Donald Wheatley served in the Army during World War II.  Here he poses with a picture of his outfit during the war, of which he is the last living member. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Donald Wheatley served in the Army during World War II. Here he poses with a picture of his outfit during the war, of which he is the last living member. Photo by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle May 20, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT — At 93, Donald Wheatley has witnessed most of the major events of the twentieth century, and participated in a big one, World War II.

“I’m 93 years young,” he said in an interview Friday. “I say that seriously. I’m only 93.”

His sister is 96 and still drives, and his father’s mind stayed sharp until he died at 106, Mr. Wheatley said.

None of the members of Mr. Wheatley’s Army outfit were casualties of war, but 70 years after the end of World War II, he is the last surviving member of his company.

“They say 1,000 World War II veterans die every day,” he said.…To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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In Newport: “Downton Abbey” comes to the Goodrich library

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Helene Lang of Shelburne, appearing in the persona of children’s author Beatrix Potter, was the guest speaker at the tea. Her performance, called “Beatrix Potter Revisited,” is sponsored by the Vermont Humanities Council with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.  The famous children’s author lived at the same time as the characters of “Downton Abbey.”  Photo by Elizabeth Trail

Helene Lang of Shelburne, appearing in the persona of children’s author Beatrix Potter, was the guest speaker at the tea. Her performance, called “Beatrix Potter Revisited,” is sponsored by the Vermont Humanities Council with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The famous children’s author lived at the same time as the characters of “Downton Abbey.” Photo by Elizabeth Trail

copyright the Chronicle May 13, 2015

by Elizabeth Trail

NEWPORT — It could have been a scene from England between the wars.  In the kitchen, maids in lacy white pinafores laid out trays of iced cookies, thinly sliced cake, and cucumber sandwiches on triangles of thin bread — crusts cut off, of course.  Out in the grand dining room, about 45 guests in their finest hats and gloves admired elegant table settings and chatted with friends while they waited for their tea to be served.

The event was the Goodrich Memorial Library’s “Downton Abbey” Tea, held on Saturday afternoon in the elegant upstairs rooms of Newport’s historic library.  With its grand staircase, high ceilings, and carved paneling, the 1899 library building was the perfect setting for a step back in time.  The library has held fancy teas for a number of years — first a mother’s tea, then a senior’s tea, and for the past two years, the “Downton Abbey” tea….To read the rest of this article, and all the Chronicle‘s stories, subscribe:

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Les Misérables comes to Orleans

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Katie Kelly, playing the young Cosette, sings “Castle on a Cloud” in the first act of Les Misérables.  The show was put together as part of the Vermont Family Theatre.  Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Katie Kelly, playing the young Cosette, sings “Castle on a Cloud” in the first act of Les Misérables. The show was put together as part of the Vermont Family Theatre. Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle May 6, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

ORLEANS — The cast of Vermont Family Theatre’s Les Misérables nailed the opening night of their show on Friday, remembering every line and singing every note.

Friday was the first of a three-day run of the show, put together by Artistic Director Karen Perry.

It was obvious that all the actors loved the show and gave it their all. The choruses were excellent and very effective, moving the story forward and making hearts race.

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Actors share addiction experience with high school kids

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Left to right, Shahjehan Khan, Elizabeth Addison, and Dennis Staroselsky perform the first version of the designated driving skit at North Country Union High School to raise awareness.  Mr. Staroselsky plays the drunk driver who ends up crashing his car, killing himself and his two friends. Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

Left to right, Shahjehan Khan, Elizabeth Addison, and Dennis Staroselsky perform the first version of the designated driving skit at North Country Union High School to raise awareness. Mr. Staroselsky plays the drunk driver who ends up crashing his car, killing himself and his two friends. Photos by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

copyright the Chronicle April 29, 2015

by Nathalie Gagnon-Joseph

NEWPORT — “I couldn’t possibly have a problem because I don’t like cocaine, I just like how it smells,” is one of the edgy jokes the Improbable Players, a Boston theater troupe, used to raise awareness about drug and alcohol abuse at North Country Union High School (NCUHS) on Tuesday.

The teens attending oohed and aahed and laughed often as the troupe performed on stage in the auditorium.

The initial skits were followed by a play and a question and answer period when the students could ask the actors anything that came to mind.

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