In Troy: 100 North, where the East meets Western comfort food

Featured

Amy Wan (right) and chef Mike Wheeler go over the night's dinner menu at 100 North Restaurant Saturday.

Amy Wan (right) and chef Mike Wheeler go over the night’s dinner menu at 100 North Restaurant Saturday.

copyright the Chronicle January 21, 2015

by David Dudley

TROY — Amy Wan grew up in the restaurant business. Her parents, Emily and Kenny Wan, own and run Wok and Roll in Newport. So when Ms. Wan opened her own restaurant, 100 North in Troy on January 2, it would seem like a natural progression. But, Ms. Wan said, her venture began as more of a joke.

“My Dad bought the building at 100 Route 100 at auction,” Ms. Wan said. “He had this building, but he didn’t want to open another Chinese restaurant. We were talking, and I said I’ll take it! He asked if I was serious. That’s how it became mine.”

Continue reading

Share

In West Glover: Andersonville Farm has a new champion

Featured

James Coe takes a moment to chat in his office at Andersonville Farm in West Glover.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

James Coe takes a moment to chat in his office at Andersonville Farm in West Glover. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle January 14, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

WEST GLOVER — James Coe traveled by way of Oregon to get to the office at Andersonville Farm where he sat Thursday afternoon. As one of the owners and the managing partner of the farm, Mr. Coe now works a hundred yards or so from his boyhood home.

His office, a small wood-paneled room, is obviously not his main workplace. A wall calendar portraying a champion Holstein is still turned to October. Plaques recognizing the farm for producing quality milk are stacked on a windowsill, although it is hard to know where they would go. The hallway outside the farm’s office is lined with similar awards and there seems to be little room left for more.

Continue reading

Share

Documentary celebrates orchestra’s rise

Featured

Working with what was two-thirds of his orchestra in April of 2011, Mr. Michelli leads a rehearsal at The First Universalist Parish of Derby Line.  Following his lead, from left to right, are Chris Maginniss, Lisa C. Erwin, Paul Gavin, and Susan Brassett.  Photo by Joseph Gresser

Working with what was two-thirds of his orchestra in April of 2011, Mr. Michelli leads a rehearsal at The First Universalist Parish of Derby Line. Following his lead, from left to right, are Chris Maginniss, Lisa C. Erwin, Paul Gavin, and Susan Brassett. Photo by Joseph Gresser

copyright the Chronicle January 7, 2015

by Joseph Gresser

DERBY LINE — About three and a half years ago, the Chronicle published an article about a man who had brought a few local musicians out of retirement and was working to create a local orchestra. In April of 2011, a few months after he started the Newport Area Community Orchestra, Ken Michelli, the orchestra’s founder, conductor, and engine, had found two clarinetists, two flute players, a violinist, and a cellist.

Continue reading

Share

In Westfield: Building community with recyclable materials

Featured

Collin Mahoney of Butterworks Farm brings a truckload like this each week to the Westfield Recycling Center.  Photos by David Dudley

Collin Mahoney of Butterworks Farm brings a truckload like this each week to the Westfield Recycling Center. Photos by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle December 23, 2014

by David Dudley

WESTFIELD — There’s a place in Westfield where people gather every Saturday morning to see friends and family. It’s not a sporting event, or a church, or a bar that opens early. It’s a recycling center, and many of the citizens of Westfield and neighboring towns have been making this trip for seven years now. For the town of Westfield, recycling is a community affair.

Yves Daigle established the Westfield Recycling Center in 2007, and it has been growing ever since.

Continue reading

Share

In Glover: Santa comes to town, in a fire truck

Featured

Alex Young of Glover attempts to toss a miniature wreath on one of the tines of a ten-point buck painted by Lorie Seadale.  Photos by David Dudley

Alex Young of Glover attempts to toss a miniature wreath on one of the tines of a ten-point buck painted by Lorie Seadale. Photos by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle December 17, 2014

by David Dudley

GLOVER — The fire station here was packed with children and their parents Saturday night waiting for Santa to arrive. Though Mr. Claus was late — apparently due to problems with his sled — there were still lots of things to do at the tenth annual Ride a Fire Truck with Santa, held by the Glover Volunteer Fire Department.

But nobody had to remind the children not to pout or cry. They were in the mood to make merry.

Continue reading

Share

On Craftsbury Common: Candlelight vigil held for victims of police violence

Featured

Julie Lou Lepping, a student at Sterling College, organized a candlelight vigil Sunday to protest recent police violence in Missouri and New York.  “I felt so angry and confused by the injustices being done to people of color in America,” Ms. Lepping said.  “I felt I had to do something.  How can you not?”   Photo by David Dudley

Julie Lou Lepping, a student at Sterling College, organized a candlelight vigil Sunday to protest recent police violence in Missouri and New York. “I felt so angry and confused by the injustices being done to people of color in America,” Ms. Lepping said. “I felt I had to do something. How can you not?” Photo by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle December 10, 2014

by David Dudley

CRAFTSBURY — Roughly 40 people gathered on Craftsbury Common Sunday night to hold a candlelight vigil in response to police violence against black Americans.

Julia Lou Lepping, a student at Sterling College from Louisville, Kentucky, organized the vigil. As the 40 people, who all carried candles, filled the center of the snow-covered common, they formed a circle.

Though it was dark, and two degrees below zero, a full moon bathed the group in cool light.

Continue reading

Share

In Greensboro: After 114 years, Willey’s Store remains famously eclectic

Featured

Robert Willey-Hurst, current president of Willey's Store, Inc., has worked tirelessly these past six years to see that the store remains a community center.  Photos by David Dudley

Robert Willey-Hurst, current president of Willey’s Store, Inc., has worked tirelessly these past six years to see that the store remains a community center. Photos by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle December 3, 2014

by David Dudley

GREENSBORO — While stories about Black Friday’s frenzied shopping flooded the Internet, the day after Thanksgiving began like any other at Willey’s Store, which is now in its one hundred and fourteenth year of operation.

Robert Willey-Hurst, president of the Willey’s Store, Inc., opened the store at 7 a.m. as usual. The only thing he did differently was stretch the annual winter sale, which usually runs for a single weekend, into a two-week event this year.

Continue reading

Share

In Norton: Bo, the two-legged goat

Featured

Bo, who lives in the house with the Greenleafs, was born without the use of his hind legs.

Bo, who lives in the house with the Greenleafs, was born without the use of his hind legs.  Photos by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle November 26, 2014 

by David Dudley

NORTON — One afternoon in the summer of 2012, David Greenleaf and his wife, Bunny, went out to run errands. They had been raising and breeding goats for three years at this point and knew one of their nanny goats was due any day. Though they knew it would be soon, Mr. and Mrs. Greenleaf were surprised by what awaited them when they returned home that day.

“The mother had birthed four little ones,” Ms. Greenleaf said. “Three of them were dead. And then there was Bo —short for Bow-legged — a baby French Alpine goat, laying there in the wood shavings. We knew he was special from the moment we saw him.”

Continue reading

Share

Peggy Loux is a woman with a purpose

Featured

Peggy Loux received the Agency on Aging Community Service Award on Monday.  Photo by David Dudley

Peggy Loux received the Agency on Aging Community Service Award on Monday. Photo by David Dudley

copyright the Chronicle November 19, 2014

by David Dudley

JAY — Margaret “Peggy” Loux, who is now serving her fifth year on the Jay Select Board, received the Agency on Aging Community Service Award Monday.

According to Ms. Loux, everybody has got to work, and everybody has got to have a purpose. What is Peggy Loux’s purpose?

Though her various activities would suggest otherwise, she claims to be a shy person.

Continue reading

Share

Rifle season: Mild winters may lead to higher success rate

Featured

Makenzie Smith, 10, of Irasburg shot her first buck, an eight-pointer weighing 164 pounds, during Youth Weekend — in her secret spot!  Photo courtesy of her very proud Grampa Brent Shafer

Makenzie Smith, 10, of Irasburg shot her first buck, an eight-pointer weighing 164 pounds, during Youth Weekend — in her secret spot! Photo courtesy of her very proud Grampa Brent Shafer

copyright the Chronicle November 12, 2014

by Paul Lefebvre

Between sunrise on Saturday, opening day of rifle season on deer, and closing day at sunset on November 30, hunters will lose roughly 30 minutes of hunting time.

That’s because they can hunt deer from 30 minutes before sunrise and 30 minutes after sunset during the 16-day season.

But sunrise on November 15 comes at 6:45, or 19 minutes earlier than it does on Sunday, November 30 — the last day in the season.

A comparable loss in time occurs at sunset. On Saturday the sun will set at 4:21 compared to 4:10 on the last day of month. Added together and that’s a loss of 30 minutes in real time.

Will it make any difference in hunters’ success rate? Probably not.

Continue reading

Share